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Discussion Starter #1
Hey everyone! I don't post solely about my videos here a ton but I wanted to share this one with you cause, as most of you I am a massive fan of Land Rover and Range Rovers and can't get enough of all the tech that goes into these machines, albeit some times too much tech.

I had a chance to get myself 'stuck' ( I had an escape plan, going back down) in a little creek type of thing. Super slippery, rocks and deep wet sand, needless to say, it was a workout for the stock Pirelli's.

In the video, you can see me go through all the different modes and it wasn't until (near the end) when I engaged Low Traction Launch while in Grass Gravel Snow (GGS) that the truck was able to figure out it and climb out of the ditch.

I was blown away at how much different the Range Rover responded while LTL was engaged vs trying GGS without it previously. I love the amount of attention that Land Rover gives their 4x4 systems, it really does set them apart from the other guys.

If you watch, would love to hear your thoughts.
Yes yes yes, off road tires rule lol, I know, let's just focus on seeing what these machines can do, straight out of the showroom so to speak :)

Low Traction Launch In Action
 

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2013-2015 Range Rover Sport
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59 Posts
Nice video but based on your channel and interests, why don't you just get a pair of true A/T tires?
 

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"Suscribed"... I love your videos and appreciate what you are trying to show with an off the lot, stock, Rover Sport as well. It is a very capable vehicle as you have shown.... Good patience, you don't panic, and are methodical about the terrain your in and/or when temporarily "Stuck"...

A few things I noticed. Your interior options/outlay is more advanced than my 14.5 Rover Sport so I'll tell you what I do in these situations...

It appeared that your front end/skid plate was pretty much bottomed when you were stuck initially. Once "Off-Road Height" is already selected as your Rover was already too... If I put mine in Park or Neutral and hold the arrow-up button on the off-road height suspension height for and additional 4-5 seconds with my foot on the brake... I get about another inch of height past the already "Off-Road Height" position and the Rover's suspension message center says "Extended Off-Road Suspension Height" and starts to raise the front suspension and then the rear. I know this works for a 14.5' Rover for sure as I can get that height whenever I want/need it providing I'm already as mentioned in Off-Road Height, and in Park/Neutral, foot on the Brake Pedal, and in either "Dynamic", "Mud/Rock", or "Sand" Modes.... The center dash message/media screen will remind you to lower back down to Off-Road Height every few minutes and state that once you have cleared your obstacle to do just that... But I generally leave it in that "Extended-Offroad Height" for creeping and crawling around for max wheel well clearance for the extra wheel/axle articulation...especially since the anti-sway bar disconnect is electronic and automatic on my 14.5'.

I like the "Mud/Rock" setting for that kind of terrain as the center differential gets locked and allows for maximum wheel speed as well but the "Sand" setting that I believe you were in "Initially" before going thru the settings getting to the GGS Mode... (please correct me if I was wrong); Sand Mode does the same desired effect. Either Mud-Rut/Rock or Sand Mode settings from use/experience allow me to go into Transfer Case's "Low-Range" Mode with the press of a hard button and following the prompts in the center dash message system. The Low-Range setting button just aft of the shifter on my 14.5 RRS. I don't recall having a "Low-Traction-Launch" Feature or Setting on mine but that doesn't mean it does or doesn't have it... I hope I do have an "additional" Low Traction option. But that Low-Range mode on mine once activated makes optimal use of that powerful Engine, Transfer Case and Locking Center Differential. I can only activate Low-Range when in Neutral & either Mud/Rock and Sand Modes I believe as the message center says to do so in order to activate Low-Range. Once the Low-Range setting is properly selected the Rover Sport effectively becomes a Crawler! Much like my 15' Jeep Rubicon with its 4 to 1 Ratio Setting is shifted into when (4-Low) mode is pulled up int place on the Second shifter that controls (2WD, Neutral, 4-Hi, & 4-Low) transfer case settings. On the RUBICON & in 4-LO transfer case setting, 1st gear becomes so, so, very low that I call it "Super-Granny" and only use said 1st gear for water fording to ensure constant forward motion/anti-stalling. (You never want to stall your manual tranny/engine under water and equally important you never want to press in the clutch when the tranny/or Transfer Case is under water due to the chance of sucking river/stream water into the tranny/TC's vent hoses and then right into the clutch face/tranny). 3rd gear on the manual gear box while in 4-Low is a nice sweet spot of RPM's, Power, and Crawl Rate/Speed... Unlike the Jeep However, I let the Rover decide what gear to use when in Low-Range transfer case/tranny setting but to each his own.

