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Discussion Starter #1
Hi All,

Long time since I last posted but have been very busy and away with work for a while.

I have an issue with my ES now though in that it takes a long time to pump up most times to normal ride height. It happened after someone borrowed my car to pick up loads of tiles and cement and grout. He said he drove for about 20 minutes with the eas lights still flashing. I was not best pleased but it had already happened and I did offer to lend him the car. (Never again)....

Anyway.... Has it done real damage to the EAS compressor or is it something different. Once up, it holds fine and no dropping corners... Just takes sometime a couple of miles to reach full height and light stops flashing.

Any clues.

Thanks All as always.

Ash
 

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JACK'S GRANDAD
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9,248 Posts
sounds like a leak to me.
with it up, turn off the motor and test for leaks.
if nothing found there, get all the air out of it and then start it up and time how long it takes to fill the tank from empty (engine running, door open).
either a leak allowing it to drop and then take forever to build back up, or a weak compressor.
thats my .02
if it did not go into a fault mode, no damage done i dont think.

martin
 

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I've had a similar experience w/ loading heavy items in a RR.....Simply put, these air suspensions were not designed to carry heavy loads. Period.

When the cargo space is loaded up w/ heavy items, rear suspension strain to keep it level, and the compressor works overtime to keep the pressure up.

What's interesting is that immediately after the heavy load is unloaded, the rear suspension goes into super-extension mode...., since the pressure is still built up inside the suspension to support the heavy load.

So, my guess is either the super-extension have damaged your rear air bags if they were frail to begin with, or the overworking of the compressor has worn itself down.
 

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FOUNDING MEMBER
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TheoR said:
I've had a similar experience w/ loading heavy items in a RR.....Simply put, these air suspensions were not designed to carry heavy loads. Period.
not true, air suspension was designed specifically FOR heavy/varying loads.

When the cargo space is loaded up w/ heavy items, rear suspension strain to keep it level, and the compressor works overtime to keep the pressure up.
only if there's leaks. The springs typically run about 50psi, loaded down they need 60 (ish). The compressor/reservoir run at 140psi, that's not what I call straining.


What's interesting is that immediately after the heavy load is unloaded, the rear suspension goes into super-extension mode...., since the pressure is still built up inside the suspension to support the heavy load.
true, to prevent this, lower to access before unloading or close the tailgate and allow it to re-level periodically while unloading.

So, my guess is either the super-extension have damaged your rear air bags if they were frail to begin with, or the overworking of the compressor has worn itself down.
exactly right (but for the wrong initial reasons).

The big issue is
if they were frail to begin with
the EAS requires maintenance, just like brakes. The major parts are consumables. keep it in good shape and it will treat you well.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
OK - Thanks all.

Nothing like this was wrong before hand so the system was in good order before.

So do I need to do anything to sort it and what would I have to do. Is this something that I can tackle. where should I start...?

Thanks
 

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LEGACY VENDOR
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TheoR said:
I've had a similar experience w/ loading heavy items in a RR.....Simply put, these air suspensions were not designed to carry heavy loads. Period.
FYI, air suspension has been invented to keep up with heavy loads.
At the beginning it was a truck or pickup truck add on to level those during trailing sessions.
Then engineers used them on differents things from High Speed Train (French TGV) or SUV mainly.
I always remember the face of the SKF guy when he loaded 1200 lbs of bearings in my trunk and then when the rangie went up. :doh:
 

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i think you've either put the compressor past it's useful life, a rebuild is in order. or your springs/tank are leaking, time for new springs and/or orings.

slow pumping is usually a weak compressor, sometimes compounded by a leak.

The easiest route is a full overhaul, kind of like doing a brake job, you don't do rotors and keep the old pads.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
OUCH...! - Thanks Shupak, that sounds expensive. I don't believe there are leaks as it does not drop at all if left for a couple of days. Is there an overhaul kit I can get for the compressor and is it something I should attempt myself..?
 

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2010-2012 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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Provided the systems holds its air, the compressor will not wear out. Even with a tonne on the back, the system should not leak. The only way the pressure would reduce in the system is via the valve block exhaust - i.e. in a controlled way.

I bet there is a rear leak, either in the airspring rubber, collet, airline or valve block. You just havn't seen it yet. You need to get hold of leak detection spray and get someone to help by rocking the car when you've applied the spray. Very often hard to find leaks only occur when the car is moving.

You can either buy the rebuild kits from Dennis' UK sources or buy complete new units via an aftermarket source. You are looking a between £800 and £900 for the aftermarket route which is 4xairsprings, 1xvalve block, 1xCompressor and 1xEAS Driver module.
 
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