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Discussion Starter #1
I went through old threads and couldn't find what I was looking for, so I'd appreciate some input. I had a 2016 RRS HSE with the regular gasoline V6 that I sold about a year ago. I placed an order for a 2018 RRS HSE Td6 recently, but after a bit of research I'm wondering if it's the right decision.

For me, the draw of the diesel isn't so much the fuel economy, but the added driving range. It seems as though Land Rover stuffed a much smaller fuel tank in the Td6, so the overall range is very similar (see table below).

Fuel price per year is negligible and unimportant. Highway range is basically equivalent. City range and highway range are 35 and 49 miles better on the diesel respectively.



I do like the added range of the diesel (even though it's minor), but this would have been a no-brainer for me if the Td6 had the same size fuel tank as the gasoline variant.

Any idea why Land Rover put a smaller tank in the Td6? Any reason to go Td6 if I rarely ever tow other than helping to ensure they keep making diesels?
 

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There is so much more to a diesel than economy and range. There are lots of hills around here. The torque of diesel make hills and corners effortless and steady without all the shifting required in a petrol setup.
 

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There is so much more to a diesel than economy and range. There are lots of hills around here. The torque of diesel make hills and corners effortless and steady without all the shifting required in a petrol setup.
Agreed. I love my diesel and have zero regrets. I’d also add that the fuel economy is a nice little bonus. With fuel economy at roughly 30% better and diesel prices about the same as 93 around here, that cuts my full costs down by about $50 per 1000 miles which doesn’t hurt either.
 

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For me, the draw of the diesel isn't so much the fuel economy, but the added driving range.
In that case, you might be better off with the PHEV when it becomes available. While EPA numbers aren't available, Land Rover has published a combined MPG figure in the UK. The number converted to US mpg is ~ 84. Due to the opportunistic EU fuel economy math, there's probably a number that it needs to be divided by. Even if you use a whole 2, there's no way any other configuration can beat the hybrid when it comes to pure range, with the assumption of 40 mpg with a 23 gallon tank.
 

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love my diesel. as RRToadHall says, torque, torque and more torque. Highway passing is effortless. Taking it off road, the grunt the diesel provides is very helpful. Wouldn't drive any other motor in this vehicle, though might look at the plug in
 

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Discussion Starter #7
There is so much more to a diesel than economy and range. There are lots of hills around here. The torque of diesel make hills and corners effortless and steady without all the shifting required in a petrol setup.
Not a lot of hills around here, but I drive up to the mountains a lot so it will definitely be helpful then--thanks for pointing that out.

In that case, you might be better off with the PHEV when it becomes available. While EPA numbers aren't available, Land Rover has published a combined MPG figure in the UK. The number converted to US mpg is ~ 84. Due to the opportunistic EU fuel economy math, there's probably a number that it needs to be divided by. Even if you use a whole 2, there's no way any other configuration can beat the hybrid when it comes to pure range, with the assumption of 40 mpg with a 23 gallon tank.
The PHEV definitely caught my eye, but I can't wait that long unfortunately.

love my diesel. as RRToadHall says, torque, torque and more torque. Highway passing is effortless. Taking it off road, the grunt the diesel provides is very helpful. Wouldn't drive any other motor in this vehicle, though might look at the plug in
I'm going to drive the diesel and the gasoline back-to-back this weekend to compare highway passing power. It was a concern of mine since the horsepower number is reasonably lower, but glad to hear an owner speak positively about it!
 

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I'm happy so far with the TD6 .. we drove both gas V6 and V8 and I would say the TD6 is closer to the V8 for feel of power. If you've had diesels before then you will be happy with the way the engine responds to your demands. The torque is everything in my mind.
 

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Can anyone confirm that they are getting 600+ miles on the v6 gas engine on the highway?

I always felt that for the difference in price, The diesel was a no brainer?
Torque and range.



Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Those range numbers are assuming your tank holds that amount of fuel and you run it until it's completely empty, so I doubt anyone is getting close to that range. I used those numbers to keep the comparison straightforward.
 

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Can anyone confirm that they are getting 600+ miles on the v6 gas engine on the highway?

I always felt that for the difference in price, The diesel was a no brainer?
Torque and range.




Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Let's just say the truck can go waaaay further than me without a stop, if you get my drift
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I went and drove them back-to-back again. Thoughts and questions:

Diesel: great sound, great "out of the gate" acceleration due to the low end torque, power delivery was a bit uneven but that might be due to me not being used to it. Highway passing was either not great or too subtle.

Gasoline: muted sound, linear power delivery without any particular oomph. Seemed to have better high end passing ability on the highway.

Can any Td6 owners chime in on their daily experience with highway passing power?
 

