RangeRovers.net Forum banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
Joined
·
174 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Greetings from Melbourne, Australia

I had posted an earlier thread on December 17 under 'EAS hard fault, random height rise and a leak somewhere'

Thanks to all those who offered help; I reset the hard fault with the EAS kicker, fixed the random height rise by servicing the connector block to the EAS driver module and fixed the leak by replacing the diaphragm in the valve block.

While I was in there I added extra air lines and car-tyre valves to a bracket in the front so I can pump up the system manually with a bike pump. Brilliant! now that it's failed again, I just pump it up each day (one of the front springs has quite a leak; new springs are on their way).

The issue is that the diaphragm has failed again after two months; I'm getting air leaks around the exhaust port on the EAS block.

In December, the old diaphragm had deteriorated due to water in there somewhere. The metal disc had separated from the rubber ring and there was evidence of rust coloured water there.

Strange; isn't the dryer supposed to remove all water from the system?

I haven't pulled the diaphram out yet but I'm expecting to find the same problem.

Does anyone have any insight into this?

Thanks in advance

Tom
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
549 Posts
Did you replace or refill the dryer ? If not unscrew the top and check the desiccant. Should be balls not powder.

Also some of the EAS Seal kits are simply low quality . .. you might have got a diaphragm with limited life !!
 

·
Registered
1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
Joined
·
1,410 Posts
Also drain down the air reservoir tank to see if there is any water in it. Do it carefully as the air will be at 150psi and use a full face mask.
 

·
Registered
1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
Joined
·
174 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Ah. The tank.

I replaced my dessicant a year or so ago; I checked it again; it's nice hard white balls.

Can't I depressurise the tank by simply removing the air line from the valve block, or is the idea that with the drain plug loosened but not completely removed, any water will be expelled by the force of the exiting air?

Thanks
 

·
Registered
1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
Joined
·
1,410 Posts
The safest method is to drop the pressure by raising and lowering the car a few times, and then remove the air line at the valve block. When the system is depressurised, take out the drain plug to check.
There shouldn't be any way to get water in the system. All air is drawn in from the outside via the air compressor and dried by the dessicant. Maybe with your air leaks your compressor has been running all the time and it has overwhelmed the system. Didn't you have severe flooding in Melbourne a while back?
You can microwave the dessicant to revive it and get it bone dry. You can see steam coming off when I have done it.
 

·
Registered
1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
Joined
·
28 Posts
I dissagree that the safest method to depressurise is disconnecting at the valve block.

By all means try and lower pressure by operating and quickly kill ignition to stop the compressor. However the plug on the tank has a groove down it’s side and a long thread, so once it is cracked the air will safely bleed out. Eye protection is wise. Once the air stops you can safely undo the plug.

Cheers
 

·
Registered
1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
Joined
·
1,410 Posts
stevesal wrote:

dissagree that the safest method to depressurise is disconnecting at the valve block.

By all means try and lower pressure by operating and quickly kill ignition to stop the compressor. However the plug on the tank has a groove down it’s side and a long thread, so once it is cracked the air will safely bleed out. Eye protection is wise. Once the air stops you can safely undo the plug.
I did think carefully about what method I was recommending to Atticus. I have done it previously the way you suggested by partially unscrewing the drain plug, but for someone who has never done it before and not used to working with compressed air, remember it is 150 psi and the drain plug would fly off like a bullet. Rave says to use Testbook to let the pressure go via the exhaust valve.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
27,793 Posts
Also drain down the air reservoir tank to see if there is any water in it. Do it carefully as the air will be at 150psi and use a full face mask.
depressurize the EAS system before doing ANY work on the tank... standard safety procedure.
 

·
Registered
1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
Joined
·
174 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Thanks to all who helped; I just read the posts.

I removed the valve block (again) and inspected the exhaust diaphragm; this time, no evidence of water. Instead there were what looked like some tiny chunks of dessicant - not powder but tiny chips. I cleaned it all out and replaced the diaphragm; it's all tip-top now.

1) So it's into the kitchen with the dessicant; why not; the P38 seems to take over every other corner of the house one way or the other; find the the colander and shake the dessicant around in it around to remove any small chips. Microwave the dessicant but it was pretty new anyway and I couldn't see any steam come off it. The issue might have been that I think the steel grate and filter inside the dryer were reversed but even so, that filter should have prevented ingress of particles to the EAS valve block.

2) Those air line collets and pipes into the valve block seem to be wearing a bit. I'm not too worried about it, the collets just keep the pipes in place but has anyone done a threaded conversion? The L322 has a newer, threaded system. That collet and pipe system seems a little dodgy. Still, mine is leak free now. All the collets have to do is locate the pipes. Of course the original engineers never knew how much maintenance the system would need over the years. It's still a great system and very easy to work on.

3) I haven't got to the tank yet but I will depresssurise it carefully. Wouldn't any water collect down the bottom of the tank and sit there? How do I remove any water without removing the tank?

Yes, we had monster floods here recently; now it's bushfire season. You know that old song, "come to Australia, you might accidentally get killed; red back, funnel web, blue ringed octopus" etc. Driving on the wet sand down at one of my coastal haunts recently, it was hilarious to sit there and raise the car up to maximum height and just drive, imperiously, through anything while the Toyota owners look envious.
 

·
Registered
1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
Joined
·
1,410 Posts
Sounds as though your desicant is OK. You need to have a few spare collets to hand as they do get worn and break. Also remember there are two o-rings in each air line connection to the valve block. They can easily get displaced. Fish them out with a crocket hook and fit new ones all round. Make sure they are properly seated. Cut a chamfer on the ends of the pipes with a pencil sharpener and put a bit of dishwashing liquid on them to help pushing them in. No need to tap threads into the block, the system is OK.
Once you depressurise the tank and remove the drain plug, if there is any water present it should be self evident. I used to check mine every 2 years but never seen any.
I wondered whether your car had been submerged.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
549 Posts
Surely if the valve block is out of the car, the tank is now depressurised ? Drain it while servicing the valve block !!
 

·
Registered
1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
Joined
·
174 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
Thanks to Dave and Pwood.

Yes, I should have inspected the tank first. I can see by the width of that inspection plug on the tank that it should be quite easy to see inside, with the plug out, what's in there.

My car's never had water over the top of the wheels so I don't think that's the source of the ingress. I'll get back to it soon enough and post the results. I fitted four tyre valves to pump up the system manually; it was an excellent, easy mod. Surely the most logical and practical way to depressurise the tank is to fit another inline t-piece and another tyre valve in the compressor line and just depress that valve to purge the air; this would have the added benefit of allowing easy fitting of an air line on top of that valve to pump up the tyres after sand driving, or when air is needed. I've gone this far; I may as well do the job properly; those air fittings are low cost and reliable.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top