Lastly, for a 2nd set of tires... Take it from my experience and a wasted $1500 on 5 All-Terrain's that sucked. They are NOT a jack of all trades and are certainly a master of none with one exception... Beach or Desert Sand. They are superior in pure beach or desert Sand, but nothing else. Go with a full-on and real deal Mud Terrain tire. Might I suggest "NITTO Mud-Grapplers" are the best I've used in the 4 full sets of 5 wheels with these Mud-Terrains over the last 10 years on 3 separate vehicles. The Nitto's are far SUPERIOR on everything from Dry-Pavement, Snow, Rocks, Mud/Slush, "Sandy/Clay-Loams", Wet Pavement, and lastly, even Icey road Conditions. They actually clear mud out of the treads as well as clear water from wet pavement giving a constant grip patch whether on or off-road. And when coupled with a Fantastic Rear-Wheel-Biased AWD/4WD system like we have in the Range Rover Sport with both it's automatic rear and center differential axle Locking capability the RRS is capable of so much more with probably half the effort. A Range Rover Sport With Mud-Terrain's is about on par performance wise with a Jeep Rubicon equipped with the same tires (sans the winch...) And double especially when you air those tires down from say 40 PSI when on-road down to about 20 PSI for Off-Roading just before the trail head. (General rule is never air down in PSI past/below what your rim diameter is). So, for a 22" wheel, about 20PSI is about the lowest I will go making said tires super grippy, allowing for great sidewall flex, and still making solid protection of the Rim's Lip all-the-while keeping the tires "bead" seated to the rim as well.

I keep a 750 Amp "Stanley" On-Board Air-Compressor in the Cargo Hold that will air up 4 tires back to On-Road PSI in about 10 minutes at the trail head before getting back on road. Having a full size matching Rim and matching Spare-Tire, a "Bottle-Jack", and 3-4 equal length pieces of 2X4 blocks, (about 6-inches in length each), and a basic 1/2" drive ratchet set & 2ft "Breaker-Bar" will make your life far easier for a tire change in mushy/sinking terrain should you tear a sidewall on a rock, tree-stump, etc... We learned those tid-bits the hard-way Off-Roading in the wet forest and terrain of Highland's North Carolina with my first Jeep TJ...

I'm sure you know most of the aforementioned above "Eossai604" but for those that don't know all these little Off-Roading-Tips... They can and will make all the difference for a truly enjoyable experience whether Off-Roading for fun or out of Necessity! Getting back to pavement mechanically undamaged is Paramount...

@eossai604 again, great video and technique! I enjoyed watching your water-fording video very much as well...

And as always, YMMV.... Hope this Helps some peeps here!
 

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2013-2015 Range Rover Sport SCV8 HSE Dynamic
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Yeah, been a fan of his YouTube channel for a while now, always learn something from his videos
 

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Discussion Starter #8
"Suscribed"... I love your videos and appreciate what you are trying to show with an off the lot, stock, Rover Sport as well. It is a very capable vehicle as you have shown.... Good patience, you don't panic, and are methodical about the terrain your in and/or when temporarily "Stuck"...

A few things I noticed. Your interior options/outlay is more advanced than my 14.5 Rover Sport so I'll tell you what I do in these situations...

