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Hey guys, I have a working ECU in my '95 Classic and just ordered a battery replacement (3.6V 150MAH NIMH VARTA) to do some preventative maintenance. I am looking for a good how-to starting from how best to get the ECU out, the battery out and battery back in. I found posts all over place but nothing definitive and clear. Any help is appreciated.
 

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Getting it out is easy enough. Unbolt the seat and tilt it back so you can get to the underside. The ECU is held in place by a plastic clip. Release the clip and unplug the assorted connectors. Each one is different so there's no need to mark them, they will only go back one way. The ECU case is held together with self tapping screws so nothing complicated and the top and bottom halves just pull apart to reveal the ECU. Then it gets a little less simple. The battery is soldered in and the board has plated through holes so connection is made to a track on both sides of the board. If you have the experience, a decent soldering iron and a solder sucker, it can be removed without damaging the board but you do need to be very careful. There are tracks under the battery too and it is easy to damage those if you try to lever the battery out. Best way is to cut the pins off the old battery and remove them one at a time. If the ECU is currently working and you aren't going to be repairing tracks, you could even cut the pins off the old battery and simply solder the new battery to those. Before putting it back in (although it might be worth connecting it up and confirming it still works first) give it a good thick coat of varnish.
 

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...give it a good thick coat of varnish...
I thought your wife's nail polish was your sealer of choice...;)

On the '95, it's easier than prior years, and the drawing in the RAVE is NOT representative of a '95 RRC. I've had both SWB and LWB, and they both have two large hex bolts on each side of the seat in the rear, (RAVE shows 4 bolts, not two.). Two smaller hex bolts in front just need to be unscrewed, and are harder to reach. I used a hex head socket with a flexible medium extension. Once these are out, the seat will fall backwards, exposing the ECU underneath the seat. If it's never been removed, you may have to clip the zipties holding the various wire harness to the seat frame. Then, disconnect. If the zip ties are not there, it's pretty easy to disconnect. As Gilbert pointed out, each connection is unique and so you don't have to worry about mapping them.

Also, as Gilbert said previously, if you have full functionality, you're probably ok in terms of the various electrical components, but I would still carefully examine the traces, caps, resistors & diodes for any blue/turquoise'ish crystals. Clean that chemically instead of scraping. If it's worse than you want to deal with, there's a forum member, o2batsea, that can rebuild and test the seat ECU for you for a small fee.
 

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thanks guys for the help, haven't started yet but before I do...I read that some folks were NOT removing the seat and accessing it from the back. I can see the ECU attached to the top of the seat looking from the back of the driver's seat. Any reason why to remove the seat vs accessing it from the back?
 

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limited access from the back vs full access with the seat unbolted. It boils down to how good you are at braille and how fat your fingers are.
 

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limited access from the back vs full access with the seat unbolted. It boils down to how good you are at braille and how fat your fingers are.
For SWBs, definitely unbolt the seat, if you have an LWB, and the forearms of a small child, you may want to attempt removing the seat ECU without unbolting the seat. However, as I stated before, the wiring harness may be zip tied to the seat rails, in which case, disconnecting the ECU from the harness is a real PITA.
 

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I'm currently rebuilding my seat ECU on my 95 RRC. I have a question about the ceramic capacitors next to the battery. They have a "104" on them. I bought replacement capacitors with a "104" on them, but they are a little smaller in size than the ones that are on the circuit board. Is that a problem, or are they the same capacity but different physical size? The ones I bought are 100000pF.

Thanks,
Doug
 

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...They have a "104" on them. I bought replacement capacitors with a "104" on them, but they are a little smaller in size than the ones that are on the circuit board. Is that a problem, or are they the same capacity but different physical size? The ones I bought are 100000pF.
100000pF = 104uF, so you should be good to go...
 

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Great topic!

I have3 RRC's all needing replacement battery's.
To sum up stay away from the NIMH one's? and only get the 100mAH one's not the 150?

Thanks

Guys/Gals
 

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I am not finding any NICD all seem to be NIMH
For use in the seat ECU, you should be fine with NiMH. I've sourced them from Batteries Plus as well as a few other places on the net. Most of the 3.6V 3-pin Mempacs will be 150mAh, which is fine. I don't think you'll find any in the 100mAh variety, but make sure it's 3.6V, 150mAh.
 

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NiMH charger are not the same as NiCD charger. Problem is how to turn the charger off, the ECU will not stop charging....

I found this quick

Anyway, it didn't work in my ECU with NiMH due overheating, may be it will work in yours?
ISTR you used 3-1.2v Duracells that had a capacity well beyond 100mAh. You are correct about the differences in charging, however, in the case of the seat ECU, that difference is not enough to matter. A 3.2V 150mAh NiMH VARTA Mempac will work fine in the RRC seat ECU and should last longer.
 

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Thanks guys! just ordered 3 NIC 3405 from Interstate Batteries
 
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