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2006-2009 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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Discussion Starter #1
rubber seal inside diff.JPG inside diff.JPG support half shaft.JPG tools .jpg insert half shaft.JPG insert half shaft 2.JPG clamp tool.JPG
I had a hole in the CV boot so just replaced the 2 boots.
STEPS

  1. Jack car and take tyre off, release steak nut locking device (half shaft retaining nut) with screw driver/chisel and pound hammer taking care not to damage axel thread. Must have a 12point M36, 1/2” socket to undo the steak nut and tighten the new steak nut to spec. You will need the biggest breaker bar you can get (long piece of pipe to fit over drive) to release nut and discard the nut.
  2. Release stabiliser link 18m
  3. Unscrew break hose clamps to loosen from suspension
  4. Release wires from wheel (leaving only break cable in place and be careful not to stretch when doing work)
  5. Release 2 x handbrake cable/supports
  6. Undo toe arm with 22m and 10ml spanners
  7. Undo and remove shock absorber bolt at bottom arm.
  8. Undo bolt on lower arm bush and tap out bolt
  9. Take off half shaft from wheel hub and support wheel hub at the bottom whilst supporting half shaft so that it does not damage the seal in the differential. Careful not to put too much pressure on break cable, my break cable was tight so I couldn’t pivot wheel hub very much. I removed wheel hub by tapping back of wheel hub with pound hammer but in future I would consider getting hold of wheel hub puller tool or make a tool myself.
  10. I attempted to remove the CV from the half shaft at the wheel hub end without pulling the half shaft from the differential housing, however there was not enough room to get the force required to remove the CV.
  11. As I know now, it is much easier to remove the half shaft from the differential housing with assistance in order to keep it level so as not to damage the seal in the differential housing, the seal is at the very front edge (I didn’t replace the seal but of course you could replace the seal if leaking). To remove the half shaft from the differential housing do it in two stages. First, from the differential housing I placed a piece of timber onto the CV housing where CV goes into the differential and gave it a good firm hit with a pound hammer and you will feel it click and release the snap ring which is at the bottom of the half shaft inside the differential housing. When released, the half shaft came out about ½” and is OK to sit until you can reset to remove half shaft completely without damaging the seal. Second, carefully remove half shaft completely from differential housing by keeping it straight (need two people) so it won’t damage the differential seal which is located at the entry point of the differential housing. Make sure you remove without letting shaft touch the rubber seal as any damage will cause a leak. See photo of seal.
  12. With shaft on the bench, cut off 2 clamps on CV boot (careful not to damage CV when cutting) and cut off boot (if reusing boot, slide it down the half shaft in order to access CV).
  13. Remove CV from half shaft by placing half shaft in vice. I used a coal chisel and pound hammer hitting CV at a point closest to the half shaft without scratching the half shaft. Takes quite a bit of force to remove CV. It needed a good sharp hit to release.
  14. The manual says to remove the snap ring however I would not do this step in the future, leave the old snap ring in place if it is not damaged.
  15. At this point you can also remove the other CV clamps and boot.
  16. Clean the CV’s with petrol to get rid of old grease and repack with grease.
  17. Replace CV boots, differential end first. The CV Boot Kit I purchased comes with 2 CV boots, 4 Oetiker clamps and 2 snap rings. The CV boots are different size so be sure to attach largest one to differential end of half shaft and smaller one to wheel end of half shaft. You need a Oetiker style clamping tool to install CV clamps. For wheel end CV boot, place smaller clamp on first then put CV boot on, then CV joint. When I tried to replace the CV, it smashed the new snap ring and I had to use the old snap ring. To get the CV joint on, I made a shim by cutting a thin piece of steel placing it around the snap ring securing it down with wire in order keep the snap ring snug down in the grove and in order to allow the CV to slide back over the snap ring without damaging the snap ring. I taped the CV on using a piece of hardwood and pound hammer giving it a good sharp hit. This pushed the steel shim away but the CV joint went over the snap ring at the same time.
  18. If you aren’t a confident DIYer, I would take out the half shaft from the differential and take it to a work shop for replacement of new CVs and or CV boots.
  19. Replace half shaft into differential being careful not to place the shaft on the seal which is located at the front of the entry point into the differential. Best with two people in order to keep shaft straight and direct it into the differential without touching the seal.
  20. Once the half shaft is in differential housing it rests on the inner part of the differential without touching the seal so it is possible to support the half shaft with a piece of wood to keep in in place while you prepare to tap it in so the snap ring seats in place inside the differential. See photo.
  21. I tapped the half shaft into the differential by placing a large steel hose clamp (110ml) behind the CV boot at the differential end (there is a slight depression) and using a cut down long piece of pipe placed pipe on the depression against the screw part of the hose clamp and tapped the pipe with a pound hammer placing the pressure on the CV not so much on the hose clamp. The hose clamp only holds the pipe in the depression. I also cut down and placed a piece of PVC pipe over the CV boot to protect it in case the pipe came off and damaged the boot. See photos.
  22. Now just replace all components in reverse. If needed you could also replace the 2 bushes and toe arm.
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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316 Posts
What year car is this?