It appeared that your front end/skid plate was pretty much bottomed when you were stuck initially. Once "Off-Road Height" is already selected as your Rover was already too... If I put mine in Park or Neutral and hold the arrow-up button on the off-road height suspension height for and additional 4-5 seconds with my foot on the brake... I get about another inch of height past the already "Off-Road Height" position and the Rover's suspension message center says "Extended Off-Road Suspension Height" and starts to raise the front suspension and then the rear. I know this works for a 14.5' Rover for sure as I can get that height whenever I want/need it providing I'm already as mentioned in Off-Road Height, and in Park/Neutral, foot on the Brake Pedal, and in either "Dynamic", "Mud/Rock", or "Sand" Modes.... The center dash message/media screen will remind you to lower back down to Off-Road Height every few minutes and state that once you have cleared your obstacle to do just that... But I generally leave it in that "Extended-Offroad Height" for creeping and crawling around for max wheel well clearance for the extra wheel/axle articulation...especially since the anti-sway bar disconnect is electronic and automatic on my 14.5'.

I like the "Mud/Rock" setting for that kind of terrain as the center differential gets locked and allows for maximum wheel speed as well but the "Sand" setting that I believe you were in "Initially" before going thru the settings getting to the GGS Mode... (please correct me if I was wrong); Sand Mode does the same desired effect. Either Mud-Rut/Rock or Sand Mode settings from use/experience allow me to go into Transfer Case's "Low-Range" Mode with the press of a hard button and following the prompts in the center dash message system. The Low-Range setting button just aft of the shifter on my 14.5 RRS. I don't recall having a "Low-Traction-Launch" Feature or Setting on mine but that doesn't mean it does or doesn't have it... I hope I do have an "additional" Low Traction option. But that Low-Range mode on mine once activated makes optimal use of that powerful Engine, Transfer Case and Locking Center Differential. I can only activate Low-Range when in Neutral & either Mud/Rock and Sand Modes I believe as the message center says to do so in order to activate Low-Range. Once the Low-Range setting is properly selected the Rover Sport effectively becomes a Crawler! Much like my 15' Jeep Rubicon with its 4 to 1 Ratio Setting is shifted into when (4-Low) mode is pulled up int place on the Second shifter that controls (2WD, Neutral, 4-Hi, & 4-Low) transfer case settings. On the RUBICON & in 4-LO transfer case setting, 1st gear becomes so, so, very low that I call it "Super-Granny" and only use said 1st gear for water fording to ensure constant forward motion/anti-stalling. (You never want to stall your manual tranny/engine under water and equally important you never want to press in the clutch when the tranny/or Transfer Case is under water due to the chance of sucking river/stream water into the tranny/TC's vent hoses and then right into the clutch face/tranny). 3rd gear on the manual gear box while in 4-Low is a nice sweet spot of RPM's, Power, and Crawl Rate/Speed... Unlike the Jeep However, I let the Rover decide what gear to use when in Low-Range transfer case/tranny setting but to each his own.

Lastly, for a 2nd set of tires... Take it from my experience and a wasted $1500 on 5 All-Terrain's that sucked. They are NOT a jack of all trades and are certainly a master of none with one exception... Beach or Desert Sand. They are superior in pure beach or desert Sand, but nothing else. Go with a full-on and real deal Mud Terrain tire. Might I suggest "NITTO Mud-Grapplers" are the best I've used in the 4 full sets of 5 wheels with these Mud-Terrains over the last 10 years on 3 separate vehicles. The Nitto's are far SUPERIOR on everything from Dry-Pavement, Snow, Rocks, Mud/Slush, "Sandy/Clay-Loams", Wet Pavement, and lastly, even Icey road Conditions. They actually clear mud out of the treads as well as clear water from wet pavement giving a constant grip patch whether on or off-road. And when coupled with a Fantastic Rear-Wheel-Biased AWD/4WD system like we have in the Range Rover Sport with both it's automatic rear and center differential axle Locking capability the RRS is capable of so much more with probably half the effort. A Range Rover Sport With Mud-Terrain's is about on par performance wise with a Jeep Rubicon equipped with the same tires (sans the winch...) And double especially when you air those tires down from say 40 PSI when on-road down to about 20 PSI for Off-Roading just before the trail head. (General rule is never air down in PSI past/below what your rim diameter is). So, for a 22" wheel, about 20PSI is about the lowest I will go making said tires super grippy, allowing for great sidewall flex, and still making solid protection of the Rim's Lip all-the-while keeping the tires "bead" seated to the rim as well.

