RangeRovers.net Forum banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys this is my Range Rover and I was wondering if I could have some help with modification ideas. I am wanting to add a roof rack to it but I am not sure where to find one. I have seen a few on like rovers north and Atlantic British and a few other sites but I was wondering if anyone had one to suggest. And I was also thinking about putting a little bigger and wider tires on it and was wondering if anyone had any advice on that. But also I am just wondering what else to do to my rrc just to take care of it like if anything should be replaced but thank you for any help!
 

·
Registered
1995-2002 Range Rover Classic
Joined
·
1,413 Posts
the sky is the limit followed by how deep is your pocket, the baseline is what do you want to accomplish and do with the truck? will it be off roader or just a dress up. if al all possible join a local fwd club, learn to use your vehicle. all the gear in the world is useless with out a well trained driver.

from personal experience, I would off road completely stock just to see the capabilities of the truck. you can install 245/75/16 with a modest 2 inch lift on your factory wheels. this small lift still retains the majority of axle articulation which is part of the off road magic of a land rover, any taller lift and you're beginning to dwell into heavy and expensive suspension mods with little gains.

the second most important is recovery, install a winch and secure recovery points. furthermore familiarize your self on proper recovery and with technics.

depending on your level of trail and off road, you may think of cladding, protection of truck's body, under ride skid plates, fuel tank protection, sill guard protection AKA side or rock sliders.

once your off road needs deepen you may look into traction devices such as axle lockers, personally I prefer selectable air lockers this may require upgrade of axle shafts. lots of info on these subjects.

roof racks fitting a classic are becoming rare thus difficult and expensive to procure .

in order to take care of your newly acquired vehicle, I would start as I do with any used vehicle I purchase. complete tune up, replace all fluids, thermostat, perform a complete service, replace all belts and hoses, wiper blades and brakes.
inspect and evaluate everything and make and follow a complete service and maintenance plan.
that way, you start with a fresh truck and a new maintenance/repair schedule to which you can adhere long term care and happy ownership.

as to what needs replaced besides what I mentioned above, I would suggest visiting a thrust worthy land rover repair facility and ask them to inspect the vehicle.

best of luck.
 

·
Premium Member
1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
Joined
·
1,482 Posts
^^^x2. Definitely baseline your rig first, as it is new to you. Unless the PO had documentation as to how it had been maintained, you need to baseline. OC, if you're not planning on keeping it very long, then it may not matter.

Regarding roofracks, as 95classiclwb asked, what do you want to do? I've had my '95 RRC for over 18 years and when I first bought it, I outfitted it with a Yakima roof rack system with basket, ski mounts, and bike mounts racks. This served me well for years, even on a cross country trip to Canyonlands and Moab.

A few years ago, I replaced the Yakima with an ARB expedition roof rack with steel mesh floor. This is much bigger and can carry much more load. It's even a good observation platform on which I can stand or sit in a chair. The drawback is that it's more effort to remove than the Yakima was. Both the Yakima and ARB also limited the garages that I can use for parking, but the RRC isn't exactly my city car either.

As previously mentioned, roof racks wont be very cheap, unless you buy used, but then plan on doing some rehab work, i.e., rust abatement, repowdering, etc. You can still get racks for RRCs from ARB, Frontrunner, Voyager, Brownchurch, etc. Of course, there's also Yakima and Thule. It really depends on what you want to do and how much you want to spend...

Yakima roof rack with stock Michelin Lats 205s, EAS on high setting
canyonlands.jpg

ARB roof rack with Cooper Discoverer ST/Maxx 245s EAS replaced by OME coils giving 2" lift, essentially same height as EAS high setting.
fullsizeoutput_3b3.jpg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
thank you so much! Great information! And for me I am going to be doing some I would say intermediate offloading and for me because of where I live it will be a lot of mudding and forest trails. But I will definetly go and get the car serviced because the care didn't come with like any paperwork so I don't know much of what has been done with it. But the suspension has been replaced with old man emu nitrocharger springs and shocks that give the truck a two inch lift but I think they are pretty old because they are quite rusted and I think the springs have begun the sag a little. But besides that I think will continue to look for a rack and find a winch to the number of the truck. But thank you for all the insight!
 

·
Registered
1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
Joined
·
132 Posts
I just want to compliment 95classiclwb and PL626 on their excellent advice. I have been owning and driving Range Rovers on and off road since the mid 1970s and agree completely with the advice given.

Another couple of points to consider though: Don't go too crazy on tire width. In the sort of driving you propose, very wide tires are more of a liability than an asset because they have a tendency to float rather than dig their way through the surface for grip. I have run Bridgestone, Pirellis. Coopers and Kembas over the years but my personal preference is BFG AT KO2 if you can get them in the size you need. They are excellent on all surfaces, including wet and I have never had a single problem with that brand.

Hope this helps

Alan
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Thank you very much! Yea I read that about the tire width somewhere else too good to know and the Range Rover classic in the first place wasn't designed to operate with wide tires. But thank you for the advice and I will definetly check out the BFG AT KO2's
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Thank you very much! Yea I read that about the tire width somewhere else too good to know and the Range Rover classic in the first place wasn't designed to operate with wide tires. But thank you for the advice and I will definetly check out the BFG AT KO2's
 

Attachments

·
Registered
1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
Joined
·
132 Posts
Michellin purchased B F Goodrich a few years ago and typical of the Frogs, could not leave well alone, so they softened the compound and therefore did nothing except make them wear out faster. However, the KO2 version launched in late 2016 was a significant upgrade, mainly in the way the tread wraps around the side wall giving far improved protection. I have had them on my RR for about 5000 Km and find them excellent in all conditions.

It may be worth noting that I live in the Australian bush, about 75 Km from the nearest town and each way to and from town I have to traverse at least 30 Km of really poor "gravel" roads that are invariably rutted, full of pot holes and thick with mud and snow for part of the year (yes it snows in the high country here)

Good luck with whatever you decide

Alan
PS - put a an LED light bar onto the bullbar - you will not believe the difference when driving off-road
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top