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Discussion Starter #1
I decided that I do not have the time to keep replacing parts on the EAS and decided to do the coil spring conversion upgrade. No more leaks :clap: :thumb: :dance: I will post pictures of ride height for future reference for others with old Rovers that want to upgrade to coil springs.

I drove in a friends Range Rover that had the coil spring upgrade and honestly I could not tell the difference.
 

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You have probably already guessed that this forum is pro keeping EAS. So let me be the first to say that this is not an "upgrade" but a conversion.
 

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It is your vehicle, so do whatever you would like. I just got back into RR and I looked at several vehicles which only one still had EAS. I ended up getting that one mainly for the novelty (and the fact it was rare to find one still with the air suspension). I also like working on my vehicles and try to do all the work myself.

At the end of the day, decide what is best for you.
 

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rogan,

I'm not very vocal, but I am pro EAS.
Great off road clearance, great highway cruising, easy for my lady to get in and out, etc, etc, and etc.

Simple DIY maintenance has kept my EAS working reliably for 10 years now with only minor problems.
Never once has it let me down, to coin a phrase.
Admittedly I have recently replaced the bags as a preventative move and put in a piston and seal kit in the compressor for similar reasons. Shupack's O ring kit for a few dollars, has also sealed up the whole show like new again.

Cheap in comparison to a spring conversion and the car is still original.
Also, how the spring conversion affects your insurance is anybody's guess.

I'm right behind you NorCal :thumb:

Cheers,
Keijo
 

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In New Zealand coils are legal and don't affect insurance. And yes I've checked this out for myself.

I couldn't care less if anyone stays on eas or converts to coils. It's their car and they can do what they want. I do find some humour in those who constantly bang on praising EAS and belittling coils seemingly to justify the amount of time/money they've spent on their eas. Fine of you're a diy'er, but what about those people who have to pay for work to be done on the vehicle.

I'm not anti EAS, but I am pro informed decision making.
 

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rogan,

If you base your "informed decision making" on what you read in this forum, you are getting a very biased perspective.
The people that post here are the ones who have problems. The vast majority who have no issues are not heard from.

Like you I don't care what others do, but I do care that when I simply state an opinion in favour of EAS, you somehow find that humorous and accuse me and others of "banging on" and "belittling coils"

What sort of a reasoned reply is that?
 

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Good luck to you I say !
Certainly try and post pictures of the conversion, but I think the board filters have been set to dissable violent pornography. :)
 

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BTW folks,

Has anyone tried the true upgrade path i.e coils w/air springs? So you get the best of both worlds. Say a couple of months back, i remember seeing
a system which had air springs inside the coils. But i can't remember where i found that page.
 

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Hi,

Well don´t forget it will depend on the country too.. The restrictions in the MOT (or IPO has is called here) is a big problem with the conversion to coil so you see very few converted around here..

Regards,
 

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rogan said:
I do find some humour in those who constantly bang on praising EAS and belittling coils seemingly to justify the amount of time/money they've spent on their eas
I wasn't belittling coils, most vehicles still have them. But the Range was a very early attempt at an adaptive suspension that could be user adjusted for the conditions. Now there are air systems on Mercedes, Porsche, VW, Audi, and more. Sports cars use magnetic shock fluid to change damping for more agressive damping. I will admit that Rovers execution of a great idea was flawed with the greatest flaw being not properly training their own dealers on the system and making major components modular. But I like many, have been willing to learn the system, DIY some basic repairs, and learn how to deal with a failure (via Rover Rennovations and RSW). The only reason to go through this is for something you want to keep. I don't see how a coil conversion could be viewed as anything but a downgrade given that it removes height adjustment capabilities. But a downgrade for the sake of ultimate reliability is sometimes worth it. Just not for me.
 

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Keijo said:
If you base your "informed decision making" on what you read in this forum, you are getting a very biased perspective.
My point exactly. There is a very vocal eas lobby group and no real balance in the discussion

Keijo said:
but I do care that when I simply state an opinion in favour of EAS, you somehow find that humorous and accuse me and others of "banging on" and "belittling coils"...What sort of a reasoned reply is that?
Am I not allowed a sense of humour? Here's some seasoned replies:
viewtopic.php?f=3&t=35872

NorCall RR said:
I don't see how a coil conversion could be viewed as anything but a downgrade given that it removes height adjustment capabilities. But a downgrade for the sake of ultimate reliability is sometimes worth it. Just not for me.
Well put. To me the reliability increase is an upgrade. I don't have the time or desire to tinker with my suspension.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
What I meant by upgrade was the reliability factor. I did not enjoy spending 50+ minutes manually pumping each air spring with a compressor. Then going around each corner to make sure I had the correct ride height and letting air in and out to level the car just so I can get going to work.

To be able to just turn on the truck in the morning and just drive is a HUGE luxury in the P38 lately. So for me the worry free start up when I need to use the truck is an enormous upgrade.

Now I can let others borrow my truck without having to worry that they will be stranded with a leak.

