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Discussion Starter #1
Its been a while since I've been on here. Happily, it has been mostly because my Rover has been relatively trouble free. But now, what started out as a minor thing has turned major and grounded Rover.

Some time ago I noticed that the coolant level would fall below normal. I would top off and it would last for quite a while. But eventually it would be below normal. I figured it was a minor leak somewhere. But I took the road of simply checking level and adding coolant when needed. This went on fine until, after a 1,000 mile, Rover overheated. My fault. I drove the distance and didn't check levels when I arrived at my destination. At this point I took some time to look for the source of the leak. I found what I thought it was and bought hoses. Back home, with new hose in hand, I looked at the job ahead. It looked like it would be tough. So again, I let things go.

Yesterday, after only a few miles drive away from home, the Rover temp gauge went red-line. I stopped. Added water as an emergency and drove back home. Made it without problem. But once I popped the hood, I saw the leak. Not a hose. Pictures below show the source.

Any one have a leak in this same location? Is it just a gasket gone bad? I tried to get in there to check if the bolt holding this together was loose and couldn't get in there. I may have to turn this over to a mechanic.

Big $$$? Any ideas? Suggestion? Helpful advise? :(





Hose on the left is the one I thought was leaking...


Below is the leak going after just a few minutes of the car running...




My Rover info: 2000 Range Rover SE. 95,000 miles, give or take.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Hey, thanks for the quick reply.
Back when I thought it was the hose leaking, I was told about the by-passing idea. But how would I handle the leak AT the gasket?
...
Oh, and I just found the part you mentioned. That certainly would do the trick. Trouble is, it is in such a difficult location (to me, at least) that I'm not sure I can replace it myself. Although, given my choices, that may be what I will do.
:mrgreen:
I mean, at this point, I would have to have Rover towed to a mechanic anyway. So I might as well try to replace the part myself. If I fail, well, I tow it to someone who can.
Nothing ventured. Nothing gain... as they say. :D

Thanks again for the quick reply.

I'm off to order the part....

Cheers.
 

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Living in Florida you have very little, if any need, for the throttle heater. When they fail up here in the Northwest most folks just bypass them and skip the replacement.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Hmmm... not quite done yet.
I'm trying to understand the function of this part -throttle body/ heater thingy. Am I to understand that one hose, the one I thought had a leak, brings coolant in and the hose next to it returns it to the reservoir, right? And the coolant does some superfluous heating of something in the throttle body and returns to reservoir?
Bypassing it could simply be done AT the reservoir? Nothing needed to be done at the throttle body? :think:

:?:

Just trying to understand. I'm sure I'm sounding like a total dumb ass, but well, in this case, I am. :oops:

Thank you so very much.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
rrtoadhall said:
Living in Florida you have very little, if any need, for the throttle heater. When they fail up here in the Northwest most folks just bypass them and skip the replacement.
Yes. Thanks. I'm reading through RAVE pdf right now trying to figure out how this all works so I can figure out how and WHERE to bypass this thing.
And, well, I'd like to know what is going on with the coolant when it enters the throttle body. Where it goes. How it flows in and out.
 

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Sorry maybe i did not make myself clear :oops: I would just by-pass the body joining up the two pipes. No harm will come if you do.

Ok just seen your post.

The pipes that attach to the body just need connecting together. Simple. In colder climates the air needs alittle warming so the body is part of the cooling system.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
john-sussex said:
Sorry maybe i did not make myself clear :oops: I would just by-pass the body joining up the two pipes. No harm will come if you do.

Ok just seen your post.

The pipes that attach to the body just need connecting together. Simple. In colder climates the air needs a little warming so the body is part of the cooling system.
Great. I'm slowly getting the idea.

Just join hose #3 with #4 from picture below. Join them together, somehow. Easy enough, I suppose. No high pressure issues? I mean, the connection would need to be secure, but no high pressure, special gadget to connect the two, right?



That sure would make things easier. I think.
 

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I had the connector thingy replaced but it started leaking after 6 months.

Difficult to tighten - I was told it has 4 - 4.5 mm bolts ..... but can be done.

I'm sure that there would be no pressure issues if you just join the pipes.

Depends if you ant to keep it original.
 

