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i just bought an 01 RR with 70,000 miles. this is my first LR and i love it so far. the previous owner has converted the suspension to coils... i dont have a problem with it, but i feel like im missing out on the landrover experience by not having the air suspension. is it worth the investment or trouble to get it converted back? i heard the air is a bit of a pain in the butt
 

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There pros and cons of both air and coils.

If you price up the conversion back to air you may find it's cost prohibitive. Might be better selling yours and buying another p38 with the factory air suspension. Suggest you go and test drive an air suspension Rangie then you've got a basis to make a decision.
 

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It does depend how much of the air system has been ripped out, it could be very easy to convert it back.
 

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rogan said:
There pros and cons of both air and coils.

If you price up the conversion back to air you may find it's cost prohibitive.
Hardly. Most of the time much of the system is left in place so you are only out a couple hundred for new bags. THere are also many folks that sell off their bits for dirt cheap. Contact Scotty as he had a couple of systems in whole available.
 

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rrtoadhall said:
rogan said:
There pros and cons of both air and coils.

If you price up the conversion back to air you may find it's cost prohibitive.
Hardly. Most of the time much of the system is left in place so you are only out a couple hundred for new bags. THere are also many folks that sell off their bits for dirt cheap. Contact Scotty as he had a couple of systems in whole available.
+1, the one i have everything has been left in place including the air lines to the bags, so it really would be just a case of putting new bags in, which probably wouldnt be a bad idea anyway, preventative maintenance wise.
 

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rrtoadhall said:
rogan said:
There pros and cons of both air and coils.

If you price up the conversion back to air you may find it's cost prohibitive.
Hardly. Most of the time much of the system is left in place so you are only out a couple hundred for new bags. THere are also many folks that sell off their bits for dirt cheap. Contact Scotty as he had a couple of systems in whole available.

+2, I always recommend rebuilding the compressor and valve block, do it now while still on coils, so you can do it at your leisure. Then new airsprings, reset the computer and you're good to go. I've helped several with their reversals, it's not hard, especially if everything was left and no wires were cut.
 

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Are you unhappy with your ride? The only experience your missing is more maintenance.
Chances are if it was swapped there was a reason. Cheaper to put in coils than to fix the air.
Save your $ and use it for regular maint.
 

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shupack said:
rrtoadhall said:
rogan said:
There pros and cons of both air and coils.

If you price up the conversion back to air you may find it's cost prohibitive.
Hardly. Most of the time much of the system is left in place so you are only out a couple hundred for new bags. THere are also many folks that sell off their bits for dirt cheap. Contact Scotty as he had a couple of systems in whole available.

+2, I always recommend rebuilding the compressor and valve block, do it now while still on coils, so you can do it at your leisure. Then new airsprings, reset the computer and you're good to go. I've helped several with their reversals, it's not hard, especially if everything was left and no wires were cut.
What I'm trying to say is it may be cheaper to sell and re-buy, so work out the costs first. When you add in parts, labour and time costs then things can become expensive. Fine if you have diy skills and plenty of time, but not if you have both limited time and skills.
 

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I agree with the last post. If you have the time to learn the intricacies of the pneumatic suspension and the time and motivation to work on the truck yourself, then it is a project you can undertake. If you plan to pay someone else to put it back together, then forget it. Way too much money and you won't have the knowledge to fix it if/when it leaks/breaks. There is a ton of info on the air suspension and Dennis (RoverRenovations) has all the rebuild and upgrade parts if you want to convert it back.

First thing, take an inventory of the air suspension parts still in the truck. If you are missing the compressor, valve block and air lines, then forget it. If those parts are still in place, then it may be do-able. Take a look at the parts and give us an inventory...

If you have the parts still in place, then I would recommend rebuilding the compressor, valve block and changing the o-rings in the tank/airbags. The previous owner could have been frustrated with a few trips to the dealer for small leaks or air bag replacements. You may get lucky and the valve block and compressor may be great. But to reduce headaches in the future and have a good starting base, I would recommend rebuilding/replacing those worn parts.

Build a cable and download Storey's EAS software to reset computer and be sure your height sensors are working.

While you're at it, get GenIII airsprings and get some extra height!

Keep us posted....
 