PS: I have friends from British Columbia who recently arrived in the marina in Coffs Harbour. If you happen to have a boat there look for Wayne and Judy on the sailboat "Cursiositas".
 

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2006-2009 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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What are people's thoughts on using the special tools listed in RAVE for CV removal/installation? I'm looking at replacing a LH front halfshaft CV-axle-assembly and am not sure about being able to do it without potential damage to the surrounding parts by whacking and prying, etc... .

The main areas I'm wondering about are the inner CV joint connecting to the differential, as well as removing *and* installing the outer CV from the wheel hub. Additionally, does anyone know if when replacing, does the halfshaft seal need to be replaced, too? The RAVE often talks about "discarding" which can be confusing. I think they sometimes mean "move it out of the way" and other times it's "throw it away and get a new one."

Edit: for example, when installing the halfshaft I came across this part (https://jlrequipment.service-solutions.com/en-GB/Pages/ItemDetail.aspx?SKU=204-506-01) that is an installer tool at the wheel location. The right hand side of that tool when looking at the picture is a little "cup" of sorts and screws onto the shaft/axle (?) and pulls it through kinda. Seems to me that wouldn't be necessary, as you could just push it on in there, but, of course, these things are easier said than done sometimes. Going by Silver Hornet's post here, though, he doesn't mention anything of the sort, which is fairly encouraging.
 

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2002-2005 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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350 Posts
ZoomD - I assume your year and model is the 2008 in your signature. What I write applies to the 2004, but I don't think there is much of a difference.

I used a gear puller and some lug nuts and used that to push the CV out of the knuckle. When I helped my mechanic swap engines he just hit it with an air hammer in the middle and it pushed it right out. What took me hours took him 15 seconds. Granted now knowing how to do it with my gear puller it may take 20 minutes.

Putting it back in the hub was a total bear. The first time I did it I pulled back the boot and hammered "smartly" on the sides of the CV until it was in far enough for the axle nut to pull it the rest of the way. This was not easy. If you try hitting the boot you will destroy it. I know as I did it. My mechanic also did it b/c it came back after the engine transplant with a nipped boot. The way I finally solved pulling it back on and keeping the boot intact was to use a high grade 10mm bolt that threads into the center of the axle. Then with various sockets and a metal plate that covers the outside of the hub I was able to pull it through. You need at least one bolt here. This worked slick. I don't know if the 2008 has this threaded end. Some people have no issues with this step and the CV just slides right in the hub. As Rover has a special tool, I assume not all slide right it.

Go out to your car and have a look. Post some pictures and I can comment if it will work. The only word of warning here is if you use an air hammer and have that threaded hole do not damage the threads or my trick to get it back on will not work.

For the inboard side, the above post method should work. On mine I just found a spot and angle on the inboard side I could get a flat on and hit it hard with a sledge hammer. It came out without issue. Basically the same technique used on most cars I have done.

