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Discussion Starter #1
Hi All,

I try to do as much work as possible, but some small things I would rather just send my vehicle to have done. One of which being brakes. I was talking to one mechanic who apparently specializes in RRCs, told me to completely to the job the "old school and right way" would be a 7 hour job that with a $1000 tab not including parts.

To me that sounds ludicrous as no other foreign luxury vehicle I've had cost that much. Given, I recently bought my RRC and don't know how well the previous owner took care of the brakes which makes it an unknown.


What needs to be done for a complete brake job? What is the responsible amount of time to do it? What are the costs for labor in the Los Angeles market?


Thanks all!
 

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1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
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Hi All,

I try to do as much work as possible, but some small things I would rather just send my vehicle to have done. One of which being brakes. I was talking to one mechanic who apparently specializes in RRCs, told me to completely to the job the "old school and right way" would be a 7 hour job that with a $1000 tab not including parts.

To me that sounds ludicrous as no other foreign luxury vehicle I've had cost that much. Given, I recently bought my RRC and don't know how well the previous owner took care of the brakes which makes it an unknown.


What needs to be done for a complete brake job? What is the responsible amount of time to do it? What are the costs for labor in the Los Angeles market?


Thanks all!
At this age, it can be a Pandora’s box. It’s going to depend a lot on how well it was maintained, as you may have more than just regular maintenance. Assuming your rotors don’t need to be replaced, 7 hrs seems high.

However, unless you know the maintenance/ repair history, you could be looking at a lot of seal replacements in addition to replacing the rotors. It’s essentially a front axle rebuild. But having leak free swivels is a great thing...

In the rear, you have to deal with the tone rings. These can be a challenge to remove, but mine were relatively pain free.

Then theres the brake lines. These could be a potential time bomb, but once you’ve baselined your brakes and axles, it’s just normal maintenance after that...

I know this because I’ve had to do this, BTW, I’ve owned this rig for over twenty years.


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He’s right. I just had all of this done on my 1991 range rover classic. Ended up rebuilding axles / swivels, replacing brake lines, new rotors, calipers, pads, etc. It took a long time.
 

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1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
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One benefit of rebuilding the axles as part of rotor replacement is I no longer have any fears about attempting this type of repair on the trail


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actually, 7.0 hrs is a great offer for a brake job on classic, the labor if replacing rotors include removing rear floating axles, replacing hub seals, cleaning and packing wheel bearings, adjusting bearing preload, the abs ring on the rears is bolted to the rotor and must be transferred to the new rotor. those bolts are wedged between hub and rotor.

the front is a little different but equally challenging. this does not include fluid flush or caliper replacement, factory used to recommend 14.0 hrs labor for both axles and it does take a day to complete a brake job on a classic.
on land rovers with floating rotors,(p38's d2's and newer)factory called 10.0 hrs to replace pads and rotors on both axles plus parts.
 

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1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
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actually, 7.0 hrs is a great offer for a brake job on classic, the labor if replacing rotors include removing rear floating axles, replacing hub seals, cleaning and packing wheel bearings, adjusting bearing preload, the abs ring on the rears is bolted to the rotor and must be transferred to the new rotor. those bolts are wedged between hub and rotor.

the front is a little different but equally challenging. this does not include fluid flush or caliper replacement, factory used to recommend 14.0 hrs labor for both axles and it does take a day to complete a brake job on a classic.
on land rovers with floating rotors,(p38's d2's and newer)factory called 10.0 hrs to replace pads and rotors on both axles plus parts.
, 95classiclwb replaced my brake lines and was key to getting my rig roadworthy after a 10 slumber. He knows what he’s talking about...


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Discussion Starter #7
actually, 7.0 hrs is a great offer for a brake job on classic, the labor if replacing rotors include removing rear floating axles, replacing hub seals, cleaning and packing wheel bearings, adjusting bearing preload, the abs ring on the rears is bolted to the rotor and must be transferred to the new rotor. those bolts are wedged between hub and rotor.

the front is a little different but equally challenging. this does not include fluid flush or caliper replacement, factory used to recommend 14.0 hrs labor for both axles and it does take a day to complete a brake job on a classic.
on land rovers with floating rotors,(p38's d2's and newer)factory called 10.0 hrs to replace pads and rotors on both axles plus parts.

Thanks for the explanation guys, I'm realizing it wasn't just a usual brake job!
 

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Thanks for the explanation guys, I'm realizing it wasn't just a usual brake job!
you could do just a pad swap in a couple of hrs., but if rotors or calipers are in bad shape pad swap is just a band aid. worse if you have leaking wheel seal(s) as now the heat glazes the oil on the new pad and rotor.
 

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1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
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Thanks for the explanation guys, I'm realizing it wasn't just a usual brake job!
LOL! Welcome to classic LR ownership. After all, they’ve been making mechanics of owners since 1948...


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Having done all new rotors, pads and extended brake lines and a new caliper, I can attest that it is indeed time consuming (took me a full day start to finish), but not a total PITA. If you are the least bit mechanically inclined, have a decent set of tools and access to you tube, it's pretty straight forward and a great way to learn about your truck!
 
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