I keep a 750 Amp "Stanley" On-Board Air-Compressor in the Cargo Hold that will air up 4 tires back to On-Road PSI in about 10 minutes at the trail head before getting back on road. Having a full size matching Rim and matching Spare-Tire, a "Bottle-Jack", and 3-4 equal length pieces of 2X4 blocks, (about 6-inches in length each), and a basic 1/2" drive ratchet set & 2ft "Breaker-Bar" will make your life far easier for a tire change in mushy/sinking terrain should you tear a sidewall on a rock, tree-stump, etc... We learned those tid-bits the hard-way Off-Roading in the wet forest and terrain of Highland's North Carolina with my first Jeep TJ...

I'm sure you know most of the aforementioned above "Eossai604" but for those that don't know all these little Off-Roading-Tips... They can and will make all the difference for a truly enjoyable experience whether Off-Roading for fun or out of Necessity! Getting back to pavement mechanically undamaged is Paramount...

@eossai604 again, great video and technique! I enjoyed watching your water-fording video very much as well...

And as always, YMMV.... Hope this Helps some peeps here!
Ham thanks as always for your amazing comments and feedback. It sounds like there are some big differences between our rigs even they are of the 'same generation' I'll do my best to answer some of your questions/comments.
Extended Mode
So the only times I have been able to get to that mode was when I was already in Off-Road height 2 (the default mode, you get when you press UP on the air suspension from normal height) and I was bottomed out. The RR would sense that and the message on the dash would appear, "for extended suspension mode, hold UP for 3 seconds". It would jack it up quite a bit more and it looks pretty strange when you get out and you see it so high up. I haven't been able to enter that mode manually, I think they took that option away at some point.
Low Range
I was a bit confused by your comment. Can you only enter low range in certain terrain settings? I can put the truck in Low Range at any time, by shifting into N and then hitting the low range button and then selecting a gear. Ceratin terrain modes will bring up that Low Range is required (Rock mode) or suggested but not required (mud/ruts). Either way Low Range is awesome lol

Thanks again for your comments and expertise!
 

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2019-2021 Range Rover Sport
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Hi all, if you have Terrain Response 2, I know that it “recommends” to you when to raise the height or go to the low gear box, does it also recommend to you when to turn on low traction launch? Does it do it automatically?
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Hi all, if you have Terrain Response 2, I know that it “recommends” to you when to raise the height or go to the low gear box, does it also recommend to you when to turn on low traction launch? Does it do it automatically?
it used to ask when you switch to Snow mode if you want to also engage low traction launch, but after an update, I think they have removed that (or I have somehow shut the message off) and I just mnauylly turn it on when I need it.
 

