RangeRovers.net Forum banner

1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Registered
1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
Joined
·
24 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Did anyone check the DTCs with diagnostics and got CAN bus related errors? when I drive the car at some shocks caused by uneven surface, I see all the warning lights related to DSC and ABS incl. Suspension Inactive message. The DTCs are not directly SAS related, they are CAN bus issue related. I have checked all CAN bus connected ECUs with following result - they are more or less the same in all 7 moduls after several probes :
- ABS ( this seems to be the main issue according to lights on dashboard )
SAS CAN error
Gearbox Control Unit CAN error
Engine Management System CAN error
- EAS ( it is also a main issue, but I guess it is only due the error in ABS modul )
CAN bus fault
- SAS
CAN bus off
- Transfer box
CAN bus off (0x52EA)
- Instrument Panel
CAN bus fault
No DMER1 received from EMS Ecu
- Engine Management System
U0121 - lost communication with ABS system control modul
U0101 - lost communication with TCM
- TCM ( transmission )
CAN bus Engine mangement system timeout
P1844 TCM CAN bus missing node EMS

this happens when I drive a while to find a place to stop

But if I drive only a short testdrive with immediate stops after the control lights come on, I always see CAN bur related DTCs ( CAN Bus fault or CAN Bus off ) in these 3 moduls of 7:
1) EAS - but it is always a derivated fault , caused by ABS faults , so it is not important for investigation
2) ABS - SAS CAN error, and sometimes, but not always EAT CAN error
3) SAS - CAN bus OFF

CAN bus itself seems to be ok, there is approx. 120 Ohm, where it needs to be, and except from very few cases at the beginning of the tests there is no evidence of interruption in communication between engine and tranny during the drive.

The most interesting is the CAN bus OFF fault in SAS modul - there are 3 CAN error states based on CAN docu, and CAN bus OFF is only if the TEC overflow on 8 bit - so it is more than 255 try without success. So it could be, that SAS "suddenly" ( caused by gently shock from street ) loosing connection, and needs to OFF for a while. This causes faults in ABS, and these causes faults in EAS. At least, this is my theory by now.
If it would be an error in data - some kind of data discepancy or missing data, - there would be another kind of DTC about sensor issue or similar. But there is no communication, and I have checked ( at least I tried ) all earth and feed wires for these ECUs, and I didn t find any loose or damaged connection.
I don t have osciloscope, so I can check only stored DTCs or live data via diagnostic socket- if I test life data from ABS and SAS during drive, they are just freezed when the issue does appears, and lights come on.

Does anybody have an Idea have to ensure where is the issue? without osciloscope and a new spare part .. :)
 

·
Registered
2002-2005 Range Rover MkIII / L322
Joined
·
174 Posts
Sounds like mine did when the SAS went out - if you have access to allcomms it will show you the angle to see if it's working..
 

·
Registered
1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
Joined
·
24 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
the 02-05 version of L322 I have covered only with third party diagnostics only, but I can perfectly read error messages and live data. My friend does have a T4 for case I need to setup new modul, etc.. Anyway, I can see SAS angle perfectly, and it works, until the fallout, and this fallout is happening always during ride only, I wasn t able to reproduce the error on place. During the ride, I have a special part of street with some holes, and there is the perfect place to test the error - after the shock from wheel it comes for sure.

This is my biggest issue, that I can reproduce DTCs only with drive the car, and even if something went wrong, in the next moment everything is fine again, except moduls, where DTCs are stored, and moduls which are temporary blocked due the DTCs ... :-(
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
174 Posts
You might try using some contact cleaner on the connectors, which may have corrosion on them due to age. One other thing that might cause these issues might be the suspension height sensors, which may also be corroded. Driving the vehicle can create some rapidly changing readings, which, if they are caused by corrosion, can create "confusion" due to readings changing too quickly to be "real." Ray
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,444 Posts
Pooh-
I had experienced a problem on my '03 years ago, which I was able to isolate by pulling the fuse for the SAS (when I thought it might be something else on that fuse). I also disconnected the SAS to isolate it to that. Everything else worked fine after pulling the SAS, although the steering was tougher at lower speeds with it disconnected of course.
 

·
Registered
1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
Joined
·
24 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Hi Ray, today I performed a set of test. Also checked the height sensors as you suggested, but they seems to be in norm - no extreme values, nor if I got the fault again.
 