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in my view, from 40 to 80, the diesel torque gets the job done very well. Just lots of power when ever you need it
 

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Can anyone confirm that they are getting 600+ miles on the v6 gas engine on the highway?

I always felt that for the difference in price, The diesel was a no brainer?
Torque and range.



Recently went on a long hwy trip and fuel light came on at 590 miles with the computer showing 50 miles until empty.
 

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Whether the TD6 makes sense depends on a lot of factors, including how you intend to use the vehicle and what is important to you.

I have had my 2016 TD6 for 2 years now (37,000 miles) and love it. This is my 4th RR and third RRS. My prior RRS was a 2011 HSE.

Compared to my 2011, I am getting approximately twice the range and my fuel cost has been cut in half. Perhaps fuel prices are very different on the West Coast, but on the East Coast diesel costs between $2.80 to $2.95 and is .20 cheaper than premium (93 octane) gasoline. The price difference fluctuates a lot during the year. So does mileage with the diesel. In the summer, I average about 29.5 gallons per mile. In the winter I average about 27.5 to 28. I usually refuel every 500 to 525 miles or so, with about 4 to 5 gallons of fuel left in the tank. With my 2011 RRS, I usually refueled every 300 miles. Obviously, the 2018 V6 RRS is more fuel efficient than my 2011. However, I am still experiencing much better cost savings, mileage and range compared to a gasoline RRS than you project for the TD6.

Apart from the added range and cost savings, the primary benefit of the TD6 for me is the additional torque, which is especially noticeable when you accelerate on the highway or on a step grade. A big improvement over my 2011 HSE.

There are some disadvantages with the TD6. The maintenance costs are a bit higher due primarily to the pollution control systems. You have to refill the DEF tank every 8,000 miles or so, which is a bit of a nuisance. Also, there is a bit of turbo lag, which is especially noticeable if you accelerate aggressively while stopped or traveling at low speeds.

Overall, if I was in the market for a new RRS, I would opt for the TD6 without question. I also agree that the PHEV looks interesting. I think hybrids are the future for Land Rover.
 

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The most important factor is how are you planning to use the vehicle. Td 6 is equipped with DPF filter (diesel particulate filter to capture particulate maters) and SCR (selective catalyst reduction) with urea injection to lower NOx emissions. All these emissions systems needs high engine temperature to work properly, the longer the better. If you are planning to use vehicle in the city without long highway runs than gasoline engine will be probably better. I use my RRS Td6 for longer runs and different vehicle for short 5- 8 miles drives.
2016 RRS Td6
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Thanks for all the replies--very helpful.

The most important factor is how are you planning to use the vehicle. Td 6 is equipped with DPF filter (diesel particulate filter to capture particulate maters) and SCR (selective catalyst reduction) with urea injection to lower NOx emissions. All these emissions systems needs high engine temperature to work properly, the longer the better. If you are planning to use vehicle in the city without long highway runs than gasoline engine will be probably better. I use my RRS Td6 for longer runs and different vehicle for short 5- 8 miles drives.
2016 RRS Td6
My daily commute is only about 5 miles each way, but I do longer trips (50+ miles) on the weekends and drive up to the mountains (200+ miles each way) a couple times a month.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I did another round of driving the Td6 and V6 Supercharged back-to-back and found one big concern. If current owners can chime in, I'd appreciate it.

When giving it full throttle from a complete standstill, the Td6 has a rather shocking amount of lag before it starts to actually move. Compare this to the V6 Supercharged that immediately gets going.

Current Td6 owners: is that bothersome or is it something you get used to?
 

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It is something that you get used to. For me, it is only an issue when I accelerate from a stop on a steep grade. I have found that the best way to accelerate from a stop is to gradually press down on the accelerator. If you floor it, the hesitation is much more noticeable. On level ground, it is less of an issue. It seems to be a combination of turbo lag and the first gear ratio on the 8-speed transmission. When you accelerate aggressively at speed in higher gears, the lag is barely noticeable and the strong torque of the diesel is what you feel. For this reason, I blame the gearing more than the turbo. All in all, the hesitation is something that I have learned to live with and the only real negative I can think of in comparison to the V6. For me, the advantages of the Td6 far out-weigh this one negative.

Admittedly, the RRS owners on this Board who have opted for the top of the line models like the AB and the SVR would not be happy with the Td6 RRS. However, the Td6 RRS is not intended to be a high-performance vehicle. Rather, it is intended to be a reliable, economical and all-around capable vehicle. That is why I chose it as my daily driver. I spend about 2 hours a day commuting back and forth to work in it. It is the most comfortable vehicle I have ever owned. It is also the vehicle of choice for long road trips and occasional towing duties. If I am in the mood to mash down the pedal, I leave my Td6 daily driver in the garage, take out my 6-speed manual 911S garage queen, select sport mode, and let her do her thing!
 
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