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Ham thanks as always for your amazing comments and feedback. It sounds like there are some big differences between our rigs even they are of the 'same generation' I'll do my best to answer some of your questions/comments.
Extended Mode
So the only times I have been able to get to that mode was when I was already in Off-Road height 2 (the default mode, you get when you press UP on the air suspension from normal height) and I was bottomed out. The RR would sense that and the message on the dash would appear, "for extended suspension mode, hold UP for 3 seconds". It would jack it up quite a bit more and it looks pretty strange when you get out and you see it so high up. I haven't been able to enter that mode manually, I think they took that option away at some point.
Low Range
I was a bit confused by your comment. Can you only enter low range in certain terrain settings? I can put the truck in Low Range at any time, by shifting into N and then hitting the low range button and then selecting a gear. Ceratin terrain modes will bring up that Low Range is required (Rock mode) or suggested but not required (mud/ruts). Either way Low Range is awesome lol

Thanks again for your comments and expertise!
Sounds like JLR did take away the "Extended Off-Road" setting from you guys with the newer but same Generation Rigs for sure... It sure is nice to be able to get that extra inch plus over the "Off-Road" suspension height that is 1+" over the Normal Ride Height setting when I need to go over curbs; due to traffic or turn around from road work.

Low Range, you are absolutely correct in how you understood me. I can only go into Low-Range-Mode "if and when" I select Neutral... Then I get a "How-To" prompt from the message center saying" (paraphrasing here) In order to switch into Low-Speed Setting you must switch into"
1: Off-Road Terrain Setting (with the Evergreen-Tree and Mud Ruts icon's)
2: Sand Mode (with the cactus icon)
And Possible a 3rd Terrain setting with the (Snow-Flake Icon) I "Think" that is an option too...
But for/when in either the Normal Drive Setting, Dynamic Setting, or in the center button "recessed" in "Auto" mode it won't let me switch over to the Low-Range Transfer Case Setting. I'm fine with that though because the only time I would use it would be in conjunction with the Speed Limiter Button, and for "Off-Road" crawling rocky terrain and/or going down a steep Off-Road decline for Maximum Traction and to let the engine, tranny, and transfer case set the crawl speed.

I would be cool to have the option though say for: towing a loaded down trailer up a steep mountain pass... When in Low/Range... that Transfer Case multiplies the power of the Torque and Pull of the engine. I don't know what our Rover's crawl ratio is but in our Rubicon it is a 4 to 1 gear setting ratio... I've never had to use 4-Low in the Rubicon because that setting in both first and second gear is so torquey that with the slightest press of the throttle and you feel like you are going to Launch the drivetrain off of both the Body/Tub and from the frame and suspension... I used the 2.73 Transfer Case 4-Lo setting in our 2003' Jeep Wrangler TJ and 3rd gear for crawling around in ice, snow, and mud. The 4 to 1 is almost too low for anything but crawling the "Rubicon" trail in Utah... hence the sub-models name.

What I really love about the Rover's Off-Road capabilities is the "Automatic" Rear and Center Differentials that you don't have to think about engaging because they are heavily monitored by the Traction Control System and are thus Automatic. In the Rubicon we have both Front Axle, and Rear Axle "Lockers" or Locking Differentials that are engaged easily with just a push of a button... But the Rover is superior because All-4-Wheels can be locked and made turn at the same speed... The Rubicon you only have the option of Locking the Rear Differential or the Front Differential due to the manually activated and fully dedicated "Part-Time" 4x4 System. The Rover's "Full-Time" AWD system is Always active and the center locking differential will lock all 4 wheels thus increasing traction immensely. It's also how our Rover's can sport Street Tire Treads and go thru about 90% of what a Rubicon can do on 35" Nitto "Mud-Terrains" as well... which are drastically different SUV's in both form and function all the way around!

Wife's 2015' Rubicon on 35"x12.50x17" Nitto Mud Terrains" (best Offroad tires I've ever used)
Ginny's 2015' Black Rubi Jeep.jpg
My 2014.5 RRS Supercharged w/Pirreli Zero's (great street tire)
14.5 Range Rover Sport Supercharged Dynamic.jpg
Gone but not forgotten:
2003 Jeep Wrangler TJ w/33x12.50x15R BFG's before swapping to 35x12.50x15R Dunlop Mud Terrains (2nd best Off-Road tires ever used)
2003 Jeep Wrangler TJ with 33x12x15 BFG ATs.jpg
 
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