·
Registered
1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
Joined
·
24 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
the SAS has 2 fuses: Fuse 13 is a permanent feed, and Fuse 51. The issue with the Fuse 51, that this is for ABS too - when I pull out I get immediately an ABS error, which cause an EAS error as well, so not usable for this test. Then I tried Fuse 13. Here nothing went wrong, but during drive SAS is feeded via Fuse 51 as well, so even if Fuse 13 was pulled out, SAS was still working, I was still able to watch angle sensor value via diagnostics.
 

·
Registered
1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
Joined
·
24 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Today I performed a lot of tests, re-checked cables and earths - all seems to be ok. As I said, based on my opinion, the issue will be (most probably) not in EAS, as EAS only holding a Can bus error fault, caused by ABS modul. Each time I got EAS error, ABS got errors too, and it was enough to delete ABS faults to make EAS operative again.

Today I got two ABS errors: Gearbox control fault (always) and SAS can fault (sometimes). And if I got ABS error, it was a CAN bus off fault in SAS as well. But because of Gearbox control fault, I started to suspect Gearbox ECU, especially, when I saw, that wires for Gearbox ECU seems to be OK, but the ECU itself get feed from EMS via a relay - and this relay was relative loose in the box. It is a blue relay, I re-plugged it, and tried to make it more fix, with less move, and I had a feeling that makes a difference, I needed a more harsh shock to get to the errors - but I got the errors. I was pretty sure that I did find the issue, so I went to my friend with a '03 Td6, which has the same relay to try it - but even with a good working relay I got the errors again :x

And to have something new: during the tests it was late evening and dark, and I realized, that headlights are pointing somewhere into the sky. In the lightcheck modul I saw only EAS inactive error caused by eas, so I guess it was only a resultat, not a reason. But even with no faults at all, headlights are pointing into the sky ...:-(
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
174 Posts
If you observe the vehicle from the side, does it appear that the front is high, or the rear is low? It is possible for the ABS to observe the height sensors for two reasons: 1 to determine the severity of the braking, and two to modulate the braking based on the suspension height. Just saying. Ray
 

·
Registered
1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
Joined
·
24 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
The vehicle seems to be in correct height, front and rear are ok. Today I recalibrated the high sensors. Everything was ok, except 2 interesting things. The first, that based on my experience the distance from the bottom of rim to wheelarch used to be more for the front wheel as for the rear one. Today it was 754-753 mm for all 4 wheels. After the calibration I checked the offset overview values via diagnostics, and in front it was 648 or something near ( I don t remember the exact value ) for both, but different for rear wheels 526 and 468 or similar ( again, exact value I don t remember, but the difference was so much plus minus )
I also recalibrated the headlights, but they are pointing still into the sky...

The second interesting thing was that I specially watched the operation of the gearbox - the reason for that was that in ABS I always got an Gearbox control unit CAN error, and the SAS error came only few time, not always. Then I saw, that at least one times I had issue to connect to the transmission ECU. Then I discovered, that via tranny ECU I can see the live data about wheel speed too - via ABS it is possible until a max. speed approx. 12 km/h. And the speed of wheels was not correct. To ensure I see the correct information, I did test:
- if I was watching wheel speed via ABS modul live data, the speed for all four wheels was correct, and the same - until I reached 12 km/h, then it was freezed and switched off, but this is the normal behavior, I guess
- but if I was watching the wheel speed via EAT (automatic gearbox) unit, the front left wheel said it is moving exactly twice as the other 3 ( 20 if the others 10, and 30 if the others 15, as example ). And none of the speed was correct, because I was moving 50, the front left wheel showed 40, and the rest of 3 wheels showed 20.

I wasn t able to find out where the wheel speed information for EAT is coming from. I mean, it should be from ABS modul via CAN, but I don t know what is the normal behavior - are the signals corrected, or otherwise modified for EAT? Can somebody explain?
 

·
Registered
1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
Joined
·
24 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
I would like to inform you about the end of this great mystery:

on the RH side of the engine of L322 is the so called E-box. The engine and gearbox ECUs are here, and few other electrical things. There is also a small fuse box, with 5 fuses, and these fuses in the box, plus some wire in abroad - mostly feeds, lot of feed wire , - had loose contacts.
There is directly connected the power relay for engine ECU, and when I tried to change this relay, I was pretty close. So close, that for a while I thought I found it - most probably during the change I moved with the wires to and this made them more fix for a while.

