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2006-2009 Range Rover Sport
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Discussion Starter #1
My serpentine belt broke this winter. Struggling to remove the fan clutch and about to take my saw all to it and install an electric fan.

Anyway, the dynamic stability pump appears to be frozen. I knew that there was a leak in the rear sway bar, added fluid for a while and at some point it ran dry enough to lock up so that is my bad. So, I am looking at several parts (that do not seem to be available used) that will total what? 5K?

A little about the truck, it is a 2006 SC Sport with 90,000 miles. I bought it knowing of the leaking sway bar among other issues. But, I paid $9400 a year ago so figured I could spend quite a bit to get it running – a new battery and air tank on eBay and I drove it home. Had I fixed the leak it would have been worth it, but now that I have damaged the pump the entire system likely needs to be replaced. Considering that I couldn’t tell the difference when it was working and empty, I likely do my tearing around in my BMW (as it should be) and not in the truck so thinking it is a luxury I can do without.

I am wondering if there is a means of deleting this pump in order to get it running again?
 

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2006-2009 Range Rover Sport
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12 Posts
Discussion Starter #2
well, would it be the same belt as used on a 4.2L XK8? 27781d1355398032-alternator-replacement-how-remove-drive-belt-v8-serpentine-belt.jpg

did Land Rover make 4.2L SC Sports in 2006 that did not have stability control?
 

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2006-2009 Range Rover Sport
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12 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
OK, I cant be the only one with a 2006 SC Sport that is questioning investing a third of a vehicles value on replacing all the necessary components of the dynamic response system? it doesn't appear that this is a DIY job either as parts aren't really available, You could take the chance on used parts but there is no guarantee that they will work or for how long.

These trucks depreciate like a rock, and maybe rightfully so... but with a GAP tool and the ability to diagnose the never ending faults along with the ability turn a wrench it is still too nice of a truck to be rendered a brick by the failure of essentially an optional bit of equipment.

Further, it is just wrong that the average "Joe" shouldn't be able to work on his own vehicle. Ever since I took my first car to the shop and watched the moron try to pry open the bonnet looking for the engine I drove away and bought a shop manual. I would assume that most of those with more money than brains who bought these trucks in the first place are not looking for solutions here, but if these trucks are going to survive the next decade or retain any value there needs to be options for this issue.

First of all, the easier issue should be the anti-sway bar, anyone know if the suspension for the HSE or the non-supercharged sport is similar enough to the Sport that a swaybar from one of these models will fit? or would the only option be welding the swaybar in place so it is effectively retained in the locked "fault" position when it senses an error?

The second issue would be the belt routing. easiest fix would be someone with a CNC machine taking a weekend and designing a bracket and pulley that would be a direct replacement for the existing pump.... someone owning what they thought was a $17000 truck and facing a $5000 bill to get it rolling again might pay a ridiculous amount of money (for $3 of aluminum). Then maybe there are issues with the computers, but maybe IIDTool could find a way to deactivate the dynamic response options.

Absent someone who makes a living selling aftermarket parts taking the above ideas and putting together a $1999 dynamic response delete package complete with swaybars and pulleys, what else could be done to get my truck driving again? Could the pump be taken apart and gutted so that it would behave as an idler pulley? I guess I have to re-look at the belt routing because I wonder if I could just move the alternator some, maybe slide it forward and run it off the SC belt, I am getting rid of that fan clutch anyway and installing an electric fan.

Any ideas would be helpful thanks!
 

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You have a few options here.

Belt routing, and removing the pump is the easy part. Get a drive belt for a NA RRS/LR3(PQR500330) and remove the DR pump and additional idler pulley.

For bars, you can install the passive bars, you'll need new bushings, and brackets/hardware along with new non-DR rear links. The front bar mounts in a different location for the passive setup. If the rear bar wasn't leaking, you would be able to just leave the DR bars in place, and disconnect the valve block, which would prevent any rotation in the bars and put them in a 'locked bar' state. Since the rear is leaking, it would bleed off the fluid which would then allow the bar to rotate, effectively removing any weight transfer in the rear of the vehicle.

If you install a non-DR belt setup, and replace the bars with passive, you would then need to have the CCF reflashed to set it as DR not-fitted, which should remove your warning light at that point. You may have trouble finding someone that can/will do this, and I don't know the full capability of most aftermarket diag systems.

If you do decide to weld up the bars somehow, keep in mind that these bars are much stiffer than the passive bars, and without the system able to function, ride quality may suffer significantly.

Also, I would strongly suggest you reconsider replacing the fan, if nothing else, you will have a check engine light on. The great thing about electro-viscous setups are that it is nearly no engine load, unless higher cooling levels are needed. If you haven't damaged the nut yet, make sure that you're going the right way, NA engines are LH thread, SC is RH - so lefty loosey for you.
 

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2006-2009 Range Rover Sport
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12 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Thank you yes the belt routing was embarrassingly easy, a bit shorter belt and that was done.

I tried every trick I could to get that darn fan off, broke a dozen tools, even the chisel trick... Finally drilled enough holes to be able to break it off. That is good info though about the engine load, I had always removed these from my cars because they sucked power but maybe these are better now and I will reconsider and maybe I can find that part somewhere (not that I let any lights bother me any longer, a GAP tool should come standard with these trucks ?).
 
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