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1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
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Discussion Starter #1
Getting ready to put the heads back on and I want to be sure the followers are in good shape. How do you determine if they are still good (aside from obvious physical signs)?

I also noticed that the push rod for the #8 cylinder was slightly bent - is this because the follower went bad? Not sure what would cause it.
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover Classic
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often times the reason for a bent push rod is often improper or loss of timing thus leading to valve/piston contact a bent valve if a possible result as well.
when inspecting lifters you're looking for wear at the cam lobe contact AKA the seat of the lifter. pitting chipping and cupping are some of the issues associated, sticking lifter pistons, missing piston clips, worn piston cup (where the push rod fits) and pitting of said area.
when replacing cams it is advisable to install new lifters, if reusing cam and lifters, keep them in order do not mix positions.
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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222 Posts
often times the reason for a bent push rod is often improper or loss of timing thus leading to valve/piston contact a bent valve if a possible result as well.
when inspecting lifters you're looking for wear at the cam lobe contact AKA the seat of the lifter. pitting chipping and cupping are some of the issues associated, sticking lifter pistons, missing piston clips, worn piston cup (where the push rod fits) and pitting of said area.
when replacing cams it is advisable to install new lifters, if reusing cam and lifters, keep them in order do not mix positions.
/\This.
If you have had piston to valve contact, then timing gears and chain are essential items to do NOW, and at the same time, I would also have a good look at the cam itself, they tend to run the lobes off and it's often not noticeable at idle. Turn the engine over and look at each lobe for wear.
Personally, I'd do the cam, gears, chain and followers at this point, too, seeing as the engine is open anyway. If you decide to do the cam later, you will need to remove the intake and valley pan gasket anyway, so you save time doing it now.
 

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1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
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Discussion Starter #4
There was no damage to piston, or valves - follower was also fine. I also inspected the cam (still plenty of lift) and I did replace the timing chain and the timing gear. With all that considered, i'm thinking the rod was probably bent in the old engine (probably why the PO swapped the block). I've ordered a new one on ebay and hopefully it gets here before the weekend so I can button this thing up!
 

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There are all these discussions about cam-follower issues, which frankly is a bit of an archaic technical solution. With changes in oil composition (reduction in Zinc to extend life of o2 sensor) there are plenty of examples here cams have been eaten away.

The consensus is that you keep the followers in the correct order (don't swap them around) and when you change the followers you change the cam and vice versa.

There is also a lot of voodoo stuff about breaking in the cam and additives to oil. In any case regular oil changes are very important with this design engine.

What I am saying is that you should not take the can/follower situation too lightly and unless you have a perfectly fine looking setup you might want to consider swapping some more.
 
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