As nice as the height adjustability it is also it's biggest Achille's heel. Nice when new but a headache with age.
 

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rogan,

No problem at all with you choosing coils over the EAS.
The only problem I had was with you attacking those who choose to retain the EAS.

If you want a balanced discussion, and are pro informed decision making, then argue the case, but dont scoff at those who hold an opinion different to your own.

Now getting back to the point.
I can only give you my own experiences.
I don't "tinker" with my suspension, I've never had to.
I have spent far less money than what a coil conversion is worth, on a bit of preventative maintenance and have had no problems as a consequence.
Sure I did it myself as the work was simple, but being simple I guess it woulkd also be simple and relatively cheap for a mechanic to do..

So for me, and I emphasize "for me", there is no reason at all to consider even for a moment to let go all the good things I see in the EAS and spend all that money to put in coils, just because of the problems some others have had with their cars.

Having said all that Rogan,
If you are concerned about the reliability of the EAS system based on your own experiences and on what you have heard here, and if changing to coils will give you peace of mind, then it's worth doing, and I don't see anything wrong with that at all.

Good luck with the job

Cheers,
Keijo
 

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I know what you mean by saying that it's a luxury just to be able to drive in the morning, when the EAS is acting up. I went through the same kind of thing month or two ago, whereas my compressor would intermittently stop due to faulty motor brush, causing EAS hard fault all the time. However, now I've made peace w/ my EAS, and am happy to have it. If I didn't have other cars to fall back on, I may have done the same thing as you.

Caveat w/ coil conversion (comments said by somebody who recently converted to coils on MkIII), is that ride height usually gets messed up, usually on the high side, and the ride will be noticeably rougher. May not be an issue w/ P38s, since it's value is already depreciated so much, but with MkIIIs, with coil conversion trade-in value apparently drops if the dealership finds that it's converted.

Either way, good luck.
 

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I didn't decide between coils and eas. The coils were already on when I bought it; coil vs eas wasn't a factor in the purchase decision.

I can see the benefits of both systems. Coils are better for my purpose and are completely legal and insurable where I live. To decry coils as a backward step, downgrade, castration etc etc is in my mind somewhat ridiculous. It's like having a debate over whether to put strawberry or raspberry jam on a piece of toast.
 

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medcapequip said:
As nice as the height adjustability it is also it's biggest Achille's heel. Nice when new but a headache with age.
In my case, just the opposite. When I bought my first P38 in 1997, I didn't know know anything about the system. But it was obvious the dealer didn't either so I better learn to understand it or fork out big bills to LR whenever there was a problem. These days all the spares are available cheap along with emergency bypass and easy to use reset tools. When I bought my second P38, it had an intermittent problem easily traced to the driver block. Fixed it, installed MARS, purchased a Buddy Box. Not a problem in the last 45K miles plus I'm not worried there will be. Something breaks, I'll fix it cheap. There is nothing expensive on the system. And to me its one of those things that makes a Range Rover and Range Rover. If I wanted a Yukon, I would buy one.
 

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TheoR said:
I know what you mean by saying that it's a luxury just to be able to drive in the morning, when the EAS is acting up. I went through the same kind of thing month or two ago, whereas my compressor would intermittently stop due to faulty motor brush, causing EAS hard fault all the time. However, now I've made peace w/ my EAS, and am happy to have it. If I didn't have other cars to fall back on, I may have done the same thing as you.

Caveat w/ coil conversion (comments said by somebody who recently converted to coils on MkIII), is that ride height usually gets messed up, usually on the high side, and the ride will be noticeably rougher. May not be an issue w/ P38s, since it's value is already depreciated so much, but with MkIIIs, with coil conversion trade-in value apparently drops if the dealership finds that it's converted.

Either way, good luck.

I purchased my 96 with the coil conversion already done - has the AB Bilstein kit. Ride height is just about right for an SUV of this size, and the truck rides smooth. I've driven EAS P38's and I don't think there is much of a difference. Handling is just fine.

I've stated before that if I had a working EAS that I would try my best to keep it, and someday I might try to switch back, as it looks like all I need are the bags. However, with 4 vehicles to maintain myself, right now I can appreciate the value of "less is more"......I would not call coils and upgrade or downgrade either, more of a modification.

From my perspective I can see why sometimes those with coils feel like they have to be defensive based on some of the statements made. Again, just my perspective and not meaning to point out anybody or anything. To each his own.
 

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coils or not these vehicles are a huge step up from anything out there! My better half has a '08 Honda Element, (I) paid about 30k for it while my rangie cost 10k, even with a diff repair and coils it is still cheaper, no bank loan, and much higher class of vehicle both inside and out...though I could get an '08 Mazda 3 for 10k.... :naughty:
No, a Rangie, even with its "issues" is still much better: ride, comfort, safety, field of vision, AWD, high and low, winter (real winter) driving, space, even pretty easy to fix most of its common problems, heck we all know that about these rigs; would only consider getting another vehicle if it was going to be a Mk III.

cheers

george
 
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