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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all, just a very big cautionary word to those who are about or who have converted to coil, in the last week here I have heard of 2 Rangies rolling.

Both rolled while travelling on dirt roads, the one owner said vehicle started to osculate and it was over in seconds before he knew what had happened, vehicle write off, said his speed was around 70kmph

2nd also on sand road going around a light bend, no slide just gone in moments he said he was doing around 50kmph cos the road has rolly sand

All goes well pics will follow on 1st incident in a week or two when it comes in for stripping if purchase goes ahead, its a bitch sorting out these write off junks.....

Going by the design of these Rangies Air bags are the only safe bet, on the rangie the srings sit to far in to give any decent stability, if they were closer to the wheel I'd say coil springs would work well with good shocks

Dare I say to those thinking about going the coil springs " You been warned" bet the insurance companies wont cover if you dont inform them, even if you do they may still decline a claim against the mod.....

Drive safely
 

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I call Bu!!$!^^

5 rovers, air and coils on all except the first and I have done some pretty death defying feats in all of them when it comes to turning. :clap: :pray: :clap:


I dont care if someone chooses to keep the suspensions or convert, you rover, your choice. But i dare not try to convince someone by lying to them. This isnt church or politics.

Unless you have on some ridicolous high and I mean high springs and tried to turn at like 70 mph on almost a 90 degree turn,(done it at 60 mph) your going to be fine. Anyone saw the range rover on Nuremberg Rac Track, that was awesome
 

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viperover said:
Going by the design of these Rangies Air bags are the only safe bet, on the rangie the srings sit to far in to give any decent stability, if they were closer to the wheel I'd say coil springs would work well with good shocks
I can't see how there is any logic to this. What is it about an air spring that would increase stability? I'm a fan of EAS, but this seems really silly.
 

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Sounds like the drivers need to take responsibility of the vehicles they are controlling regardless of the suspension. Driving unsafely is driving unsafely.
 

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vmystikilv said:
I call Bu!!$!^^

I have done some pretty death defying feats in all of them when it comes to turning. :clap: :pray: :clap:
No offence but a quote like that I don't class as a good advert for any body's opinion.

One thing I do know is if things go horribly wrong and I ended up in court I would much rather be arguing knowing that I was driving a vehicle as it was designed rather than trying to argue that my modification is "just as safe"
 

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Maybe things are different in SA but I thought the US was the world leader in lawsuits. Yet I have never heard of a court case over a modified vehicle. People put stupidly tall lift kits and at the opposite extreme, slammed low cars with aftermarket springs. Surely these cases are worse than a Rover with a spring conversion. I wouldn't do it but I don't believe its dangerous.
 

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Oh trust me, there are plenty of court cases over modified vehicles in the U.S.

I remember one in new orleans, kid caused a horrible accident and had nitro in the car. Lets say that case didnt go to well for him.

As far as my death defy turns comment, the only thing I wish to convey is that switching to coils does not promote instability. Those turns where also to get out of trouble, not in. Had I been driving a lot of other vehicles in this world I would have fliped or slid off the road and hurt someone. I remember once, at night in the 97, was doing about 50mph in a 45mph and a freaking wild pig just ran into the road, slammed brakes and was able to turn away by inches. And that was after it was coiled

I always wondered if coils to a certain extent where maybe better at times over air. In hard braking for instants, in bags wouldnt the car potentialing dip down over in the front more and cause greater braking distants. Again, which ever, i have always felt perfectly safe either coiled or air but i would be curious to see a brake test with both of them. :think:
 

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Yes, I suppose there are lawsuits over modified vehicles. But bags to springs is not like a 5" lift or even going to be noticed.
Why would the bags allow more during braking? Assuming the effective spring rate being equal to a coil I can't see why there would be any difference.
 

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NorCal RR said:
People put stupidly tall lift kits and at the opposite extreme, slammed low cars with aftermarket springs. Surely these cases are worse than a Rover with a spring conversion.
I absolutely agree with you here. Just because there were a couple of coiled P38s that rolled doesn't mean that the coil springs were the X-factor that caused the roll. If the vehicle began to oscillate then there may have been a problem with steering geometry (death wobble or similar?) due to poorly set up/maintained components or perhaps worn shock absorbers that weren't able to dampen the vehicles back and forth/side-to-side motion over uneven terrain or perhaps jerky steering input from the driver. Unless there was extreme ride height lift, even a softer 'passenger' or comfort spring rate wouldn't be an issue - most likely the vehicle was going too fast for the radius of the turn they were making (also need to factor in the type of surface they were driving on). The location of the springs just because they were originally air, is not so radically different that changing to coils would cause a roll with normal driving. All things being equal, if you had an airspring and a coil with similar rates etc, the vehicle wouldn't know the difference.

Drive safe and keep your wheels pointed in the right direction - towards the ground! :D
 

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Didn't make it a month into 2010 before someone started banging on about coils being illegal / dangerous yadda yadda yadda. Please change the record.
 

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I have to agree with rogan & vm. This topic is absolute bullplop. It's a great example of how to take simple cases of poor driving and blame it on a vehicle. That's like saying Samuris were dangerous and flipped because of their short wheel base. BS, folks drove them too fast. I've had my P38 start to undulate on a local old highway. The wheel base matches up with the pavement seems just right to get her going. If I slow down below 50 it's jsut fine. If I am going over 60 it's better than ma enjoying the spin cycle in the washer. What about running a washboard corner? Ya go too fast ya slide off the gravel and if you are lucky there isn't a cluff in your future. Sorry folks, you can roll a cowpie in powdered suger, but it still aint a jelly doughnut.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I like the replies if somewhat odd, guess we'll see what happens when it happens to someone on here, god forebid..

When braking the airbags maintain their pressure unlike springs, yes I've driven a P38 with springs and did notice a dipping while braking vs the airbags.

In a hard braking situation I'd rather have air bags. period
The shocks fitted to the vehicle I drove were Bilsteins and I felt uncomfotable with the setup, that was a month ago

Today a customer comes in with a misfire, replace burst coil and all is fine, blast car up the road......mmmm coil springs....felt like the Titanic on a balled bearing road, very floppy and unstable, not sure if the correct springs or shocks had been installed as it looked abit low vs the one I drove.

Anyhow its obvious those who have springs vs those of us who dont, either way enjoy your Rangie and try keep cool as theres no need for smuty replies, I have no time for it as I repair Range Rovers, I get no financial reward here for advice given and quite frankly Im not interested, there is one member here who uses my services and he was referred to me by a supplier so if you think I post here to get customers its not the case as we live in different parts of the world......great
 

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viperover said:
When braking the airbags maintain their pressure unlike springs,
not exactly, they both see increased pressure, so they both return increased pressure.


it all depends on the design of the spring, and airbag IS a spring. some (oem) are designed with a falling rate, coil springs can be designed as falling rate, but are typically linear or rising rate. GenIII airbags are rising rate.

With any type of spring, air, coil, leaf, magnet, feather-pillow etc.... the spring exerts a force in opposition to the force on it. add more force (braking, nose dips) and the spring pushes back harder, period. The amount of change is what determines the rate (rising, falling, or linear). If braking adds 50lbf to the spring, and it pushes back with 55, there will be little dip, and the inverse for a falling rate...
I think the design of the spring has much more effect than the type of spring. an airspring may get more or less travel than a coil, but they will both hold the frame up off of the axle using the same principles of physics.
 

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