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1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
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Discussion Starter #1
Just a quick sanity check: it’s not ok if the hose that goes to the distributor vacuum advance has free flow, right? If I detach it from the throttle body and blow or suck through it, air flows both ways.

I do need to replace my distributor diaphragm, right? Can I do that without installing a whole new distributor? Can it be done with the distributor in site? I’d like to avoid to mess with the timing.
Thanks
 

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Yes, I've got it the same as you. If you suck on the tube with distributor cap removed you can see the mec move as you do it.

The vac unit usually just fixes on the outside with a little lever going in through the casing to pull the trigger plate round. Think you can detach in situ, fiddly if you drop the fixing screws though ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #3
One of the two screws seems easy enough in situ, the other one not so much. I remember once I found it loose and had to invent a tool to do it (I took a torx bit, a 7mm wrench and Joined them with some electrical tape), I have to decide wether to tackle it myself or get a mechanic to do it.

Good to know that once the screws are off, it’s free and there’s no need to reach in from above, thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Very helpful and rare pic JS5D, thanks! So it’s just a matter of disengaging the arm by prying it downwards away from a pin, right?
 

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You can remove the dizzy without having to retime anything. Just make an alignment mark on base of the dizzy shaft at the timing plate cover with a sharpie and the rotor position on the edge of body where it points. Pull the dizzy out, do the work, put it back. It will be easier and less likely to mess it up. It will go back in meshed to the gears like it was never removed. The rotor, since it is keyed, will end up pointing to the mark for verification.
 

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Hi Tex, correct on my Land Rover/Lucas distributor the vacuum advance it just slides on the pin.

and yes you can remove and replace using markings and it be pretty darn close the biggest risk being skipping a tooth and being way off. Rotate engine to TDC on the marks and rotor pointing to nr1 and you should be able to spot any major misalignment issues.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Great JS5D,I'm building up the confidence to do it:)
So if I unbolt the dizzy I can just lift it straight up, and to refit it it'll just slide down? as lon as the crank doesn't move from the TDC position, the gear that meshes with the dizzy won't move?

To identify the TDC can I just look at the markings on the pulley and the dizzy rotor arm or should I actually stick something into the #1 cylinder plug hole?
 

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When I pull my dizzy... I mark where the rotor is pointing... I mark the plastic
That covers the inner working of the distributor... I turn the dizzy all the way in one direction then mark the rotor...
So when you reinstall the dizzy you can put it back where it was... then all you have to do is set the timeing...
you can also mark the dizzy on the motor to return it to it timeing position....
This method works for me...
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Great, sounds easy enough. Thanks!
 

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Be careful.., remember don’t turn the motor with the dizzy out...,
Just sayin
 

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Great, sounds easy enough. Thanks!
It will all fall into place as you work on it with the good advice posted already.

Just to add something, as you lift the distributor up from it's running position in withdrawing it from the motor, you'll see the rotor arm rotate as the gear driving it is a helix. Watch this and observe where it finishes as it comes free as it will be the place where you set the rotor to when you put it back in to reinstall the unit. It's simple and you'll see it happen as you do it.
What it means is when you go to put it back in, you don't position the rotor where you need to end up but it will arrive there just as the unit seats back down.
It's harder to describe than watching it with hands on, but gets missed sometimes.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
You described it perfectly, it makes total sense. I'll also leave it in neutral and detach the battery so there's no way the engine will turn over.

Which shaft does the dizzy mesh with inside the engine? is it the camshaft or is it some other shaft?
 

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It also drives the oil pump...
At the bottom of the dizzy there is a slot on the bottom of the gear..it fits together with the oil pump drive
Sometimes you have to turn it a bit to get it to slide in
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Oh I see, so the dizzy shaft connects the camshaft and the oil pump. Didn't know that, this V8 thing is all new to me, thanks.

So if I have to move it a bit, I guess I have to move the engine from the pulley, right?
 

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Nooooo, don't turn the crankshaft after you've set it initially.

Distributor drive from camshaft is via a pair of helix gears, so you can just be X number of teeth out and with the rotor showing you you've got it wrong, you then just pull it out again and try again at another tooth displacement till you see the rotor back where it was before you started. This relies on you leaving the engine in the position you started with during the whole sequence and until you are happy with your re-install work.

The oil pump drive is via an extension of the distributor spindle that goes past the cam gear drive. It consists of a big flat screwdriver type blade on the oil pump spindle that engages in a slot on the bottom of the distributor shaft. If nothing has moved from taking the distributor out it should just slot back in. But if not, wriggle the rotor with your fingers as you push the distributor downward the last bit. If that doesn't work, with distributor out you can look down the hole to see the oil pump blade and turn it a bit with an improvised "pointy thing" don't put a socket down there and drop it!!! There's quite a bit of leeway on this oil pump drive and they usually go back in without problem. The oil pump has no timing so you're free to rotate that, it just has to mate with the slot in base of distributor.

One last detail, the distributor shank has an o-ring seal up near the clamped face. This offers some resistance to you pushing the distributor home that can be confused with misalignment, it doesn't need to be tapped but a firm push is usually required.
 

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Nooooo, don't turn the crankshaft after you've set it initially.

Distributor drive from camshaft is via a pair of helix gears, so you can just be X number of teeth out and with the rotor showing you you've got it wrong, you then just pull it out again and try again at another tooth displacement till you see the rotor back where it was before you started. This relies on you leaving the engine in the position you started with during the whole sequence and until you are happy with your re-install work.

The oil pump drive is via an extension of the distributor spindle that goes past the cam gear drive. It consists of a big flat screwdriver type blade on the oil pump spindle that engages in a slot on the bottom of the distributor shaft. If nothing has moved from taking the distributor out it should just slot back in. But if not, wriggle the rotor with your fingers as you push the distributor downward the last bit. If that doesn't work, with distributor out you can look down the hole to see the oil pump blade and turn it a bit with an improvised "pointy thing" don't put a socket down there and drop it!!! There's quite a bit of leeway on this oil pump drive and they usually go back in without problem. The oil pump has no timing so you're free to rotate that, it just has to mate with the slot in base of distributor.

One last detail, the distributor shank has an o-ring seal up near the clamped face. This offers some resistance to you pushing the distributor home that can be confused with misalignment, it doesn't need to be tapped but a firm push is usually required.
agreed after distributor is out ... in no way move anything in the motor....
What I do to turn the oil pump drive shaft ... which is Totally independent
From the motor ...I take a wooden dowel about the size of a bird perch and cut a short slot in the bottom..,
So if I need to turn the shaft it fits on the top and I can give it a turn ... usually like a very small tweak .. if at
all...Just be careful... don’t get in a hurry... if you get frustrated..
Walk away and gather your thoughts..
You don’t want to cause a problem while your trying to fix one...
This is what I do when dealing with the demon that is my rover....
 

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I found that my 3/8" socket extension will engage nicely with the pump shaft when inserted backwards (female side in). Obviously just use the long extension no sockets to lose in there. I used it once or twice to prime the oil pump after rebuild/inspection.

However with careful removal and reinserting a distributor there should be no reason to have to align the pump shaft.
 
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