So the final result is, that due this loose connectors and fuses, even the smallest vibration caused a loss of feed - just for a tiny moment, - in one of three ECUs: engine and gearbox (in E-box), and tranfer box (behind the battery). these are interconnected and shares also some feeds or uses signals from each other. The loss of power or signals was so short, that caused outage only in communication via CAN bus. All the elements worked again within a fragment of second, only a DTC about the loss of communication were recognized and reported in ECUs - if even.

The suspension inactive message was the only recognizable failure. And that was just because 7 main units are interconnected via CAN bus in early L322, and when one of them ( either engine, gearbox or transferbox ECU) falled out, caused a CAN bus outage - this caused practically the outage of communicaton between these elements, and ABS ECU is one of them as well, and just this loss of communication with ABS caused an error in Air Suspension Unit.

As I said, the outage was very short, and after the self-restoration of the CAN bus communication all units where in working state again. I guess because of safety planning: ABS is a very important unit, and even if there is an error, but then the unit can work again, it should work, to keep the vehicle in safe.
But not the EAS - the air suspension is constructed since the beginning ( at least in P38 as well), that if you have an issue, it will be blocked until the issue will be solved and the DTC needs to be erased manually.

Long story, short end:
the only recognizable issue (suspension inactive) was only a secondary issue, caused by outage of CAN bus and so outage of important units for air suspension. The primary issue, the CAN outage was caused by outage of some feeds due loose connectors, and there was nothing to check but some DTCs about communication issues - it wasn”t even possible to determine which of units falled out first.

Due the nature of issue, it was not possible to simulate in static state, only duringdrive, and also was nothing to check or to measure, because the original issue disappeared in a fragment of second.

The only possible way I see was to use an osciloscope and do a lot of measurments. I ordered a car osciloscope, but when it arrived, I already solved the problem.

Now the car is running and driving since 2 months at least ( ones had a flat battery , just because of Range Rover :-D )
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
I would like to inform you about the end of this great mystery:

on the RH side of the engine of L322 is the so called E-box. The engine and gearbox ECUs are here, and few other electrical things. There is also a small fuse box, with 5 fuses, and these fuses in the box, plus some wire in abroad - mostly feeds, lot of feed wire , - had loose contacts.
There is directly connected the power relay for engine ECU, and when I tried to change this relay, I was pretty close. So close, that for a while I thought I found it - most probably during the change I moved with the wires to and this made them more fix for a while.

So the final result is, that due this loose connectors and fuses, even the smallest vibration caused a loss of feed - just for a tiny moment, - in one of three ECUs: engine and gearbox (in E-box), and tranfer box (behind the battery). these are interconnected and shares also some feeds or uses signals from each other. The loss of power or signals was so short, that caused outage only in communication via CAN bus. All the elements worked again within a fragment of second, only a DTC about the loss of communication were recognized and reported in ECUs - if even.

The suspension inactive message was the only recognizable failure. And that was just because 7 main units are interconnected via CAN bus in early L322, and when one of them ( either engine, gearbox or transferbox ECU) falled out, caused a CAN bus outage - this caused practically the outage of communicaton between these elements, and ABS ECU is one of them as well, and just this loss of communication with ABS caused an error in Air Suspension Unit.

As I said, the outage was very short, and after the self-restoration of the CAN bus communication all units where in working state again. I guess because of safety planning: ABS is a very important unit, and even if there is an error, but then the unit can work again, it should work, to keep the vehicle in safe.
But not the EAS - the air suspension is constructed since the beginning ( at least in P38 as well), that if you have an issue, it will be blocked until the issue will be solved and the DTC needs to be erased manually.

Long story, short end:
the only recognizable issue (suspension inactive) was only a secondary issue, caused by outage of CAN bus and so outage of important units for air suspension. The primary issue, the CAN outage was caused by outage of some feeds due loose connectors, and there was nothing to check but some DTCs about communication issues - it wasn”t even possible to determine which of units falled out first.

Due the nature of issue, it was not possible to simulate in static state, only duringdrive, and also was nothing to check or to measure, because the original issue disappeared in a fragment of second.

The only possible way I see was to use an osciloscope and do a lot of measurments. I ordered a car osciloscope, but when it arrived, I already solved the problem.

