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Discussion Starter #1
I am trying to figure out what I need to get to connect my 2004 Range Rover to my laptop to read EAS codes and reset them, do calibration, etc. It seems like a lot of people like the Faultmate MSV2 but this seems ridiculously expensive. I could just get a dedicated EAS but this will only clear faults, nothing else. I would rather get the MSV2 nano and get software as needed if I ever wanted to control other things but the BBS website is a nightmare, I cannot determine which items I would need to see if it is worthwhile to get the software modules adhoc vs as the VIN locked bundle which covers everything. I assume the device itself isn't VIN locked since it is only the software modules which seem to matter... so is it also possible to mix/match and purchase one multi-vehicle module so I could use it with possible future vehicles but still get some VIN locked ones?

Are there other alternatives which aren't so expensive? Does anyone know if specs exist which could be used to write my own software (I am a software engineer)?
 

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There is already free software available for the EAS system.If you just read a bit further down the posts you see posts refering to this very same soft :roll: ware
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I see that there is an open source product for EAS but it appears to only support p38a and classic range rovers. Mine is a 2004 L322 model. I suppose perhaps I should ask a more specific question:

Is the Faultmate Nano vehicle server (the hardware bit) just an OBD II scanner, or is there some other protocol which must be decoded (I guess 2005 and onwards uses CAN as well but mine is a 2004)? If it is just a scanner, then why wouldn't any OBD II scanner work as long as I could find/write software to read the ODB II protocol?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I found this tool http://www.scantool.net/scan-tools/pc-based/obdlink.html called OBDLink, it supports USB and Bluetooth... says it works with ALL obd II compliant vehicles and works with any ELM 327 based software. Sounds like a winner to me. I think the ELM 327 is fairly well known, seems possible that I would be able to write my own software for whatever I need to do.

Anyone have any experience with one of these?
 

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I find it amusing that people buy a £50,000 car then expect to get diagnostic kit for £10.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
allyv8 said:
I find it amusing that people buy a £50,000 car then expect to get diagnostic kit for £10.
Actually, its got nothing to do with the cost of the vehicle (although I paid a LOT less than that for mine) but I'm a software engineer so I know how trivial it is to interface with hardware such as the pieces you would normally find in a vehicle. Most people do not find it so trivial though, hence the high prices people are willing to pay for software.
 

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but I'm a software engineer so I know how trivial it is to interface with hardware such as the pieces you would normally find in a vehicle
This bloody hilarious :D :D :D Maaate... if it's so trivial...why consult this forum :?:

I spent 15 odd years alongside s/w engineers in the aerospace industry... most of them were trying to " interface" something or other with something else... I While I respected most, I also learned that you could always tell a certain type of s/w engineer... but you couldn't tell'em much :shock: :D

this stuff is not trivial... but go ahead! deconstruct the system, the algorithms, the timing etc etc, work out where the OTHER software writers "hid" stuff to protect the product from intrepid seekers of truth such as people on this forum... I eagerly await your complete RR2004 package for, let's say $10?
 

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I think the blank post from Colin (BBS Spy) was just to show his jaw dropping at the comment. :think:

I do beleive Colin spent some 5 years developing the first aftermarket software and hardware for Land Rovers. I think his unit (Rovacom???) at the time cost something like $10000AUD which was 1/3rd the cost of Testbook. Yet it could do more.

For the P38 range rovers it allow you to change any setting availably anywhere on the vehicle, where as testbook and several others could only change market then automatically program all other settings.

I would be very careful what you say around here :naughty: , as you could offend some people that have done wonders/miracles for the rangerover community. These people have made it feasible to actually own one of these vehicles outside the warranty period. :thumb:

Stu
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Hoges said:
but I'm a software engineer so I know how trivial it is to interface with hardware such as the pieces you would normally find in a vehicle
This bloody hilarious :D :D :D Maaate... if it's so trivial...why consult this forum :?:

I spent 15 odd years alongside s/w engineers in the aerospace industry... most of them were trying to " interface" something or other with something else... I While I respected most, I also learned that you could always tell a certain type of s/w engineer... but you couldn't tell'em much :shock: :D

this stuff is not trivial... but go ahead! deconstruct the system, the algorithms, the timing etc etc, work out where the OTHER software writers "hid" stuff to protect the product from intrepid seekers of truth such as people on this forum... I eagerly await your complete RR2004 package for, let's say $10?
I didn't say it would be trivial in the case of a range rover (which has MORE electronics than the average vehicle). Nor did I say that the entire functionality would be trivial. All I said was that the interface itself should be easy. I'm not some amateur, I do know what I'm talking about (general software knowledge, not cars specifically, i don't actually own any OBD II interface, etc and haven't played with vehicle diagnostics before). I didn't mean to offend anyone, I was talking in software terms, and in software an interface doesn't DO anything, doesn't ACCOMPLISH anything. You still need to implement the functionality (and parts of the functionality are certainly easier than others). Talking to the interface should be easy (assuming there is a spec, which it seems like there must not be since everyone is laughing at me), but getting it to do what you want may be another story entirely... I figured since this is a forum dedicated to the topic there would be other programmers on this forum who like to share information about this sort of thing, but perhaps I was mistaken.

I merely thought that if I only wanted to do one thing, such as clear a fault, it may be possible to do that one thing without paying for a whole package full of bells and whistles which I may never use (attempting to perform certain repairs myself would be penny wise but pound foolish). I just asked a simple question and I haven't really gotten an answer, just ridicule.

Does anyone here know if it is theoretically POSSIBLE given plenty of time and expertise to control all aspects of a 2004 range rover using any generic OBD II computer interface, or if there is stuff that is totally non-standard which uses completely different protocols? Some people say that the communications are encrypted, etc, etc... which if true seems like it would be essentially impossible for ANYONE depending on the type of encryption used... yet there are people who have created software packages, so either it is weak encryption, or there are keys, etc available.

Any information would be appeciated, I am basically trying to decide which hardware I should buy in order to begin my work. I understand that it may take years, but I plan to own my RR for a very long time, so I have years to work with.
 

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That being the case,and you being a clever software engineer,simple maths says it would be far more cost effective to just buy one of Colins systems and engjoy its functionality - and spend your time doing other software stuff you get an hourly rate/salary from.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Hmm, I keep doing more research, and the further I get the more I realize this isn't nearly as straight forward as I thought. Most likely, in order to actually do what I was thinking, I'll need to have access to the real dealer equipment and spare ECU parts, etc in order to do testing and I would basically need to reverse engineer everything that is not mandated by the government to be open and accessible (which is probably at least 75% of the RR). Not impossible, but the hours involved will be far more than I first thought, and would require massive investment up front to do it (more than the cost of my vehicle probably). In order to do it in a reasonable amount of time I would probably need to do it as a business, not a hobby.

It is a bit of a shame, since I have access to a complete shop with lifts, tools, and everything, but they just don't have any computer diagnostic equipment for RR which severely limits the possibilities. Until I win the lottery and have lots of extra money to burn, I guess I'll stick with independent mechanics (I am fortunate to live near a well known one) and maybe get an MSV-2 or Hawkeye...
 
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