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2013-2015 Range Rover Sport
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47 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Some of you may have seen my post asking for suggestions regarding aftermarket black hood vents due to the OEM version being $600 for two pieces of black plastic. For reference, I have the Dyanmic pack so the hood vents are black with inner Atlas silver mesh. Forum member SCar mentioned he had painted his himself so I decided to give it a shot and document my experiences. Pretty happy how it turned out so I decided to post a quick DIY. Full disclaimer: I have never painted anything before so this might not be the best way to do it. However I am very happy with the results. If I could do it, so can you!

Also to note: SCar completely disassembled the mesh from the rest of the vent, but he was painting it red. Most of us will be painting this black so I would not worry about painting the below plastic black. As you will see later in my pics, the plastic beneath the mesh was completely painted as well. I actually first tried his method of grinding off the melted plastic holding the two parts together to disassemble, but it was a huge pain in the a** so I decided not to bother.


Materials used:

  • 3M Sandblaster Sanding Sponges (150 and 320 grid)
  • Rust-Oleum Speciality Plastic Primer
  • Rust_Oleum 2x Ultracover Paint+Primer (Gloss Black)
  • Rust-Oleum Painters Touch 2X Ultracover Clear Gloss
  • 3M Multi-Purpose Painters Tape (1.88 inch)


Total Cost: ~$34 and about 5.5 hours of time (including waiting between coats). Actual work time of around 1 hour

54724618273__98DB9036-5B86-46E7-9AC6-76140A502314.jpg


Step 1. Removing Hood Vents

I would reccomend using a trim remover kit, I purchased one from Amazon and this whole process took about 5 minutes. Simply move tool around the vent, popping the tabs out and the vent should easily pop out. They actually come out easier than the side vents in my experience.

IMG_0638.jpg

IMG_0639.jpg

Step 2. Prepping the surface.

I first masked off the rest of the vent using the 3M masking tape, making sure to get as close to the edges of the silver mesh as possible. On the straight edges, you can feel the tape go down into the slight depression before the silver mesh starts - this is what you want so that the side of the silver mesh edge is still exposed. I used a straight edge to push down on the tape to get as close as possible while leaving all the silver portions exposed. The rounded edges take more tape - I recommend going slowly and redoing if you're not satisfied with the results. You do not want tape covering the silver portion or a gap between the substrate and the already-black portion. Here is a pic of what it looked like masked.

IMG_0640.jpg

Then, I sanded down the top surface of the mesh, first starting with the 150 grit and then moving to the 320 grit. Note that I hadn't washed the pieces in the pics so dust is still visible. I did not completely remove the silver finish, you can see it started to completely come off in sections but I did not find it necessary to go all the way. I attempted to sand the inner pieces of the mesh but that proved very difficult and time consuming so I did not bother. In the end, it did not make a difference.


IMG_0641.jpg

IMG_0642.jpg


After sanding, wash with soap and water and then clean with isopropyl alcohol to clear any oils on the surface of the plastic. I have some isoproply swabs which worked very well because I could fit them in between the mesh and get those parts cleaned as well.


Step 3. Priming

I used the primer mentioned above, one coat, moving steadily and getting about 50% overlap between strokes. I would practice this on cardboard beforehand to get a feel for how it sprays. I held about 10 inches away from the surface. Although one coat wasn't enough to completely coat the inside of the mesh, the paint also includes primer so I wasn't concerned.

54733350318__6447BE8D-0973-4552-A6FD-C9D3BE75A2C0.jpg


Step 4. First coat

After waiting for one hour, I proceeded to apply the first coat (technically two coats). My first pass was orientating the vent short sides on the top and bottom. I applied a very light coat and then waited 5 minutes, flipped the piece, and made another light coat (this time starting from the opposite short side). I recommend applying the paint at a slight angle (10 inches away) so that it is able to reach the inner mesh as well. Pic shown after the first coat. You can see that the inner mesh on the longer sides of the hexagonal pattern is not completely covered in paint due to how the piece was orientated. This is okay, we will take care of that in the second round. Wait about an hour before coming back. Keep the pieces in a relatively warm location, with adequate airflow. I chose to let the pieces dry under the cover of my basement deck (weather was 72 degrees).

