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1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
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Discussion Starter #1
Hey everyone,

Newb here. Wanted to know if it's possible to get the original carburetors for a 1976 Range Rover with the 3.5 V8 engine.

I've looked all over the place (johncraddok, rimmerbros, paddockspares, etc) and it seems nobody has them.

I'm about to embark on a restoration project (I'm purchasing the car tomorrow), and this is one of my main areas of concern.

Any help is greatly appreciated.

Thx
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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Rebild is the best answer, but for new carbs in the Uk there are companies like Rimmer bros, and Southern carbs who can probably help you, both have very good web sites. Or if you have no carbs I think that they were fitted with Stromberg cd175, there are usually a few on Ebay if not specifically for Range Rover they were a common carb on a lot of British cars, like Jaguar, P6 and Sd1 Rover (they also used the better SU carb HIF6 I think), so they are around or try some of the car breakers. If you get the right carb but for another model, say off of a Jaguar you can easily rebuild and rejet for your RRClassic, there isn't much to these carbs very easy to work on:thumb:
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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Just re read your OP and see you have tried Rimmer, was this for SU or Stromberg, Also it depends where the car is from, As the NA spec cars probably had some emission gubbins added to them, would that still be relevant today on a classic car???
 

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1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
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Discussion Starter #8
The previous owner did a conversion to a single carb, so yes the originals are missing.
 

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1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
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Discussion Starter #9
Thank you VERY much for the info!!

I will contact all of those places you mentioned.

You will be hearing from me quite a lot in the coming months as the restoration progresses. :thumb:
 

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1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
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Discussion Starter #10
The car will be coming to the US once it is restored. It is currently in South America.

Do you know which carbs were the original ones for the MY76? SU or Strombergs? Which ones are better?

Thx!
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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I have a feeling I read somewhere that UK cars had SU carbs but other markets had Strombergs but that may be wrong. I know there is some reason why a car could have been fitted with either.
 

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The carbs are both similar in performance, The SU slightly better for a higher performance engine. Triumph cars wanted to design their own carb in the early '60's due to the high cost of the SU carb, but they had to get around the patents that Su had on its carb since the early 1900's. They came up with a Constant Depression carb (CD part of the Stromberg carb.), but then there was a big mix up of BMC and other companies getting involved to end up as BL. So Triumph ended up being able to obtain SU carbs, as it was now a sister company under the BL umbrella, much cheaper ( they were probably told to by the heads of BL as well). As the design of the CD carb had gone so well the design was handed over to Zenith who had had a hand in the design process.

The advantage the CD had was that due to an air/fuel bypass to the throttle mechanism on the overrun they found that the NOX was reduced considerably, so emissions were better overall, also partly due to the carb containing a temperature compensator which helps keep the temperature of the fuel going into the engine more constant whether hot or cold. Also the control of the choke system was better controlled than that of the SU, helping to make the carb slightly better on fuel.

These advantages made the Stomberg a better carb for cars which were going to countries that had more stringent emission laws like the US, And due to the simplicity in production line terms you would find some UK cars would have the Stomberg fitted to improve MPG and emissions over the SU.

SU saw the change in the market and redesigned the SU to the carb we see later fitted to BL models being the HIF carbs which moved the float bowl to become part of the main body and drillings within the body to reduce NOX. The last of the SU carbs were so good Austin Rover, then Rover fitted them to the then new K series engine in the last of the Metro's and were able to fit a catalyst to this engine without it being damaged by the fuel such was the advancement.

For the export market and especially the NA market Strombergs would have been fitted and would have been CD175's jetted accordingly.

An extra little note on carbs, the best way to control the fuel and air mix is by a variable venturi i.e. the SU and Stromberg carbs. Fixed jet carbs like the DCOE or DID type Webbers are a big compromise and are usually associated with performance due them being set up specifically for high speed high flow running and not very economical. Ford was so impressed with the SU that it bought its own version out called the VV carb. Lots of techs eyes now roll up, but when these carbs were working using Ford OE diaphragms they worked very well and one of these combined with the Ford CVH lean burn 1.4ltr was able to get its emissions down to below the required standard, 0.30co, without using a catalyst in the exhaust. It was only because the bureaucrats in Europe decreed that all cars must have a Lambda controlled and regulated catalyst that we saw the demise of the carburetor especially in smaller engines.
OK fingers worn out now lol.
 