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Sorry for dragging up a VERY old thread but the OP is still kinda around and I'm wondering if this ever worked out?

But also very curious about Dennis and Rover Renovations. I'm planning on putting my new one back on air and will be looking to source valve block parts and fitting O rings and the like.

Rioja.
 

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Neither Dennis nor Rover Renovations is around any more.
 

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There are lots of used valve blocks with compressors on EBay for reasonable prices. Easy to rebuild for not too many dollars.
 

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Thanks for the info guys.
Toad thanks for catching me up on Dennis and Richard_G for the link. That is what I'm looking for. A kit for the complete job.
Gordo51 I've rebuilt the blocks and pump before a few years back on my other Rangie. This new one is sitting on springs.
I've had a quick look and all the major components are there but I have no idea yet what kind of shape they're in. Haven't tested anything yet.

Rioja.
 

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My P38 was on springs when I bought it, and the compressor with the enclosure had been removed.
I found a guy who wanted to put his on coils and we did a swap of the bits.
Once fitted, my air was still unserviceable, but I had suspected that and done the aux fill modification which allowed me to drive it.
A member on here who lives in Cape Town then helped me out by diagnosing a hard fault in the ECU that once cleared, led to normal service being resumed.

All too often, the EAS will throw a hard fault that the average mechanic who is unfamiliar with the car will miss and then it's a downward spiral into lots of money for no improvement until the owner throws his hands up and goes over to coils, when all the while it was a relatively achievable fix.
 

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The pneumatics and faults I don't expect to present any issues I can't work through having maintained the EAS myself on a prior P38. What I don't have any knowledge of is what happens when one gets converted to coils and therefore what to prepare for to convert it back other than the obvious of having the air bladders.

Is it simply a matter of jacking up one corner, (then what is holding the spring in), lowering the corner to the bumpstop and installing the bladder with the spring clip and air pipe?

I suppose I'll just have to get under there and try to have a look (feel).

Rioja.
 

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Kind of. Go to Terrafirma a website and download and read the install instructions for there
HD coil conversion kit install. Basically you will be doing the reverse. A lift helps. Do the FL and RL at once then do the other side. If you fit Schrader valves on those airlines fill the bags and then do the other side. I would use new clips and pins in the front and the rear. Wipe off the surfaces with a clean wet rag. Install the bags and insert pins. The fronts have 10mm bolts that retain the pins. You might need spring compressors to compress the coils to get them out. It’s not too bad of a job.
 

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The pneumatics and faults I don't expect to present any issues I can't work through having maintained the EAS myself on a prior P38. What I don't have any knowledge of is what happens when one gets converted to coils and therefore what to prepare for to convert it back other than the obvious of having the air bladders.

Is it simply a matter of jacking up one corner, (then what is holding the spring in), lowering the corner to the bumpstop and installing the bladder with the spring clip and air pipe?

I suppose I'll just have to get under there and try to have a look (feel).

Rioja.
You need to have a diagnostics tool at hand, when you put an airbag in you need to inflate it before you take the car of the jack. It doesn't need much air in it, but enough that it's not on the bump stops.

With mine I needed to disconnect a little box under the drivers seat, and connect a plug back in the ride height switch.
 

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Kind of. Go to Terrafirma a website and download and read the install instructions for there
HD coil conversion kit install. Basically you will be doing the reverse. A lift helps. Do the FL and RL at once then do the other side. If you fit Schrader valves on those airlines fill the bags and then do the other side. I would use new clips and pins in the front and the rear. Wipe off the surfaces with a clean wet rag. Install the bags and insert pins. The fronts have 10mm bolts that retain the pins. You might need spring compressors to compress the coils to get them out. It’s not too bad of a job.

Nah, if you have a big jack, just disconnect the shocks, and then you can lift the car up high enough and take them out..

Indeed, it's not to bad of a job, went quicker as expected.
 

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You need to have a diagnostics tool at hand, when you put an airbag in you need to inflate it before you take the car of the jack. It doesn't need much air in it, but enough that it's not on the bump stops.

With mine I needed to disconnect a little box under the drivers seat, and connect a plug back in the ride height switch.
With a diagnostics tool I mean; I've got a Nanocom, with this you can turn on the compressor and open the valves individually.. Not sure if this is possible with other diagnostic tools..
 
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