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I recently purchased a 4-year lease returned Range Rover from a Land Rover dealership. It’s a 2010 Range Rover HSE with 53,000 miles. The vehicle has been regularly serviced by Land Rover at 15k, 30k and 45k. After taking delivery, I noticed an intermittent vibration in the gas pedal. It only happens after the car is fully warmed up (over 20 minutes of driving) and on the freeway. When it occurs, there’s a vibration in the gas pedal and a gentle vibration throughout the vehicle. It only happens in 6[SUP]th[/SUP] gear at exactly 2,000 rpm and 70 mph. It happens under light throttle application. If I downshift to 5[SUP]th[/SUP] or 4[SUP]th[/SUP], the vibration disappears. If I let off the gas pedal, the vibration also disappears. The vibration is subtle to the point that my passengers have not noticed it. Aside from the vibration, the vehicle doesn’t display any other symptoms. The RPM is rock steady and there’s no slipping. The strange part is once the vibration starts, it will be there for a few seconds or up to a minute or two and then disappear.

I’ve done a lot of research on this forum regarding this issue and found that some members have been experiencing very similar issues for over 50,000 miles without it getting worse. I’ve also found a very informative YouTube video about a “Discovery 3 Megaflush” that talks about the shudder at 70mph and how Land Rover recommends a double flush. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y7Q-GxOVnks I apologize for the long background but this is what led me to do the complete transmission fluid flush. My thinking was since the vibration/shudder only happens after the car is fully warmed up, maybe it’s the low viscosity (for better fuel-efficiency) Lifegaurd 6 fluid getting too thin once it’s warmed up. Perhaps the friction modifiers in the Lifeguard 6 are worn out, causing the lock-up clutch and friction plates to chatter. So, two weeks ago, I did a drain and fill with 5.25 quarts of Mercon SP and thought it reduced the vibration/shudder very slightly. The drain and fill definitely made the shifts much smoother. My hope for doing the complete flush was to completely eliminate the vibration/shudder. However, it didn’t work. It’s still there!

Onto the transmission flush…

Tools needed:
10mm socket
8mm deep socket
10mm ratchet wrench
8mm ratchet wrench
8mm hex bit
10mm hex bit
Flat head screw driver
Instant read thermometer
10mm impact driver (OPTIONAL but makes taking off and installing plastic covers much faster)

Parts needed:
12 quarts of ATF
8 quart catch container
10 ft of hose (5/8” inside diameter, ¾” outside diameter)
Funnel
Fluid pump
#10 hose clamp

Preparation:
You’ll need a make your own fill tube to fill the transmission as quickly as the transmission pumps fluid out into your catch container. The fill hole on the side of the transmission is 17mm in diameter. I chose to use a ¾” outside diameter vinyl hose (20mm) with an inside diameter of 5/8”. I made mine 4.5 feet long. The hose makes a tight interference fit with the fill hole and is inserted about 1” into the fill hole. It makes a good seal and there’s minimal fluid leak. It leaked approximately 2 ounces of fluid in the course of putting 10 quarts through it. Wrap the tube with a few layers of aluminum foil as it will be in contact with the exhaust pipes. I didn’t think it needed the aluminum foil because the engine was cold and it would only be on for less than a minute. I wrapped it to be safe and I’m glad I did. The exhaust pipe gets hot very fast! It would have melted my fill tube if it wasn’t wrapped.

You’ll also need a catch container that can hold at least 8 quarts. I found one at Walmart for $6. Look for one that is slim and tall as you’ll be using it to measure the amount of fluid coming out. I also purchased a quart sized measuring cup at Walmart for $1. I marked my container for 7 quarts using water and a Sharpie. The reason the catch container is marked is so I know in real-time how much fluid is coming out and if my fill is keeping up. If my fill was not keeping up, I would need to shut off the engine to allow my fill could catch up. I was able to fill 6 quarts while 7 came out so I didn’t need to shut off the engine. I was a little behind but not by much.

The same hose that I used to make my fill tube fit perfectly on the transmission cooler port. I used about 5 ft and connected it to the transmission cooler with a #10 hose clamp.

Procedure:
Step 1: Level the vehicle with ramps or jack stands. I use ramps and the slope of my driveway to get it leveled. I also put jack stands underneath for added safety. Let it sit overnight.

Step 2: Remove plastic cover underneath the engine. There are (6) 10mm screws.

Step 3: Remove front trim piece that covers the front tow hook. On the bottom of the trim piece, you’ll see (4) flat head screws. Give each one a quarter turn. Pull the piece forward to remove.

Step 4: Remove plastic cover under radiator. There are (20) 10mm screws in total. Remove (4) 10mm screws that face towards the front of the vehichle. You’ll need the 10mm ratchet wrench for this. You’ll have to search for the screws as they are wedged between two plastic pieces. Then remove (16) 10mm screws that face towards the ground.

