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Discussion Starter #1
I know it's highly not recommended, but after 2 years of electrical issues, 2 to 3 alternators, 7 to 8 batteries I don't care anymore - are there any high output alternators (200 amps or higher) that are compatible or requires little to some modification to get to fit in a 2010 supercharged model?
 

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https://www.qualitypowerauto.com/catalog.php?item=379

You can't use amps unless the vehicle has a need for them. These things should power a set of aircraft landing lights for those offroad excursions thru the school soccer field parking lots.
Thanks! Yup, I understand how amps works - I suspect the OEM and equivalent same spec alternators are choking on a erroneous or unanticipated current draw or simply doesn't perform well once it nears it's threshold amperage. Maybe the voltage drops which starts zapping electrical components. I'm hoping with more than twice the amperage capabilities voltage sag won't be a problem.
 

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2006-2009 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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My old Cadillac STS's used to do something similar to this, but their alternators were right infront of and below the oil fill cap on the 4.6L engines, everyone always spilled a little oil doing oil changes and it dripped right into the rear of the alternators turning the brushes to mush. They would start turning on the battery light every cold start, only to go away after a few minutes and if you let it go long enough at random times during a drive cycle. New brushes were the solution in that case.
 

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It sounds to me that there is something wrong with your car rather than the alternators or batteries. Have you checked to see if there is excessive draw on the battery when the vehicle is shut off? Continuously draining a battery to the point where it is almost dead and then recharging it is not good for a battery or alternator.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
It sounds to me that there is something wrong with your car rather than the alternators or batteries. Have you checked to see if there is excessive draw on the battery when the vehicle is shut off? Continuously draining a battery to the point where it is almost dead and then recharging it is not good for a battery or alternator.
Yes, I have a parasitic draw, but even when the battery, alternator and the actual component causing the parasitic draw are all replaced at the same time, one of the electrical error lights come back on within 72 hours (charging system fault, cruise control not available, gearbox fault, etc.). This has happened several times. The component causing the parasitic draw is different each time. I think the draw is a symptom of an undiscovered electrical issue where it's zapping random components causing them to stay on too long or draw more than they're spec'd for. I figured I start at the heart of the system with the alternator, but not use the OEM spec'd model they keep putting in (the dealership techs).
 

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What I suspect here is one of QUALITY of voltage delivered rather than current available. If the voltage supplied contains, for example, too much ripple, the solid state components in the system will fail. The same result could result from defective filter caps, allowing excessive noise somewhere, spiking the components. I doubt that a higher current alternator will be the answer, unless to ones you are getting cannot supply the rated current, such as a defective diode. You might need an oscilloscope here, but a DVM might help. Check the voltage across the battery, using the AC voltage setting. This might expose an AC ripple component, or noise. Ray
 

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https://www.qualitypowerauto.com/catalog.php?item=379

You can't use amps unless the vehicle has a need for them. These things should power a set of aircraft landing lights for those offroad excursions thru the school soccer field parking lots.
LMAO! yea trust those folks look at errors in their coverage " 2003-2009 4.4 engine water cooled" 2008-2009 4.4 engine non-watercooled.

Now I have to say I am pretty worn out after these last 10 days, as far as the the BMW L322 2001 in the UK, 2002 for NAS only lasted until 2005 with the water- cooled alternators

2006 range brought out the wicked step child cross between Ford's new platform and outdated BMW entertainment and some operational bits.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
What I suspect here is one of QUALITY of voltage delivered rather than current available. If the voltage supplied contains, for example, too much ripple, the solid state components in the system will fail. The same result could result from defective filter caps, allowing excessive noise somewhere, spiking the components. I doubt that a higher current alternator will be the answer, unless to ones you are getting cannot supply the rated current, such as a defective diode. You might need an oscilloscope here, but a DVM might help. Check the voltage across the battery, using the AC voltage setting. This might expose an AC ripple component, or noise. Ray
I was just thinking that. Where exactly do I connect the leads of my digital voltage meter to test for noise and AC ripple?
 

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Discussion Starter #10
What I suspect here is one of QUALITY of voltage delivered rather than current available. If the voltage supplied contains, for example, too much ripple, the solid state components in the system will fail. The same result could result from defective filter caps, allowing excessive noise somewhere, spiking the components. I doubt that a higher current alternator will be the answer, unless to ones you are getting cannot supply the rated current, such as a defective diode. You might need an oscilloscope here, but a DVM might help. Check the voltage across the battery, using the AC voltage setting. This might expose an AC ripple component, or noise. Ray
I was just thinking that. Where exactly do I connect the leads of my digital voltage meter to test for noise and AC ripple?
Okay, I figured out how to do a AC ripple test. Can there be dirty or noisy DC voltage that can cause issues too or is it just AC voltage that does that?
 

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Loose connections can cause noise on the voltage, but that will likely be more random in nature. Things like defective filter capacitors can cause noise on the DC. Can you describe what you are seeing? Ray
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Loose connections can cause noise on the voltage, but that will likely be more random in nature. Things like defective filter capacitors can cause noise on the DC. Can you describe what you are seeing? Ray
Seeing, in terms of?
 
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