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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Picked up a low mileage (107K) 1997 Vitesse and have spent the last month getting her back in shape.

Now down to just a single HVAC issue: AC is blowing cold, but very weak. All the servo blend motors are working fine. RH blower motor working like a champ.

LH blower motor not turning - visually inspected via the pollen filter slot. Checked connectors, directly applied voltage and tried manually trying to assist the blower motor to start - no joy.

So it's time to take the motor out, but the workshop manual (procedure 80.20.15) seems to have omitted a few steps:

- I've removed the ECU bracket and SRS harness connector and can easily see the four screws needed to remove the fan unit.
- I've released the clip securing the harness trunking to the fascia frame and I've cut several plastic zip ties holding the black wiring harness raceway and various sensors in place, but it doesn't seem to move much, certainly not enough to allow the blower motor to clear it to drop out.

I really don't want to go to the step of removing the entire dash and instrument panel.

I've attached an image so that you can see how removal of the fan is being fouled by the harness trunking.

Any hints? Thanks!
p38_harness_obstructs_fan_removal.jpg
 

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Did you ever figure out how to remove the harness trunking? I have the same issue and am not sure how to get the fan out with this harness in the way? Thanks in advance.
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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Hi

This plastic tray with the wires can be lifted up and the fan can pass under it. It can on my RHD.

Regards

Jos
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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I'm currently in the middle of this procedure myself, LHD. The raceway is in there pretty well and doesn't move enough to allow removal of the blower. Any insights will be helpful.

Thanks.
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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Thank you. After I posted that's exactly what I did and was able to pull the blower out. The bottom line is that you can't be afraid to pull hard and break the raceway. It's best to free up the yellow wrapped wire and unplug all connectors in the area, then pull the raceway down from the left side (lhd car). The wiring will be fine and the raceway will go back into position afterward as if nothing happened. Perhaps a zip tie or two will be helpful to keep it steady afterwards.

It's nice to have good airflow once again.
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Actually just got back to this problem. By opening the wiring raceway (there are a number of connectors that snap), you can take all the wiring out. Then the raceway can easily be pushed over to the side without breaking. The wires easily move out of the way as well.

Now I have a new problem. The replacement motor is doing no better. So I've taken the old motor apart down to the motor, wiring connector, relay board and wiring housing. In the electronics manual there is no discussion for how to test feeds to connector C203. Does anyone know what should be the proper resistances, grounds, voltages in/out that should result. Here are some pictures of the individual components (came apart very easily)

FAN HOUSING.jpg FAN MOTOR WIRING LOOM.jpg FAN UNIT.jpg FAN CONTROL - FRONT.jpg FAN CONTROL - BACK.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Spent the last couple of hours looking for info on the controller board. This same board is used in Citroen and Peugeot vehicles from the same era.

Here's a good writeup in English for the replacement of the transistors: http://www.johnandchris.screaming.net/berlingo_blower/berlingo_blower.htm

I know that you've got to supply a ground voltage to pin 3 of connector 203 to get max voltage out to the fan. So if P2 and P3 of C203 are not grounding, then fan won't run. Also need to have max voltage to P4.

Tomorrow going to measure voltages and resistances acrosse working fan unit and non-working unit. More to follow.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Ok. Project nearing an end:

1. Replacing the power transistors made the fan work properly on the test bench when fed a ground control signal on C203/3 (C203/4 is 12v, C203/2 is ground).

2. When the fan went back in, it still didn't work. I was only getting 0.5 to 3V to C203/4. That a white/purple wire all the way back to the fuse box via a connector down at the RH footwell (lots of wire go down there and there's a major ground point there as well). End to end continuity on the white/purple wire. Fuse box connection for white/purple wire goes to Relay 7, in on pin 5 and then out pin 3 goes to battery 12V. No problems there or with the relay. So that means the white/purple wire is shorting out during its run between fuse box and fan connector C203, even though there is continuity in that wire.

3. Next to test a separate wire run and take the white/purple wire out of the equation: I used a 4-wire trailer cable wire to make a 6" extender/break out from the pins on the fan out toward C203. I hooked up pins 1-3 of the breakout wires to C203 and then ran a separate heavy gauge wire from the breakout connector for pin 4 of the fan directly to pin 3 in the fuse box where the relay fits and gets it's 12V feed from the battery. And Voila! When the car is started, the left fan starts when the right fan starts, both being turned on after a delay from the HEVAC unit.

4. I finished this up by running a heavy 12 gauge wire in a new conduit from the fuse box via the driver's side firewall access (lots of space there left in that hole, so no chafing) to the left fan area. I cut the white/purple wire about 6 inches from from the fuse box and fan connectors, and then used a solder splices and high grade heat shrink tubing for the permanent fix.

Lessons learned:

1. Shorts drive the car crazy - voltage to and from BECM become unreliable. Lot's of circuits get disrupted and damage occurs. We had already replaced fuse box. This short fried the fan as well. One issue creates many points of failure on these cars.
2. Disconnecting, degreasing, cleaning and reconnecting the ground points made a big difference in the car's reliability before this last bit of troubleshooting with the fan.
3. We also removed the BECM, opened it to inspect the boards and power components for heat damage, cleaned the boards and the housing, cleaned the area around the BECM and all connectors, then reinstalled everything and checked to make sure the connectors where pushed all the way in several times.
4. Taking the time to go through all this systematically (albeit over a year), eventually creates great peace of mind. Until you know the state of each part of the electrical system in isolation and clear it component-by-component, you can't trust anything.
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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I've replaced both the driver and passenger side blower motors on mine. Personally its a lot easier to replace with new or used blowers and just be done with it.
 
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