Now the car is running and driving since 2 months at least ( ones had a flat battery , just because of Range Rover :-D )
Hi 1 quick question, when the Air suspension failure showed on dash did it deflate all 4 corners then suddenly show normal height selected and pump car up again.
My car has multiple canbus no communication errors along with the suspension fault but only shows suspension fault on dash. This happened suddenly while on motorway.
Regards
 

·
Registered
1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
Joined
·
24 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Hi 1 quick question, when the Air suspension failure showed on dash did it deflate all 4 corners then suddenly show normal height selected and pump car up again.
My car has multiple canbus no communication errors along with the suspension fault but only shows suspension fault on dash. This happened suddenly while on motorway.
Regards
Hi, would be nice to see the errors including the one in air suspension unit. I would say, if you have had canbus communication errors, the origin could be everywhere, and most probably not directly in air suspension. But strange is the deflating, which normally would not necesserely happen. Even a slight difference could mean something, so please put here what the car says exactly, if possible.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Hi, would be nice to see the errors including the one in air suspension unit. I would say, if you have had canbus communication errors, the origin could be everywhere, and most probably not directly in air suspension. But strange is the deflating, which normally would not necesserely happen. Even a slight difference could mean something, so please put here what the car says exactly, if possible.
Hi
Hi, would be nice to see the errors including the one in air suspension unit. I would say, if you have had canbus communication errors, the origin could be everywhere, and most probably not directly in air suspension. But strange is the deflating, which normally would not necesserely happen. Even a slight difference could mean something, so please put here what the car says exactly, if possible.
hi thanks for your reply.
here is the full diagnostic report. It was done using Launch.
Thanks for looking
Regards
Ian
Diagnostic Scan
Vehicle diagnostic report
Shop Name:phone:
VIN: SALLMAM23AA324741
Year: 2010
Make: Landrover
Model: Range Rover
Odometer: 169251km
Vehicle Software Version: V33.51 Diagnostic Application Version: 3.11.012 Test Time: 2019-09-28 18:42:02
Tester: Ian
Diagnostic path: Automatically Search > Health Report
Diagnostic Result
Fault
ABS (Anti-lock Braking System)
IPC (Instrument cluster control module)
( 14 )
Inspection Result
( 4 )
( 16 )
Abnormal
Abnormal
U0001-88 High speed CAN communication bus Historic
U0100-00 Lost communication with engine control Historic module/powertrain control module 'A'
U0126-00 Lost communication with steering angle sensor Historic module
U0421-68 Invalid data received from ride level control Intermittent module
B12FE-09 Fan Historic
B12FE-13 Fan Intermittent
U0001-88 High speed CAN communication bus Intermittent
U0100-00 Lost communication with engine control Historic module/powertrain control module 'A'
U0101-00 Lost communication with transmission control Historic module
U0102-00 Lost communication with transfer case control Historic module
U0121-00 Lost communication with ABS control module Historic
U0126-00 Lost communication with steering angle sensor Historic module
U0128-00 Lost communication with parking brake control Intermittent module
U0132-00 Lost communication with suspension control Historic module A
U0138-00 Lost communication with all terrain control Historic module
U0139-08 Lost communication with the suspension control Historic module B
U0141-00 Lost communication with the body control Historic module A

U0151-00 Lost communication with restraints control Historic module
U0159-00 Lost communication with parking assist control Historic module
U0241-00 Lost communication with the headlamp control Historic module A
BCM (Body control module)
( 17 )
Abnormal
B100D-96 Column lock authorisation Historic
B1B01-87 Key transponder Historic
U0121-00 Lost communication with ABS control module Historic
U0138-00 Lost communication with all terrain control Historic module
U0241-00 Lost communication with the headlamp control Historic module A
U0128-00 Lost communication with parking brake control Intermittent module
U0100-00 Lost communication with engine control Historic module/powertrain control module 'A'
U0151-00 Lost communication with restraints control Historic module
U0102-00 Lost communication with transfer case control Historic module
U0101-00 Lost communication with transmission control Historic module
B1087-88 LIN bus A Historic
B1088-88 LIN bus B Historic
B11D1-88 Local interconnect network bus C Historic
B12C9-88 Local interconnection network bus E Historic
U0001-88 High speed CAN communication bus Historic
B1A76-15 Fuel sender 2 circuit Historic
B1A76-1c Fuel sender 2 circuit Historic
RLM (Ride level control module)
( 9 )
Abnormal
C1A04-78 Front right height sensor Historic
U0122-00 Lost communication with vehicle dynamics Historic control module
U0416-68 Invalid data received from vehicle dynamics Historic control module
U0140-00 Lost communication with body control module Historic
U0100-00 Lost communication with engine control Historic module/powertrain control module 'A'
U0126-00 Lost communication with steering angle sensor Historic module
U0138-00 Lost communication with all terrain control Historic module
U0073-88 Control module communication bus off Historic
C1A07-62 Cross articulation Intermittent
SASM (Steering angle sensor module)
SUMB (Adaptive damping control module)
( 1 )
U0001-88 High speed CAN communication bus
( 3 )
Abnormal
Historic
Abnormal
U0121-00 Lost communication with ABS control module
Historic