IMG_0644.jpg

Step 5. Second coat

After an hour, I came back and orientated the vents the opposite way (long sides top and bottom). I proceeded to do the same thing, making two light coats, starting on opposite ends, at a light angle. These passes should ensure that all the inner mesh is painted.

54734086859__8BF039F6-44BE-43A2-9D6C-03F5F0AB077D.jpg


Step 6. Clear coat

After waiting another hour, I came back and applied two coats of the clear, orientating the pieces in the same way as step 5 and using the same technique.

54734468365__03C0713E-E769-4178-949B-E9C575DB9AAA.jpg


Results

I waited another 45 minutes before removing the masking tape (at a steep angle, making sure not to bring up any paint or disturb the painted section), although the clear should be fairly dry by then.

I was very happy with the results, the paint looked identical to the color of the rest of the vent, as well as the mesh of my Supertweaks black side grills. The piece should be completely dry within 24 hours.


IMG_0645.jpg

IMG_0646.jpg

IMG_0647.jpg

IMG_0649.jpg

IMG_0652.jpg



Closing thoughts:

This was a very easy job and the results were phenomenal. There is a small amount of orange peel due to using spray paint but I can deal with that for saving $575 bucks versus buying OEM part or having a body shop do it. As I mentioned earlier, I have no painting experience but still found this procedure pretty easy.

For those of you with non-dynamic pack cars, I'm guessing you could probably use the same method for the rest of the vent, using more primer to make sure that the paint sticks to the non-mesh parts. Also, you could do this for the side vents as well but the masking might be much harder.


Let me know if you have any questions!
 

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Registered
2016-2018 Range Rover Sport
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104 Posts
Good job, great DIY,now you only need the black center caps for your wheels lol


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Registered
2013-2015 Range Rover Sport
Joined
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47 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Good job, great DIY,now you only need the black center caps for your wheels lol


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Lol, you're right. I just got the wheels painted last week and the center caps are currently on order from Amazon :thumb:
 

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Registered
2016-2018 Range Rover Sport
Joined
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104 Posts
looks perfect, have the same wheels and color, but mine is Corris grey, I'm thinking of doing the roof in a gloss black wrap
 

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Registered
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340 Posts
Nice work. Looks great.
 

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Registered
2013-2015 Range Rover Sport
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14 Posts
Some of you may have seen my post asking for suggestions regarding aftermarket black hood vents due to the OEM version being $600 for two pieces of black plastic. For reference, I have the Dyanmic pack so the hood vents are black with inner Atlas silver mesh. Forum member SCar mentioned he had painted his himself so I decided to give it a shot and document my experiences. Pretty happy how it turned out so I decided to post a quick DIY. Full disclaimer: I have never painted anything before so this might not be the best way to do it. However I am very happy with the results. If I could do it, so can you!

Also to note: SCar completely disassembled the mesh from the rest of the vent, but he was painting it red. Most of us will be painting this black so I would not worry about painting the below plastic black. As you will see later in my pics, the plastic beneath the mesh was completely painted as well. I actually first tried his method of grinding off the melted plastic holding the two parts together to disassemble, but it was a huge pain in the a** so I decided not to bother.


Materials used:

  • 3M Sandblaster Sanding Sponges (150 and 320 grid)
  • Rust-Oleum Speciality Plastic Primer
  • Rust_Oleum 2x Ultracover Paint+Primer (Gloss Black)
  • Rust-Oleum Painters Touch 2X Ultracover Clear Gloss
  • 3M Multi-Purpose Painters Tape (1.88 inch)

Total Cost: ~$34 and about 5.5 hours of time (including waiting between coats). Actual work time of around 1 hour

View attachment 261209


Step 1. Removing Hood Vents

I would reccomend using a trim remover kit, I purchased one from Amazon and this whole process took about 5 minutes. Simply move tool around the vent, popping the tabs out and the vent should easily pop out. They actually come out easier than the side vents in my experience.

