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Discussion Starter #1
Hi there,

Hope everyone's well. First time using this forum so please be kind! :)

I was wondering if somebody could give me some advice regarding a clear coat peeling issue.

We have an L322 (2006) 35th Anniversary Range Rover on which the clear coat has started peeling significantly on the front car bonnet hood and the rear break light spoiler (both easily removable parts should a repair be necessary) as well as some small areas on the roof.

The vehicle still has the original paint job and has never needed to be resprayed/touched up. Is something like this to be expected? We've never had any such issue on other (often older) vehicles.

Land Rover are saying it's nothing to do with them anymore whereas on certain online forums I have read that this is an issue with a poorly completed initial pain job. Land Rover told me to see their authorised body shop privately, who naturally have quoted me to respray the whole vehicle at an inflated price.

Any help would be greatly appreciated!
 

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The paint was simply not taken proper care of. Whether always in the sun, never waxed, never washed, or a combination.

Have the portion where the clear is pealed repainted. If the roof is damaged, have that painted. If the hood is damaged, have that painted as well. Any good body shop should be able to match the paint 100%.


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2006-2009 Range Rover Sport
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I have an 06 L320 Charcoal Gray that started peeling about a year ago. Washed regularly and fully detailed twice a year. I also have a black 2002 Tundra, always outside and rarely waxed, with no issues. I have a friend that paints beautiful classic cars (16k paint jobs) who says it's bad/cheap or misapplied clear-coat. I also think it's a factory problem, but not much we can do now. I'm getting my hood, roof, rear, and some minor ding repair done for $2100 which includes reconditioning and clear-coating my headlights. Hope that helps.
 

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Climate can easily cancel any detailing efforts. Since it is your horizontal surfaces it could be as simple as a summer rain when the sheet metal was piping hot, or washing the car in direct sun, same impact of shrinking sheet metal and paint can keep up. the paint warranty is only good for the original warranty period and the panel rust through for L322s I believe was 10 years. There were more than a few folks that had paint bubbles at the bottom of their hatches from condensation on the inside running down and collecting in the dust inside the tailgate.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks everyone.

Annoying that it happens on any vehicle let alone those that you would think are 'better' than most.

Much appreciated!
 

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There is nothing special or "better" about Land Rover paint. Mass production painting is pretty much the same across most makes.
 

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From some other board:
"Tom, I worked for PPG (Resins and Coatings Division, Automotive OEM and Refinish) for 16 years, starting out as a chemist and ending up in sales. That said, I'll tell you a few of the causes for the problems you showed us.

Number one: Extreme temperature variations cause delamination between the clearcoat and the basecoat color. This will also rarely happen between the basecoat color and the substrate primer. Basically the clearcoat will expand and contract at a different rate than the basecoat color in extreme heat or cold. It actually happens more often on areas of the car where snow, ice, or frost accumulate. It can also be accelerated in areas that are subsequently heated quickly, such as a hood over the engine.

Number two: Acid Rain, as previously mentioned penetrates the clearcoat surface and breaks down the chemical bond between the clearcoat and the basecoat color. Again, this will cause a delamination between the layers since once the chemical bond is destroyed, only the weaker mechanical bond remains. Like the above reason, usually occurs predominately on top surfaces for obvious reasons.

Number three: More likely on repaints...recoat sensitivity, or not enough dry time either between the basecoat color coats and the clearcoat or not enough flash time between coats of clear. Again, unlikely on OEM and will usually show up much sooner in the form of "solvent popping".

Number four: Poor compatibility between the clearcoat and the basecoat color. I would think Dodge would know better than to do this but I've seen it on OEM before. You can't just put any clear over any substrate. In the old days when I first started, guys used to try to put acrylics over laquer (
). The acrylics were usually much "hotter" and would dissolve the laquer under them. It can be done but usually with an intermediary barrier coat.

Number five: Insufficient clearcoat applied (or even some has been removed by color sanding or buffing) causing the clearcoat to provide a poor UV and chemical barrier. In the late 80s and early 90s the Big 3 were big offenders of this one. They were only allowed to spray a certain quantity of VOCs so rather than paint less cars, they just used less clearcoat on the same number of cars. We all remember the cars and especially trucks running around with paint peeling off back then. Well, there wasn't enough clearcoat or even colorcoat UV and chemical barrier protection to keep the primers from degrading so both the chemical and mechanical bonds were destroyed under the topcoats. It's like leaving something primered and never painting it. After a while the primer looks like chalk. This is another unlikely scenario based on the pictures you posted.

Number six: Poor waterbourne technology. Again, based on the VOC regulations of the time, auto manufacturers used a significant amount of waterbourne materials. Unfortunately, the technology was not very advanced at the time and the protection provided by these materials was substandard at best. Just about anything would penetrate these clearcoats, including water if left to absorb long enough (e.g. snow pack on the roof or hood). This scenario is also likely, based on the period your car was built.

There are a few other possible causes as well, but I could go on forever and a couple of these are most likely.

The bottom line is, the only fix is to sand it down (no chemical stripping) or media blast it off and repaint.

Good luck, hope this helps."
https://meguiarsonline.com/forums/showthread.php?29024-Examples-of-clearcoat-failure-and-an-explanation-of-possible-causes


 

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I had the same issues with my 2006. Roof, door handles, hood,and rear spoiler clear coat fading/peeling. I purchased about 4-5 cans of base coat paint from www.touchupdirect.com. I have no affiliation with them, but amazing base coat. Don't buy their clear coat... its garbage. Buy SprayMax 2k clear coat. Stuff is super dangerous, so get a good mask. If your worried about their 2k clear coat, they do make a 1k, just harder to find and looks just as amazing with results. I tried so many different brands of clear and honestly this one and Krylon clear coat (found at Pep Boys) is the only stuff that comes out perfect. If your going the Krylon route, buy 2 cans for every one can of base coat.

Don't forget to prep.
 

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2010-2012 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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I'm not sure where the original owner was posting from (no location in profile), but did the 35th anniversary edition make it over to the U.S.? Or was it an euro version only?
 
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