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Started the 4.4l US 04 range up an hour ago, and it sounded like it had a tweaked valve or jacked piston...

So I pop the hood to examine where the noise is coming from, put my hands on the valve covers, revved a few times, engine feels smooth, then I notice the fan is wobbling... Shut the range off and there is serious play in the water pump so that's probably where the noise is originating. If you put force on the fan, rust colored coolant pours out from the snout of the water pump, bearings must be shot.

Anyone done this? Easy repair aside from removing the fan?

I found the water pump for under $50 at autozone, roverparts wants triple that, and the dealer wants $450 for it.

I find anything off brand you get at autozone for land rovers actually turns out to be superior to the original part. 1/2 1/4 the price for the most part and all way better in my opinion. They have
 

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Remember that the thread on the fan's viscous coupling is a reverse thread and will be stupidly tight. I made a metal bracket that bolted to the waterpump pulley (using the original small pulley bolts) and then bolted to one of the metal pipe securing 'p' clips to stop the pulley from turning while hanging off the end of the huge spanner.

I've explained that really poorly, but basically you need to stop the water pump pulley from turning to enable you to undo the fan. A wedged screwdriver etc probaly won't be enough.
 

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GKP said:
Remember that the thread on the fan's viscous coupling is a reverse thread and will be stupidly tight. I made a metal bracket that bolted to the waterpump pulley (using the original small pulley bolts) and then bolted to one of the metal pipe securing 'p' clips to stop the pulley from turning while hanging off the end of the huge spanner.

I've explained that really poorly, but basically you need to stop the water pump pulley from turning to enable you to undo the fan. A wedged screwdriver etc probaly won't be enough.

Yeah I did belts last week and made a giant tool out of 1/8th" steel bar 3 feet long with a couple of 1/2" holes drilled in...
 

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Good thing you caught it before it ate your belt & left you on the side of the road, Brad. You'd think that such a well-built vehicle would have better bearings in the water pump.
I'd go for the AutoZone part myself. I've looked at a failed Land Rover original water pump, and compared to some domestic run-of-the-mill pumps I've seen (GM & Ford), it looked pretty flimsy as far as bearings. When these pumps go, they really go.
I'd think that for the legendary quality of Land Rover, they'd use Timken bearings and a strong design.
Good luck, I hope it goes easily.

Incidently, the indepedent service guy I use for some things warned me once that when you replace the belts, if the tension is not properly set and puts too much force on the water pump, that it can cause bearing failure. I don't know how true this is. With domestic vehicles, the tensioner pulley usually controls the pressure. Maybe it's different on Rovers?
 
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03rangiemark said:
Incidently, the indepedent service guy I use for some things warned me once that when you replace the belts, if the tension is not properly set and puts too much force on the water pump, that it can cause bearing failure. I don't know how true this is. With domestic vehicles, the tensioner pulley usually controls the pressure. Maybe it's different on Rovers?
This is as true with the RR as with any vehicle. Too much tension can't always be compensated by the tensioner and will stress the bearings to the point of failure.
 

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Mr. Range Rover said:
This is as true with the RR as with any vehicle. Too much tension can't always be compensated by the tensioner and will stress the bearings to the point of failure.
I'm sorry- I didn't explain:
Most all domestic U.S. (and probably Japanese & Korean) vehicles of the last couple decades remove the chance for error by utilizing an ancillary belt design that has no adjustments, but the specified belt size & tensioner presets to control proper belt tension. For a tensioner to put too much tension on the belt, it would have to have a higher spring tension or hydraulic pressure than designed. Not too likely for a spring to get stronger as it ages, same goes for hydraulic tensioner.

The tensioner design of the (03-05 anyway) Range Rover leaves room for adjustment when mounting the belt tensioners (one for each belt).

Incidentally, the RAVE manual that I have gives no tension spec when reinstalling the ancillary belts (section 86.10.06), but to rotate the tensioner fully anti-clockwise and tighten.
No tension referred to.
 
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