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2006-2009 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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2006 HSE (NAS)

I see all kinds of references to this failing and adding a switch but I’ve yet to unearth any actual directions. Can somebody point me to a tutorial or at least the parts? I’m probably overthinking it but what do I do at the fuse box? I can’t just add a fuse tap can I because that still uses the same fuse? I need to break the connection there in order to add the switch do I not? (And an in-line fuse)
And where is everyone mounting this switch? I’ve seen them in the change holder but would rather not put mine there.
 

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2002-2005 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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You are overthinking. The Fuse 18 technique is basically pull Fuse 18 and then reinsert. This of course is a pain - so the workaround is to use a switch so that the fuse doesn't need to be repeatedly pulled out. Flick the switch - which is the same as pulling the fuse. BUT YOU SHOULD STILL HAVE A FUSE. You could try taking a blown fuse, the ones with the ends that have exposed embedded terminals and solder wires to both sides. The fuse has to be blown - open circuit. You are just using this to plug in to fuse box so it doesn't have to be pretty, but it has to remain in a condition you can plug it in to the fuse box. From there, one wire will go to the a new fuse carrier, the other wire of the fuse carrier will go to one end of a switch, and finally the other end of the switch will go to the modified blown fuse. Clean it up so you have no shorts with shrink tubing and pick your wire length to carry the current and allow you to place it where you want. I would imagine someone makes a straight plug in, but I have never looked.

If you are having problems with your steering lock, and you have determined it is the column lock issue - you should just fix what is most likely the broken magnet in the solenoid. Either the solenoids is sticking or the magnet is cracked or both. There are numerous write ups on this forum about the process. I have never done it, but it doesn't appear too complicated. You need to remove the steering column casing, air bag and steering wheel and then remove the ECU case. From there it is open case, not difficult but not bad, by drilling out some pins that hold it together. Remove solenoid and replace the magnet and lubricate. The magnet that people use is an R422 and can be purchased for less than $1.00 (postage extra).

It could be a sticking solenoid where people have drilled holes and sprayed a solvent cleaner at in to get it working. Me, if you are going this far, may as well pull it out and have a look and fix the magnet if it is cracked. A little extra work, but risk of damage is minimal and the results will be better.
 

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You are overthinking. The Fuse 18 technique is basically pull Fuse 18 and then reinsert. This of course is a pain - so the workaround is to use a switch so that the fuse doesn't need to be repeatedly pulled out. Flick the switch - which is the same as pulling the fuse. BUT YOU SHOULD STILL HAVE A FUSE. You could try taking a blown fuse, the ones with the ends that have exposed embedded terminals and solder wires to both sides. The fuse has to be blown - open circuit. You are just using this to plug in to fuse box so it doesn't have to be pretty, but it has to remain in a condition you can plug it in to the fuse box. From there, one wire will go to the a new fuse carrier, the other wire of the fuse carrier will go to one end of a switch, and finally the other end of the switch will go to the modified blown fuse. Clean it up so you have no shorts with shrink tubing and pick your wire length to carry the current and allow you to place it where you want. I would imagine someone makes a straight plug in, but I have never looked.

If you are having problems with your steering lock, and you have determined it is the column lock issue - you should just fix what is most likely the broken magnet in the solenoid. Either the solenoids is sticking or the magnet is cracked or both. There are numerous write ups on this forum about the process. I have never done it, but it doesn't appear too complicated. You need to remove the steering column casing, air bag and steering wheel and then remove the ECU case. From there it is open case, not difficult but not bad, by drilling out some pins that hold it together. Remove solenoid and replace the magnet and lubricate. The magnet that people use is an R422 and can be purchased for less than $1.00 (postage extra).

It could be a sticking solenoid where people have drilled holes and sprayed a solvent cleaner at in to get it working. Me, if you are going this far, may as well pull it out and have a look and fix the magnet if it is cracked. A little extra work, but risk of damage is minimal and the results will be better.
Is there a way to wire fuse 18 to say a lighting fuse so that circuit is broken then turned on when lights go on and off in car? That way no switch needed.
 

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Registered
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2006 HSE (NAS)

I see all kinds of references to this failing and adding a switch but I’ve yet to unearth any actual directions. Can somebody point me to a tutorial or at least the parts? I’m probably overthinking it but what do I do at the fuse box? I can’t just add a fuse tap can I because that still uses the same fuse? I need to break the connection there in order to add the switch do I not? (And an in-line fuse)
And where is everyone mounting this switch? I’ve seen them in the change holder but would rather not put mine there.
lock fix


This is the simplest video I found to show the quick switch fix.
I took the basic idea and put a rocker valet switch on my lower console. It has worked like a dream for 3 years.
288096
 
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