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the bypass totally remove hose #3, disconnect the throttle body side of hose #4 and connect it to where hose #3 was connected to the engine, now nothing should be connected to the throttle body
 

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I think that ours leaks in the same spot and bought the kit on ebay. The way I have read about doing it [if you do] is to remove the throttle body-access should be easy then. Could anyone confirm the requirement to also have a new throttle body gasket on hand when this is done? :oops:
 

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diff I did not use a new throttle body gasket, mine came out clean when I took off the throttle body so I reused it, so far so good
 

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Discussion Starter #13
ferret said:
the bypass totally remove hose #3, disconnect the throttle body side of hose #4 and connect it to where hose #3 was connected to the engine, now nothing should be connected to the throttle body
This seems like the best way to bypass the throttle body. It would be a solution.
HOWEVER, there seems to be a lot of work involved to get to the spot where hose #3 is attached to the engine, it may be only a little more work to just replace the faulty piece and keep the original functionality. Especially since I have a new #3 hose and would want to replace it if I'm going to be replacing the heater plate. I don't know. Maybe I'll get the heater plate kit to have on hand. Bypass for now and further down the line do a proper job with the replacement. :think:

Of note: I inquired AtlanticBritish.com about a replacement #4 hose and was told the part was no longer made. So extra care should be taken with this hose. It is possible that some dealer has it in stock, but still, good to know... be careful with it. :!:
 

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Discussion Starter #14
diff said:
I think that ours leaks in the same spot and bought the kit on ebay. The way I have read about doing it [if you do] is to remove the throttle body-access should be easy then. Could anyone confirm the requirement to also have a new throttle body gasket on hand when this is done? :oops:
Remove the throttle body! :doh: Of course. That sure would make it much easier. :p

Thank you! :D
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Re: Coolant leak... bad gasket? FIXED!!

I replaced the throttle heater plate! And the throttle body to engine (coolant intake) hose. AND the fan belt. :D

Just a matter of getting in there in an organized way and remove what needs removing and replacing what is bad. Not so hard when it gets watered down to step by step simplicity. One bolt at a time... :wink:





Had to remove big 'thing' to get to the hose... which meant removing belt.. so why not replace belt
since it was showing signs wear... :thumb:










Not bad. Only two hours total.

Thanks to those who responded and shared ideas and wisdom. :clap:
 

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Wow...I have the exact same story...just happend today-same story...I must get the Rover fixed...Any idea what this might cost. I had to drop it off at the dealership( eek!!)-just moved to new area...and my old mechanic is 400 miles away. Im'sure the gasket is $20 and the labor is $2,000.

Is your Rover back on the road.

-Chris-Fresno, CA
 

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It took vsolrac 2 hours, not sure what the dealer would take try local mechanic (print out part of this thread to show what's needed) and stress 2 hrs :)
 

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Thanks for your effort; it gives me courage to try my skills on my 57K mile 2000 Holland and Holland. Mine has the same small leak at the throttle body, so I went for the total 4.6 hose replacement kit at British Atlantic, plus a new thermostat. That damned fitting on the top of the engine was my sticking point, so I have delayed the repair for months and just not driven the car. I am a faithful fluid changer on my car; virtually every fluid has been changed at least three times in its low-mileage life. Oil changes at least once a year with synthetics, even if the car has travelled only a couple of thousand miles...a few years with only a thousand or less. Sometimes, The Queen ought to have "Garage" in front of her title. Still, I may do exactly as you did, especially if it takes just a few hours. Then I could resume the love affair I have had with The Queen and all those special moments when the ride (still EAS, but with new bags and Bilsteins) and the feel/smell of the leather makes me think that this isn't just any SUV.

Thanks :wink:
 

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vsolrac said:
ferret said:
the bypass totally remove hose #3, disconnect the throttle body side of hose #4 and connect it to where hose #3 was connected to the engine, now nothing should be connected to the throttle body
This seems like the best way to bypass the throttle body. It would be a solution.
HOWEVER, there seems to be a lot of work involved to get to the spot where hose #3 is attached to the engine, it may be only a little more work to just replace the faulty piece and keep the original functionality. Especially since I have a new #3 hose and would want to replace it if I'm going to be replacing the heater plate. I don't know. Maybe I'll get the heater plate kit to have on hand. Bypass for now and further down the line do a proper job with the replacement. :think:

Of note: I inquired AtlanticBritish.com about a replacement #4 hose and was told the part was no longer made. So extra care should be taken with this hose. It is possible that some dealer has it in stock, but still, good to know... be careful with it. :!:
i have the exact same problem and plan to replace the belt and hoses at the same time and as well i cant find that hose #4. does anyone know the size of the nipple on the expansion tank and on the throttle body heater? from the pics it looks like its 1/4". will fuel line stand up to anti-freeze? if thats the size i may just run a length of fuel line back to the expansion tank.
 
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