U0100-00 Lost communication with engine control Historic module/powertrain control module 'A'
U0422-68 Invalid data received from the body control Historic module
ATCM (All terrain control module)
HCM (Headlamp Control Module)
( 6 )
Abnormal
U0140-00 Lost communication with body control module Historic
U0100-00 Lost communication with engine control Historic module/powertrain control module 'A'
U0121-00 Lost communication with ABS control module Historic
U0132-00 Lost communication with ride level control Historic module
U0001-88 High speed CAN communication bus Historic
U0300-55 Internal control module software incompatibility Historic
( 8 )
Abnormal
B1D64-87 Left headlamp swivelling motor circuit Historic
B1D65-87 Right headlamp swivelling motor circuit Historic
U0121-00 Lost communication with ABS control module Historic
U0126-00 Lost communication with steering angle sensor Historic module
U0140-00 Lost communication with body control module Historic
U0142-00 Lost communication with body control module B Historic
U0300-00 Internal control module software incompatibility Historic
U3002-81 Vehicle identification number Historic
PBM (Parking brake control module)
( 8 )
Abnormal
U0402-00 Invalid data received from transmission control Historic module
U0403-00 Invalid data received from transfer case control Historic module
U0073-88 Control module communication bus off Historic
U0102-00 Lost communication with transfer case control Historic module
U0101-00 Lost communication with transmission control Historic module
U0100-00 Lost communication with engine control Historic module/powertrain control module 'A'
U0121-00 Lost communication with ABS control module Historic
U0140-00 Lost communication with body control module Historic
TCCM (Transfer case control module)
( 9 )
Abnormal
U0001-88 High speed CAN communication bus Intermittent
U0121-00 Lost communication with ABS control module Intermittent
U0100-00 Lost communication with engine control Intermittent module/powertrain control module 'A'
U0128-00 Lost communication with parking brake control Intermittent module
U0101-00 Lost communication with transmission control Intermittent module
U0126-00 Lost communication with steering angle sensor Intermittent module
U0140-00 Lost communication with body control module Intermittent

U0132-00 Lost communication with ride level control Intermittent module
U0138-00 Lost communication with all terrain control Intermittent module
VIM (Vehicle immobilizer control module)
ACM (Audio front control module)
SCME (Driver's climate seat module)
DABM (Digital audio broadcast module)
ECM (Engine Control Module)
TCM (Transmission control module)
SRS (Supplemental Inflatable Restraint System)
DDM (Driver's door module)
DSM (Driver's seat module)
HVAC (Heating ventilation and air conditioning control module)
RFA (Keyless vehicle module)
PAM (Parking assist control module)
PDM (Passenger's door module)
AAM (Audio amplifier module)
APIM (Accessory protocol interface module)
CDP (CD Player control module)
GEM (General electronics control module)
TEL (Cellular telephone control module)
TVM (Television module)
( 1 )
B100D-16 Column lock authorisation
( 2 )
( 1 )
U0140-00 Lost communication with body control module
Abnormal
Historic
Abnormal
Abnormal
Intermittent
Abnormal
Normal Normal Normal
Normal Normal Normal
Normal Normal Normal Normal Normal
Normal Normal
Normal Normal
U2003-86 Fibre optic communication bus Historic
U0159-00 Lost communication with parking assist control Intermittent module
( 1 )
U3000-55 Control module Permanent
Normal
( 15 )
 

·
Registered
1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
Joined
·
24 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
here we have a slightly different situation, I guess. First of all, is different car, it is a facelifted version, can see from the modul and DTC information, also the head of the report shows 2010 for year - is it a first facelift from 2006 up to 2010, or a second one from 2010? What engine you have? 2010 was the year of the change, also with mixed versions ...

