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1998 Range Rover P38A Gems 4.6 HSE
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
hello everyone. i purchased a 98' p38 with only 76k miles on it maybe a month ago in florida and was planning on having it shipped to new york where i stay for most of my time and decided what the heck why not just drive it up myself! with that being said, what should i have checked out prior to doing so to avoid any possible mishaps! one thing i'd like to add is that this p38 was converted to spring coils and although i want to have it switched back to air suspension, i've decided to wait till after transporting the car to do so.

i would like to wander off a bit to make this trip a little more enjoyable and less work so i would really like to try to get the vehicle as up to par (if it isn't already) as possible.

also, the seller mentioned head gaskets being replaced but on the car fax the only call out was "intake manifold gaskets replaced". when mentioned to seller he said "yea the head gaskets were replaced, theres no point of going as far as swapping out intake manifold gaskets and not doing the head while you're there". i'd like to think the man is a little trustworthy being that he runs a shop and collects defenders but you never know with these things.

thanks for reading this far. look forward to hearing from you guys.
 

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It all depends how well it has been looked after, but you are only looking at 1,000 miles or so, no great distance by my standards. If it's been converted to coils it hasn't be looked after that well or the EAS would have been repaired properly. Check all fluid levels, engine oil and coolant, brake fluid, power steering fluid, auto gearbox fluid, transfer case fluid and axles. Make sure you check as per RAVE. Important things that will stop it are anything weak in the cooling system, keep a close eye on the temperature gauge (or, better still, plug an OBD reader in and display the current coolant temperature, if it starts to climb, stop immediately). Same goes for the electrical system, everything relies on power so a failed alternator will let you run for maybe 10 miles before the battery doesn't have enough left in it to keep it running. Serpentine belt failure will give both problems, no water pump so overheating and no electrics. Make sure the propshaft UJs have been greased, grease nipples aren't there for decoration.

After the first 100 miles or so, check underneath for anything leaking. Take coolant (or water) lots of it, a couple of litres of engine oil, a bottle of ATF for gearbox and power steering and brake fluid so you can top up anything that it needs. Also zip ties, PVC tape, a basic toolkit and binding wire. Breakdown recovery wouldn't be a bad idea either. With such low mileage it should never have needed head gaskets but there will be things that have deteriorated with age rather than mileage so you are going to find lots of things that need attention once you get it back.
 
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1998 Range Rover P38A Gems 4.6 HSE
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
It all depends how well it has been looked after, but you are only looking at 1,000 miles or so, no great distance by my standards. If it's been converted to coils it hasn't be looked after that well or the EAS would have been repaired properly. Check all fluid levels, engine oil and coolant, brake fluid, power steering fluid, auto gearbox fluid, transfer case fluid and axles. Make sure you check as per RAVE. Important things that will stop it are anything weak in the cooling system, keep a close eye on the temperature gauge (or, better still, plug an OBD reader in and display the current coolant temperature, if it starts to climb, stop immediately). Same goes for the electrical system, everything relies on power so a failed alternator will let you run for maybe 10 miles before the battery doesn't have enough left in it to keep it running. Serpentine belt failure will give both problems, no water pump so overheating and no electrics. Make sure the propshaft UJs have been greased, grease nipples aren't there for decoration.

After the first 100 miles or so, check underneath for anything leaking. Take coolant (or water) lots of it, a couple of litres of engine oil, a bottle of ATF for gearbox and power steering and brake fluid so you can top up anything that it needs. Also zip ties, PVC tape, a basic toolkit and binding wire. Breakdown recovery wouldn't be a bad idea either. With such low mileage it should never have needed head gaskets but there will be things that have deteriorated with age rather than mileage so you are going to find lots of things that need attention once you get it back.

very well put. thanks you dearly.
 

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I’d give everything a good once over. Check the fluids, Condition of coolant hoses, etc. you should be good to go though. I’d bring some spare parts and fluids if you can. You will probably swap a lot of it when you get it home anyway.

Don’t be afraid of coil springs. Just because someone converted it, doesn’t mean they didn’t care for it.


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1998 Range Rover P38A Gems 4.6 HSE
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I’d give everything a good once over. Check the fluids, Condition of coolant hoses, etc. you should be good to go though. I’d bring some spare parts and fluids if you can. You will probably swap a lot of it when you get it home anyway.

Don’t be afraid of coil springs. Just because someone converted it, doesn’t mean they didn’t care for it.


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what kind of spare parts we talking here?
 

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You could go bonkers and carry loads but a serpentine belt (and a spanner so you can fit it) is a good idea but you can guarantee if you do need something on the way back it will be something you haven't got with you. Just treat it gently when you first set off and listen for any odd noises or strange feelings. Don't put the radio on initially so you will hear anything that doesn't sound right. Once you get used to the sound and feel, you'll soon noise anything that changes.
 

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Get the suggested OBD reader in any case. Those little tools are the best $30 you'll spend.

I monitor coolant temp - overheating an aluminum engine is a BAD idea
Volts - to make sure the alternator is supplying voltage consistently
Short term fuel trim - Lets me know the O2 sensors are ok and engine computer is adjusting on the fly (it should swing around between -5 and +5 but can easily go outside those bounds)
Vehicle speed - a bunch of stuff is directed based on the vehicle speed. I once solved a big problem (broken wire) simply by observing that the computer was not receiving a speed signal

Get an ELM wifi dongle for $20. DO NOT LEAVE THE DONGLE PLUGGED IN THE VEHICLE when you are done driving. It will drain your battery when the engine is not running.