Regarding the seal, you can install a new one like any other seal. Tap it in, keep is straight, drive it to the right depth. The special tool just makes it easier. Also be aware the splines could damage the seal as they pass through - so lube them up, maybe use the thin bottle trick (some seals have a removable protective sleeve) and keep the axle straight. If you are confident on your ability to put a new seal in I would urge you to replace it. If it starts leaking you will have to repeat most of the process. For the price of a seal it is not worth it.
 

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2006-2009 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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Thanks for the reply kg74.

Yes, I've got the assembly out and the new one in at the differential side (which was surprisingly easy; just kinda slid on in there with a little muscle. I think I got a little lucky with that circlamp/snapring or something), but the wheel side is very, very difficult/tight. Getting it out was pretty tough and took quite the hammering, so getting it back on - stands to reason! - would be equally difficult.

So, it sounds like you made your own tool of sorts for the job? You say 10mm, but that seems really small. The axle shaft, which is what I presume you threaded it onto (and sounds like it's similar to the special tool that some Rover techs use) is bigger than 10mm isn't it? At least on this one (pictures included, but watch out, it's in inches, ack!) it looks like the shaft width is ~12/16th (3/4) - 14/16th (7/8) in inches, which converts to about 19.05mm - 22.23m.

Either way, were you able to source some sort of wrapping-like cup-bolt thing that fit around it AND was thin enough to fit through the hub spline area? That's a good idea and I will be going to the hardware store to see if I can find anything like that, as it didn't occur to me before, but I'm having doubts finding something that could work so well.


cvaxlewidth.jpg cvaxlewidthangle.jpg
 

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2002-2005 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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I used the hole in the middle - does yours have threads? If it is threaded you have to find out what thread screws in there and its pitch. From the picture I cannot tell. On mine it was 10mm bolt head, pitch I don't recall - and yes is small and I snapped a few low grade bolts. That is why I moved to a higher grade bolt and added the extra nuts. You can try tapping yours but don't go too deep and I wouldn't go any wider than needed.

On mine this is how I did it. On the hub side is a large circle lip. I used a thick metal flat with a hole in it that my 10mm bolt went through. The flat sat on the lip both sides, hole centered, slightly larger than 10mm. Put flat on, center, have a nut(s) that fits your 10mm on the bolt. Then thread 10mm nut onto the bolt on the outside of the flat. Bottom out the bolt, then the nut and then turn the bolt so it pulls the axle through the hub. Thinking back - I now remember I used a number of 10mm nuts to keep the bolt from breaking. From time to time as it pulled in I had to add or remove a nut. Once it was pulled through enough to get the axle nut on I used that to pull it the rest of the way.

Does that make sense?
 

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2006-2009 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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Ok, I think I understand what you're describing. The replacement axle I received didn't have a hole where you are describing, just that shallow indentation.

I broke down (figuratively!) and bought the special tool from the link in my first post in this thread. It's being shipped two-day air right now. Pretty expensive, but still cheaper than a mechanic, I guess. :/ I may put it up for sale, too. So if anyone's reading this they can reply to this andor PM me if they're interested.
 

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2002-2005 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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Take some pictures of the tool in action. It looks like the same basic concept, but a metal internally threaded tube which is slightly smaller in diameter than the axle splines is screwed on and then pulled through, rather than what I did which was to thread into the actual axle.

I wonder if one could make the tool out of pipe and tap the appropriate thread and weld on a bolt to help with pulling. Interesting.
 

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  • First, from the differential housing I placed a piece of timber onto the CV housing where CV goes into the differential and gave it a good firm hit with a pound hammer and you will feel it click and release the snap ring which is at the bottom of the half shaft inside the differential housing. When released, the half shaft came out about ½” and is OK to sit until you can reset to remove half shaft completely without damaging the seal.
Did you place the timber on the top of the cv shaft or the bottom of the cv shaft? If I understand correctly, your technique is not prying the cv axle out of the differential housing but instead just hitting the cv axle to release the snap ring. I tried to pry it out with no success.
 
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