Here I see almost only communication errors :) , even if mostly historic. Launch is an excellent third party diagnostics, and really good for Land Rover as well, however the factory SDD can group the DTCs in different ways, as example align it by mileage, not only by units - so you can see immediately which DTCs are related to the latest issue with the car.

Usually the DTCs marked as Historic are not so important, more which ares Permanent or at least Intermittend, but this is not always the rule. As example the particular issue was caused by the problem, which generated a DTC during your ride, but now, let say at home, when you put on Launch and read all the codes, the particular one is already Historic. So sometimes it' s a bit tricky to get to the right - not answer, not yet :) , but to the right starting point :) .

So it is not easy, but as for now I see lot of issues related to CAN bus outage or communication error ( if it is a first facelift, there are 4 networks and from 4 networks are 2 CANs, for the second facelift I am not sure if there is not even more ), but also one interesting DTC:
'U0421-68 Invalid data received from ride level control'

I would start in two directions:

1. to check the communication error background. Would be nice to have the info about freeze frame data, to know if it happened at the time when you got in the trouble. This could have diverse backgrounds, as example issue in the gateway unit, or kind of issue like the famous transmission connector issue which could get oily, then can cause misfunctionality, and so. Or wiring/fuse issue.

2. to check and get a closer look to the issue in connection with ride level modul related DTC. I also saw an another error code in the list:
C1A07-62 Cross articulation
C1A04-78 Front right height sensor


if you did experienced this issues without the vehicle been lifted or in terraine, where the extreme wheel articulation can happen, the I would suggest to check the high sensors. I also saw in the past, that a high sensor just got crazy, and from time to time got loosed the signal. Fortunately Launch is capable to read live data as well, but sometimes it is also visible on 4x4 control monitor of the car, where you can see the ride level of each wheel. It can loose the signal and this can cause that it is like one wheel just fall down, and this makes the system crazy, and iniciate a try to solve and get the car in the correct niveau - that could be an exponation for the deflating you experienced during your ride.


thats are my suggestions for now. May be, or may be not true ...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
here we have a slightly different situation, I guess. First of all, is different car, it is a facelifted version, can see from the modul and DTC information, also the head of the report shows 2010 for year - is it a first facelift from 2006 up to 2010, or a second one from 2010? What engine you have? 2010 was the year of the change, also with mixed versions ...

Here I see almost only communication errors :) , even if mostly historic. Launch is an excellent third party diagnostics, and really good for Land Rover as well, however the factory SDD can group the DTCs in different ways, as example align it by mileage, not only by units - so you can see immediately which DTCs are related to the latest issue with the car.

Usually the DTCs marked as Historic are not so important, more which ares Permanent or at least Intermittend, but this is not always the rule. As example the particular issue was caused by the problem, which generated a DTC during your ride, but now, let say at home, when you put on Launch and read all the codes, the particular one is already Historic. So sometimes it' s a bit tricky to get to the right - not answer, not yet :) , but to the right starting point :) .

So it is not easy, but as for now I see lot of issues related to CAN bus outage or communication error ( if it is a first facelift, there are 4 networks and from 4 networks are 2 CANs, for the second facelift I am not sure if there is not even more ), but also one interesting DTC:
'U0421-68 Invalid data received from ride level control'

I would start in two directions:

1. to check the communication error background. Would be nice to have the info about freeze frame data, to know if it happened at the time when you got in the trouble. This could have diverse backgrounds, as example issue in the gateway unit, or kind of issue like the famous transmission connector issue which could get oily, then can cause misfunctionality, and so. Or wiring/fuse issue.

2. to check and get a closer look to the issue in connection with ride level modul related DTC. I also saw an another error code in the list:
C1A07-62 Cross articulation
C1A04-78 Front right height sensor


if you did experienced this issues without the vehicle been lifted or in terraine, where the extreme wheel articulation can happen, the I would suggest to check the high sensors. I also saw in the past, that a high sensor just got crazy, and from time to time got loosed the signal. Fortunately Launch is capable to read live data as well, but sometimes it is also visible on 4x4 control monitor of the car, where you can see the ride level of each wheel. It can loose the signal and this can cause that it is like one wheel just fall down, and this makes the system crazy, and iniciate a try to solve and get the car in the correct niveau - that could be an exponation for the deflating you experienced during your ride.