Step 5: Remove heat shield. There are (3) 10mm screws that hold it to the bracket.

Step 6: Remove heat shield bracket. There are (4) 8mm screws that hold the bracket to the transmission. One of the screws is blocked by the transmission shift cable. You’ll need to move the cable out of the way by removing (2) 8mm screws. Use the 8mm deep socket on these screws and make sure to replace these two screws once you get the bracket screw out. Use the 8mm ratcheting wrench to remove the (3) remaining screws.

Step 7: Break open the transmission fill plug with 8mm hex bit. Do not remove yet, we are just making sure we can get it off before we drain the fluid. It’s on the passenger side of the transmission. Towards the rear, about 1” above the pan.

Step 8: Remove transmission drain plug with 10mm hex bit. As you turn counter-clockwise to loosen, you’ll hear a clicking noise that you’ve never heard before and you’ll think something is wrong. Don’t worry and just keep turning counter-clock wise. As the screw comes out, the clicking noise and resistance associated with it will diminish. I drained 5.25 quarts by letting it sit overnight for 15 hours.

Step 9: Pull transmission return line from the transmission cooler. For my 2010, it was the driver side hose. It’s a quick disconnect fitting. Push the hose in, push the plastic in, pull back. Let the fluid drain out of the cooler and hose. About a quarter quart came out of mine. The cooler port is 14mm diameter with a raised rib that is 18mm (both measured with a caliper). I used a 5/8” inner diameter hose with an outside diameter of ¾” with a #10 hose clamp. Run this hose to a catch container.

Step 10: Connect your pre-made fill tube to the transmission fill hole. Have a helper pour 3 quarts of ATF into the transmission. This brings the fluid level up the fill plug. This is as much as you can put in without starting the engine. You should be underneath the car watching the fill tube and making sure it’s not leaking.

Step 11: You have about 1 minute to complete this step. We’ll be turning on the engine and filling the transmission while the transmission pumps out the oil fluid into our catch container. Open 7 quarts of ATF and have it ready. Have your helper start pouring transmission fluid while you start the engine. After the engine is started, you’ll want to quickly check to make sure your fill tube is not leaking and that all of the fluid being pour is going into the transmission. You’re helper should be pouring transmission fluid as quickly as he can. Since we drained 5.25 quarts out already, there’s should only be about 5 quarts left in the torque converter. When your catch container reaches 6 quarts, shut off the engine.

Step 12: Reconnect the transmission hose. Remove your fill tube.

Step 13: Now we need to get the transmission fluid to the correct level. The correct level is when the transmission fluid trickles out of the fill hole between 104-122 degrees Fahrenheit. Estimate how much fluid came out and plan on putting that much in minus ½ quart after you start the engine. The minus ½ quart is so fluid doesn’t trickle out before 104 degrees. Turn on your engine. Shift to “P” and “R” a few time while pausing for 3 seconds in each gear. Pump fluid in until you are ½ short of what came out. It took my transmission 20 minutes to reach 104 degrees. Insert your instant read thermometer into the fill hole. You’ll want to tip in down so it’s submerged in the transmission fluid to get the most accurate reading. If you don’t tip it down, it’s taking the air temp inside the transmission and I found it to be a few degrees lower. So having the transmission fluid close to the correct level serves two purposes. First if you have too much, it will start trickling out before 104 degrees. Second, it lets you take more accurate readings with the thermometer. When the transmission fluid temperature reaches 104, pump in your ATF until it trickles out and install the fill plug. You’re done!
There’s a few ways to check the temperature of the transmission. Land Rover hooks the vehicle up to their computer that reads the transmission temperature. Many people use an IR heat gun and take the pan temperature. I decided to use a temperature probe as I felt this was the most accurate means that I had available. I tested the IR heat gun method and found it inaccurate. I had my thermometer inside and while I was waiting, I checked the pan with an IR heat gun. I found the pan heats up much faster than the internal fluid. I think it absorbs a lot of heat from the transmission housing. The housing temperature got to the high 100’s very quickly. However, when the fluid temperature got to 104 on my thermometer, the pan was right around the same temperature.

Step 14: Take it for a test drive and install the bracket, heat shield and plastic covers.
 

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2006-2009 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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Wow! Very well done!
 

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2002-2005 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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Great Info...

Years ago I had a similar issue with my BMW 850Ci with the same symptoms - but only in 5th gear (only 5 gears in this ZF tranny) - long story short, I ended up contacting a technician at ZF and he was almost certain that there was a loose clutch seal in 5th gear causing the vibrations - again, only occurs when keeping steady speed - even accelerating in 5th gear will cause the vibration to disappear and of course does not happen in the first 4 gears. Technician stated that there's no significant damage going on but wear and tear will eventually require a rebuild - it's been 4 1/2 years now and even though I don't drive it much, the vibration is still there - maybe a little louder - but for me not worth the rebuild at this time...now it sounds like low end bass speakers when I do hear the vibration....maybe similar issue to your RR?
 