View attachment 261217

View attachment 261225

Step 2. Prepping the surface.

I first masked off the rest of the vent using the 3M masking tape, making sure to get as close to the edges of the silver mesh as possible. On the straight edges, you can feel the tape go down into the slight depression before the silver mesh starts - this is what you want so that the side of the silver mesh edge is still exposed. I used a straight edge to push down on the tape to get as close as possible while leaving all the silver portions exposed. The rounded edges take more tape - I recommend going slowly and redoing if you're not satisfied with the results. You do not want tape covering the silver portion or a gap between the substrate and the already-black portion. Here is a pic of what it looked like masked.

View attachment 261233

Then, I sanded down the top surface of the mesh, first starting with the 150 grit and then moving to the 320 grit. Note that I hadn't washed the pieces in the pics so dust is still visible. I did not completely remove the silver finish, you can see it started to completely come off in sections but I did not find it necessary to go all the way. I attempted to sand the inner pieces of the mesh but that proved very difficult and time consuming so I did not bother. In the end, it did not make a difference.


View attachment 261234

View attachment 261241


After sanding, wash with soap and water and then clean with isopropyl alcohol to clear any oils on the surface of the plastic. I have some isoproply swabs which worked very well because I could fit them in between the mesh and get those parts cleaned as well.


Step 3. Priming

I used the primer mentioned above, one coat, moving steadily and getting about 50% overlap between strokes. I would practice this on cardboard beforehand to get a feel for how it sprays. I held about 10 inches away from the surface. Although one coat wasn't enough to completely coat the inside of the mesh, the paint also includes primer so I wasn't concerned.

View attachment 261249


Step 4. First coat

After waiting for one hour, I proceeded to apply the first coat (technically two coats). My first pass was orientating the vent short sides on the top and bottom. I applied a very light coat and then waited 5 minutes, flipped the piece, and made another light coat (this time starting from the opposite short side). I recommend applying the paint at a slight angle (10 inches away) so that it is able to reach the inner mesh as well. Pic shown after the first coat. You can see that the inner mesh on the longer sides of the hexagonal pattern is not completely covered in paint due to how the piece was orientated. This is okay, we will take care of that in the second round. Wait about an hour before coming back. Keep the pieces in a relatively warm location, with adequate airflow. I chose to let the pieces dry under the cover of my basement deck (weather was 72 degrees).

View attachment 261257

Step 5. Second coat

After an hour, I came back and orientated the vents the opposite way (long sides top and bottom). I proceeded to do the same thing, making two light coats, starting on opposite ends, at a light angle. These passes should ensure that all the inner mesh is painted.

View attachment 261265


Step 6. Clear coat

After waiting another hour, I came back and applied two coats of the clear, orientating the pieces in the same way as step 5 and using the same technique.

View attachment 261273


Results

I waited another 45 minutes before removing the masking tape (at a steep angle, making sure not to bring up any paint or disturb the painted section), although the clear should be fairly dry by then.

I was very happy with the results, the paint looked identical to the color of the rest of the vent, as well as the mesh of my Supertweaks black side grills. The piece should be completely dry within 24 hours.


View attachment 261274

View attachment 261282

View attachment 261290

View attachment 261297

View attachment 261298



Closing thoughts:

This was a very easy job and the results were phenomenal. There is a small amount of orange peel due to using spray paint but I can deal with that for saving $575 bucks versus buying OEM part or having a body shop do it. As I mentioned earlier, I have no painting experience but still found this procedure pretty easy.

For those of you with non-dynamic pack cars, I'm guessing you could probably use the same method for the rest of the vent, using more primer to make sure that the paint sticks to the non-mesh parts. Also, you could do this for the side vents as well but the masking might be much harder.


Let me know if you have any questions!
Awesome, thanks for the wrtieup.. I was thinking to do the same and you just confirmed it for me. Thanks a bunch!
 
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