thats are my suggestions for now. May be, or may be not true ...
Thanks for your information
The engine is 3.6 V8. The car is driving perfect again with no faults showing on the dash (TFT screen type) i did switch the screen to show 4x4 information but all 4 level sensors were going up and down with no pattern. My return journey I took back roads and it did it again but nothing since I connected Launch. I did find a very soft tyre on left rear (puncture) now repaired. I will start exploring tomorrow, thanks again
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
here we have a slightly different situation, I guess. First of all, is different car, it is a facelifted version, can see from the modul and DTC information, also the head of the report shows 2010 for year - is it a first facelift from 2006 up to 2010, or a second one from 2010? What engine you have? 2010 was the year of the change, also with mixed versions ...

Here I see almost only communication errors :) , even if mostly historic. Launch is an excellent third party diagnostics, and really good for Land Rover as well, however the factory SDD can group the DTCs in different ways, as example align it by mileage, not only by units - so you can see immediately which DTCs are related to the latest issue with the car.

Usually the DTCs marked as Historic are not so important, more which ares Permanent or at least Intermittend, but this is not always the rule. As example the particular issue was caused by the problem, which generated a DTC during your ride, but now, let say at home, when you put on Launch and read all the codes, the particular one is already Historic. So sometimes it' s a bit tricky to get to the right - not answer, not yet :) , but to the right starting point :) .

So it is not easy, but as for now I see lot of issues related to CAN bus outage or communication error ( if it is a first facelift, there are 4 networks and from 4 networks are 2 CANs, for the second facelift I am not sure if there is not even more ), but also one interesting DTC:
'U0421-68 Invalid data received from ride level control'

I would start in two directions:

1. to check the communication error background. Would be nice to have the info about freeze frame data, to know if it happened at the time when you got in the trouble. This could have diverse backgrounds, as example issue in the gateway unit, or kind of issue like the famous transmission connector issue which could get oily, then can cause misfunctionality, and so. Or wiring/fuse issue.

2. to check and get a closer look to the issue in connection with ride level modul related DTC. I also saw an another error code in the list:
C1A07-62 Cross articulation
C1A04-78 Front right height sensor


if you did experienced this issues without the vehicle been lifted or in terraine, where the extreme wheel articulation can happen, the I would suggest to check the high sensors. I also saw in the past, that a high sensor just got crazy, and from time to time got loosed the signal. Fortunately Launch is capable to read live data as well, but sometimes it is also visible on 4x4 control monitor of the car, where you can see the ride level of each wheel. It can loose the signal and this can cause that it is like one wheel just fall down, and this makes the system crazy, and iniciate a try to solve and get the car in the correct niveau - that could be an exponation for the deflating you experienced during your ride.


thats are my suggestions for now. May be, or may be not true ...
 

·
Registered
2010-2012 Range Rover MkIII / L322
Joined
·
405 Posts
Given that your high speed and mid speed can busses show extreme loss of communication amongst so many modules you should begin with a full load test on the battery (before going down other rabbit trails).

Don’t skip this part or you’ll end up spending a lot more than the $200 it’ll cost for a perfect battery.* see foot note

IF the battery tests as good as new, is there ANY possibility that your car could have previously been flooded?

IF yes, it may be still be fixable but you’ll basically need to inspect each and every connector pin for corrosion (bad = it’ll look like a light green coating or dull finish on multiple terminals/pins, depending whether powered when wet - versus - a bright, shiny finish = good).

IF it’s never been flooded/wet within the cabin, start in the right front A-post area and look at the three very large plastic multi-plugs as all those carry some or all of the power from the battery to the central junction box (CJB), which is the large combined fuse box/body control module mounted behind the lower glovebox, and connect the right side engine harness to the right side body harness passing through the firewall/bulkhead.

With SDD connected and on the same can comm check page as your screenshot, with the ignition on, jostle each of those multi-plugs and and run the comm check again to see if there’s any change in HS and or MS modules coming on line or dropping off.

The power to the rear fuse box also is connected in the right A-post area (the thick red cable secured with the 10mm nuts).

Check those 10mm nuts for tightness, as well as looking for evidence of corrosion.

I’ve yet to find any which loosen over time but just in case it’s been previously disturbed/repaired you should ensure they’re tight too.

Rob

* (fwiw, if this was my car I’d go buy a new battery anyway, as a first step).
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top