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I recently purchased a 4-year lease returned Range Rover from a Land Rover dealership. It’s a 2010 Range Rover HSE with 53,000 miles. The vehicle has been regularly serviced by Land Rover at 15k, 30k and 45k. After taking delivery, I noticed an intermittent vibration in the gas pedal. It only happens after the car is fully warmed up (over 20 minutes of driving) and on the freeway. When it occurs, there’s a vibration in the gas pedal and a gentle vibration throughout the vehicle. It only happens in 6[SUP]th[/SUP] gear at exactly 2,000 rpm and 70 mph. It happens under light throttle application. If I downshift to 5[SUP]th[/SUP] or 4[SUP]th[/SUP], the vibration disappears. If I let off the gas pedal, the vibration also disappears. The vibration is subtle to the point that my passengers have not noticed it. Aside from the vibration, the vehicle doesn’t display any other symptoms. The RPM is rock steady and there’s no slipping. The strange part is once the vibration starts, it will be there for a few seconds or up to a minute or two and then disappear.

I’ve done a lot of research on this forum regarding this issue and found that some members have been experiencing very similar issues for over 50,000 miles without it getting worse. I’ve also found a very informative YouTube video about a “Discovery 3 Megaflush” that talks about the shudder at 70mph and how Land Rover recommends a double flush.
I apologize for the long background but this is what led me to do the complete transmission fluid flush. My thinking was since the vibration/shudder only happens after the car is fully warmed up, maybe it’s the low viscosity (for better fuel-efficiency) Lifegaurd 6 fluid getting too thin once it’s warmed up. Perhaps the friction modifiers in the Lifeguard 6 are worn out, causing the lock-up clutch and friction plates to chatter. So, two weeks ago, I did a drain and fill with 5.25 quarts of Mercon SP and thought it reduced the vibration/shudder very slightly. The drain and fill definitely made the shifts much smoother. My hope for doing the complete flush was to completely eliminate the vibration/shudder. However, it didn’t work. It’s still there!

Onto the transmission flush…

Tools needed:
10mm socket
8mm deep socket
10mm ratchet wrench
8mm ratchet wrench
8mm hex bit
10mm hex bit
Flat head screw driver
Instant read thermometer
10mm impact driver (OPTIONAL but makes taking off and installing plastic covers much faster)

Parts needed:
12 quarts of ATF
8 quart catch container
10 ft of hose (5/8” inside diameter, ¾” outside diameter)
Funnel
Fluid pump
#10 hose clamp

Preparation:
You’ll need a make your own fill tube to fill the transmission as quickly as the transmission pumps fluid out into your catch container. The fill hole on the side of the transmission is 17mm in diameter. I chose to use a ¾” outside diameter vinyl hose (20mm) with an inside diameter of 5/8”. I made mine 4.5 feet long. The hose makes a tight interference fit with the fill hole and is inserted about 1” into the fill hole. It makes a good seal and there’s minimal fluid leak. It leaked approximately 2 ounces of fluid in the course of putting 10 quarts through it. Wrap the tube with a few layers of aluminum foil as it will be in contact with the exhaust pipes. I didn’t think it needed the aluminum foil because the engine was cold and it would only be on for less than a minute. I wrapped it to be safe and I’m glad I did. The exhaust pipe gets hot very fast! It would have melted my fill tube if it wasn’t wrapped.

You’ll also need a catch container that can hold at least 8 quarts. I found one at Walmart for $6. Look for one that is slim and tall as you’ll be using it to measure the amount of fluid coming out. I also purchased a quart sized measuring cup at Walmart for $1. I marked my container for 7 quarts using water and a Sharpie. The reason the catch container is marked is so I know in real-time how much fluid is coming out and if my fill is keeping up. If my fill was not keeping up, I would need to shut off the engine to allow my fill could catch up. I was able to fill 6 quarts while 7 came out so I didn’t need to shut off the engine. I was a little behind but not by much.

The same hose that I used to make my fill tube fit perfectly on the transmission cooler port. I used about 5 ft and connected it to the transmission cooler with a #10 hose clamp.

Procedure:
Step 1: Level the vehicle with ramps or jack stands. I use ramps and the slope of my driveway to get it leveled. I also put jack stands underneath for added safety. Let it sit overnight.

Step 2: Remove plastic cover underneath the engine. There are (6) 10mm screws.

Step 3: Remove front trim piece that covers the front tow hook. On the bottom of the trim piece, you’ll see (4) flat head screws. Give each one a quarter turn. Pull the piece forward to remove.