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1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
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Discussion Starter #13
The carbs are both similar in performance, The SU slightly better for a higher performance engine. Triumph cars wanted to design their own carb in the early '60's due to the high cost of the SU carb, but they had to get around the patents that Su had on its carb since the early 1900's. They came up with a Constant Depression carb (CD part of the Stromberg carb.), but then there was a big mix up of BMC and other companies getting involved to end up as BL. So Triumph ended up being able to obtain SU carbs, as it was now a sister company under the BL umbrella, much cheaper ( they were probably told to by the heads of BL as well). As the design of the CD carb had gone so well the design was handed over to Zenith who had had a hand in the design process.

The advantage the CD had was that due to an air/fuel bypass to the throttle mechanism on the overrun they found that the NOX was reduced considerably, so emissions were better overall, also partly due to the carb containing a temperature compensator which helps keep the temperature of the fuel going into the engine more constant whether hot or cold. Also the control of the choke system was better controlled than that of the SU, helping to make the carb slightly better on fuel.

These advantages made the Stomberg a better carb for cars which were going to countries that had more stringent emission laws like the US, And due to the simplicity in production line terms you would find some UK cars would have the Stomberg fitted to improve MPG and emissions over the SU.

SU saw the change in the market and redesigned the SU to the carb we see later fitted to BL models being the HIF carbs which moved the float bowl to become part of the main body and drillings within the body to reduce NOX. The last of the SU carbs were so good Austin Rover, then Rover fitted them to the then new K series engine in the last of the Metro's and were able to fit a catalyst to this engine without it being damaged by the fuel such was the advancement.

For the export market and especially the NA market Strombergs would have been fitted and would have been CD175's jetted accordingly.

An extra little note on carbs, the best way to control the fuel and air mix is by a variable venturi i.e. the SU and Stromberg carbs. Fixed jet carbs like the DCOE or DID type Webbers are a big compromise and are usually associated with performance due them being set up specifically for high speed high flow running and not very economical. Ford was so impressed with the SU that it bought its own version out called the VV carb. Lots of techs eyes now roll up, but when these carbs were working using Ford OE diaphragms they worked very well and one of these combined with the Ford CVH lean burn 1.4ltr was able to get its emissions down to below the required standard, 0.30co, without using a catalyst in the exhaust. It was only because the bureaucrats in Europe decreed that all cars must have a Lambda controlled and regulated catalyst that we saw the demise of the carburetor especially in smaller engines.
OK fingers worn out now lol.
WOW. What an epic response. Thank you VERY much!! :clap:
 

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Rebild is the best answer, but for new carbs in the Uk there are companies like Rimmer bros, and Southern carbs who can probably help you, both have very good web sites. Or if you have no carbs I think that they were fitted with Stromberg cd175, there are usually a few on Ebay if not specifically for Range Rover they were a common carb on a lot of British cars, like Jaguar, P6 and Sd1 Rover (they also used the better SU carb HIF6 I think), so they are around or try some of the car breakers. If you get the right carb but for another model, say off of a Jaguar you can easily rebuild and rejet for your RRClassic, there isn't much to these carbs very easy to work on:thumb:
Greetings! Am very new to this forum. I have a 1974 RR Classic 2 dr with a dual carb Zenith - Stromberg 175 CD-2. That's the only thing missing to put the beauty on the road and I need experts opinion. The mechanic working on it tells me that the LH and RH Shaft needs to be replaced. Unfortunately, I can't find the two parts separately. As I am not as well versed as all of you are on the car stuff, any advise on best way to solve the problem is appreciated. Is there a carb I can substitute or rebuilding is the only/better option. Thank you in advance.
 

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Thanks for the heads up. There is also a rebuilt set for about 250. I may have to go that way since that's the only thing required for mine. Also, I am in talk with a relative in UK and checking if they can find them for cheaper for future parts... I am not well versed as many of you are here but I heard someone tell me that I could get an after market from Zenith provided some modifications are done by my mechanic. Not sure if that is a valid info. Will keep you updated.
 

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Above Link appears to offer rebuild kit including shafts, maybe of some use.

Strombergs also used on (vehicles of that period) volvo, saab, triumph stag dolomite etc, and may have vehicle specialist over there that could help you scource locally.

They also had slightly odd adjustment of mixture on RR fitment (that I'm aware of, but maybe all twin carb installation ) one carb fixed and the other one adjustable with a key tool. Routine is to use co meter in exhaust and move adjustable one to the point of lowest emmisions, at which point it would be balanced with the fixed carb. Sounds odd but does work.
 
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