And download "OBD Fusion" on the Apple store (or Torque for an Android) $5
 

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what kind of spare parts we talking here?
Belt, thermostat, some fluids to top off if needed. Minor stuff, maybe a fuel filter. A lot depends on if it’s been sitting recently or been driven regularly. Be aware that most part stores don’t have stuff on the shelf for it so i would have a few of the more likely culprits with me.


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Not worth it. Changing a thermostat if you've never done one before and don't have the correct tool for releasing the constant tension clips isn't something I'd recommend anyone trying. Same for the fuel filter, almost always seized solid so has to be cut off, again, not something easily done at the side of the road. If either of those need changing it's a job for AAA unless you are at home with a nice comfy garage to work in.
 
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I had zero issues with changing either one. Maybe it has to do with climate…. I’d do it roadside in a heartbeat if I had to.

What special tool for the thermostat clamps? A pair of pliers works very easily.




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Maybe climate related but usually you find the clips are in such as position you can't get to them with pliers, not the ones on the top anyway. A failed thermostat would make it's presence felt in the first couple of miles anyway and not something likely to fail on a journey.
 

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You could go bonkers and carry loads but a serpentine belt (and a spanner so you can fit it) is a good idea but you can guarantee if you do need something on the way back it will be something you haven't got with you. Just treat it gently when you first set off and listen for any odd noises or strange feelings. Don't put the radio on initially so you will hear anything that doesn't sound right. Once you get used to the sound and feel, you'll soon noise anything that changes.
Long 15mm spanner !!
 

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1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
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hello everyone. i purchased a 98' p38 with only 76k miles on it maybe a month ago in florida and was planning on having it shipped to new york where i stay for most of my time and decided what the heck why not just drive it up myself! with that being said, what should i have checked out prior to doing so to avoid any possible mishaps! one thing i'd like to add is that this p38 was converted to spring coils and although i want to have it switched back to air suspension, i've decided to wait till after transporting the car to do so.

i would like to wander off a bit to make this trip a little more enjoyable and less work so i would really like to try to get the vehicle as up to par (if it isn't already) as possible.

also, the seller mentioned head gaskets being replaced but on the car fax the only call out was "intake manifold gaskets replaced". when mentioned to seller he said "yea the head gaskets were replaced, theres no point of going as far as swapping out intake manifold gaskets and not doing the head while you're there". i'd like to think the man is a little trustworthy being that he runs a shop and collects defenders but you never know with these things.

thanks for reading this far. look forward to hearing from you guys.
I drove a Range Classic from New York to Miami, Florida with far more miles than 76 K. The key to a successful trip was:
a) cooling system. (flushed and hoses checked
b) battery and alternator checked
c) all belts replaced
d) auto train from Virginia to Central Florida.

I also 2 years ago did the same trip this time with a 1986 BMW 535is.
Again same routine .
Successful outcomes on both trip.

Roland Montas
1993 Range Rover classic
 

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Some really good advice here: some of the best I've seen on any forum. If it were my car (and I do have one the same year/model) I'd be a little extra cautious due to the fact that it's had the head gaskets replaced which may indicate an overheating event which does these aluminium engines no good whatsoever. When mine went it required replacement cylinder heads else the risk was the head gaskets would simply go again (the heads fail due to the extreme heat cycles which causes the alloy to 'give' (unlike in steel which has a much higher yield point and so can withstand it). I'd be driving with one eye on the temp gauge all the time and if that gauge wanders off the vertical pull over to check why. Due the age I'd replace all the heater hoses (the two to the LHS of the head on my 2000 model failed a month or so ago) and also the radiator top and bottom hoses.
The greasing of the props is also essential: one of these failed on my 2000 HSE last month and I changed all of them out just to be on the safe side.. The first indication one is about to let go will be an odd whistling sound like a football ref's pea whistle...
I too like the EAS suspension though which was one of the Unique Selling Points of these cars when they first came out. They give no trouble If the bags and valve block seals are changed out every 10 and 5 yrs respectively: compressor piston 'rings' (just a polyurathane dust seal really) they give little trouble.
Other than that: enjoy!
 

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1998 Range Rover P38A Gems 4.6 HSE
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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
How did your trip go?
haha i have yet to take the trip. ended up taking a trip to new zealand for 3 weeks and finally just got back. planning on flying down to florida once my EAS unlock v4 cables come in the mail because the car has the CEL all of a sudden. will keep everyone posted once i start the journey.
 

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Don't worry about the CEL, NAS spec cars are programmed to bring it on at the slightest excuse.
 

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1999 4.6 HSE
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I bought a car from the Midwest and shipped it across the front range. No issues when inspected, no codes stored. No issue day of shipment. Arrived 4000ft above it's home territory, CEL came on with a rough idle. Turns out the O2 sensor didn't like the change. Reset adaptive value and a new after-cat sensor, issue went away, smooth idle - issue was one then the other. US versions of the P38 are annoyingly more finicky than others. That being said, I've seen a traditional 2nd gen(more than 2 lights on the dash) make it from rural Washington to San Diego no issues.

Edit: If you take 95, there's a yard near Augusta that has a fleet of Land Rovers for break-down spares. PM me if you need, I'll go dig up the specific place. .
 

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95 mad max disco 2000 P38 4.0 upgraded to 4.6
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Bring a complete set of replcement fuses, inspect relays for burned out ones.
reading and clearing trouble codes is key.
make sure ground nut under front of fuse box and battery leads are tight.
great advice from previous posts
 
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