Step 4: Remove plastic cover under radiator. There are (20) 10mm screws in total. Remove (4) 10mm screws that face towards the front of the vehichle. You’ll need the 10mm ratchet wrench for this. You’ll have to search for the screws as they are wedged between two plastic pieces. Then remove (16) 10mm screws that face towards the ground.

Step 5: Remove heat shield. There are (3) 10mm screws that hold it to the bracket.

Step 6: Remove heat shield bracket. There are (4) 8mm screws that hold the bracket to the transmission. One of the screws is blocked by the transmission shift cable. You’ll need to move the cable out of the way by removing (2) 8mm screws. Use the 8mm deep socket on these screws and make sure to replace these two screws once you get the bracket screw out. Use the 8mm ratcheting wrench to remove the (3) remaining screws.

Step 7: Break open the transmission fill plug with 8mm hex bit. Do not remove yet, we are just making sure we can get it off before we drain the fluid. It’s on the passenger side of the transmission. Towards the rear, about 1” above the pan.

Step 8: Remove transmission drain plug with 10mm hex bit. As you turn counter-clockwise to loosen, you’ll hear a clicking noise that you’ve never heard before and you’ll think something is wrong. Don’t worry and just keep turning counter-clock wise. As the screw comes out, the clicking noise and resistance associated with it will diminish. I drained 5.25 quarts by letting it sit overnight for 15 hours.

Step 9: Pull transmission return line from the transmission cooler. For my 2010, it was the driver side hose. It’s a quick disconnect fitting. Push the hose in, push the plastic in, pull back. Let the fluid drain out of the cooler and hose. About a quarter quart came out of mine. The cooler port is 14mm diameter with a raised rib that is 18mm (both measured with a caliper). I used a 5/8” inner diameter hose with an outside diameter of ¾” with a #10 hose clamp. Run this hose to a catch container.

Step 10: Connect your pre-made fill tube to the transmission fill hole. Have a helper pour 3 quarts of ATF into the transmission. This brings the fluid level up the fill plug. This is as much as you can put in without starting the engine. You should be underneath the car watching the fill tube and making sure it’s not leaking.

Step 11: You have about 1 minute to complete this step. We’ll be turning on the engine and filling the transmission while the transmission pumps out the oil fluid into our catch container. Open 7 quarts of ATF and have it ready. Have your helper start pouring transmission fluid while you start the engine. After the engine is started, you’ll want to quickly check to make sure your fill tube is not leaking and that all of the fluid being pour is going into the transmission. You’re helper should be pouring transmission fluid as quickly as he can. Since we drained 5.25 quarts out already, there’s should only be about 5 quarts left in the torque converter. When your catch container reaches 6 quarts, shut off the engine.

Step 12: Reconnect the transmission hose. Remove your fill tube.

Step 13: Now we need to get the transmission fluid to the correct level. The correct level is when the transmission fluid trickles out of the fill hole between 104-122 degrees Fahrenheit. Estimate how much fluid came out and plan on putting that much in minus ½ quart after you start the engine. The minus ½ quart is so fluid doesn’t trickle out before 104 degrees. Turn on your engine. Shift to “P” and “R” a few time while pausing for 3 seconds in each gear. Pump fluid in until you are ½ short of what came out. It took my transmission 20 minutes to reach 104 degrees. Insert your instant read thermometer into the fill hole. You’ll want to tip in down so it’s submerged in the transmission fluid to get the most accurate reading. If you don’t tip it down, it’s taking the air temp inside the transmission and I found it to be a few degrees lower. So having the transmission fluid close to the correct level serves two purposes. First if you have too much, it will start trickling out before 104 degrees. Second, it lets you take more accurate readings with the thermometer. When the transmission fluid temperature reaches 104, pump in your ATF until it trickles out and install the fill plug. You’re done!
There’s a few ways to check the temperature of the transmission. Land Rover hooks the vehicle up to their computer that reads the transmission temperature. Many people use an IR heat gun and take the pan temperature. I decided to use a temperature probe as I felt this was the most accurate means that I had available. I tested the IR heat gun method and found it inaccurate. I had my thermometer inside and while I was waiting, I checked the pan with an IR heat gun. I found the pan heats up much faster than the internal fluid. I think it absorbs a lot of heat from the transmission housing. The housing temperature got to the high 100’s very quickly. However, when the fluid temperature got to 104 on my thermometer, the pan was right around the same temperature.

Step 14: Take it for a test drive and install the bracket, heat shield and plastic covers.
Did using Mercon ATF work well in the long term for the RR transmission?
 

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Now we need to get the transmission fluid to the correct level. The correct level is when the transmission fluid trickles out of the fill hole between 104-122 degrees Fahrenheit.
I just completed a transmission fluid change, last step is to check correct fluid level. Where did you get the temp range to use for checking fluid level, my research says between 85-105 Fahrenheit for ZF 6HP

 
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