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2004 4.4 V8 Vogue in Silver.
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Discussion Starter #21
Wow, I couldnt have asked for a more full and insightful response! Thank you ever so much for taking the time and effort to write it, it really is appreciated. Incidentally I watched that video that compared the Amazon oil and was astounded with the results. It really is amazingly good stuff especially at the price. Thanks again.
 

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2004 4.4 V8 Vogue in Silver.
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16 Posts
Discussion Starter #22
Forgot to say I have a wonderful old Henry Milnes lathe that is older than me but in much better condition. It leaks oil out of it's gearbox and it has a couple of quirks but I can make most things on it. I also have a small model makers lathe (peatol) so I can make most things. I used to build steam engines for a hobby so making parts for the car should be possible. Here's one I made earlier. Nothing to do with RR's I know but what the heck.
 

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2002-2005 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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158 Posts
Wow, a beautiful locomotive there! Very cool and impressive. A few months ago I traveled to see the Union Pacific "Big Boy" steam locomotive chug down the tracks, a restored and fully operational 1941 locomotive that at 133 feet long and 1.2 million pounds was -- and still is -- the world's largest steam pup. Truly a kewl monster, one that travels across the western U.S. every so often.
 

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2002-2005 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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109 Posts
@TCValencia:

For the Vanos system: Impossible to really say, but in my opinion, I think most M62TUs that have been treated right should have functional, albeit not perfectly sealing, Vanos systems up to 100k miles. Anything after that is suspect and an owner should consider replacing seals at a minimum.

For the timing chain guides lifespan: If I happened to buy an M62-based car with, let's say 50,000 miles, I would replace the guides as a preventive measure at no more than 70,000 miles, yes I've heard murmurings of M62 guides failing at that mileage. And then repeat with a second guide change at 150,000 miles. Another thing is the timing chain tensioner, if I'm not mistaken, got a design update during the M62 lifespan. So there's a chance that the tensioner (hydraulic and dependent on oil pressure) in your M62 could have a new version available. It's worth changing and can be done without removing anything really, in about 15 minutes.

@thorcusmodee:

Cool hobby and nice looking train engine! Since you mentioned it, if you have any desire in learning and working with the Vanos units, it could be a big help to the community. Could you review the below video and let us know if you think you could be capable of doing any of these steps: 1. Vanos cutting (disassembly), 2. cutting fine threads into the exterior of the vanos housing, and 3. machining of a new aluminum ring?

 

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2004 4.4 V8 Vogue in Silver.
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Discussion Starter #25
Wow, a beautiful locomotive there! Very cool and impressive. A few months ago I traveled to see the Union Pacific "Big Boy" steam locomotive chug down the tracks, a restored and fully operational 1941 locomotive that at 133 feet long and 1.2 million pounds was -- and still is -- the world's largest steam pup. Truly a kewl monster, one that travels across the western U.S. every so often.
Oh you lucky man!! When I was a child my father had a model railway and we used to visit the model shop quite often to see what they had to make a good addition to his layout. They got in this model of a Big Boy, I had never seen or heard of it before and was completely in awe of the size and scale of it. even in mode form it was a most impressive site. I quite often trawl the internet these days looking for video footage of them and would love to see one in the flesh some day. It's on the bucket list :)
 

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2004 4.4 V8 Vogue in Silver.
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Discussion Starter #26
@TCValencia:

For the Vanos system: Impossible to really say, but in my opinion, I think most M62TUs that have been treated right should have functional, albeit not perfectly sealing, Vanos systems up to 100k miles. Anything after that is suspect and an owner should consider replacing seals at a minimum.

For the timing chain guides lifespan: If I happened to buy an M62-based car with, let's say 50,000 miles, I would replace the guides as a preventive measure at no more than 70,000 miles, yes I've heard murmurings of M62 guides failing at that mileage. And then repeat with a second guide change at 150,000 miles. Another thing is the timing chain tensioner, if I'm not mistaken, got a design update during the M62 lifespan. So there's a chance that the tensioner (hydraulic and dependent on oil pressure) in your M62 could have a new version available. It's worth changing and can be done without removing anything really, in about 15 minutes.

@thorcusmodee:

Cool hobby and nice looking train engine! Since you mentioned it, if you have any desire in learning and working with the Vanos units, it could be a big help to the community. Could you review the below video and let us know if you think you could be capable of doing any of these steps: 1. Vanos cutting (disassembly), 2. cutting fine threads into the exterior of the vanos housing, and 3. machining of a new aluminum ring?

Can't see that being too much of a problem. I have to go and collect my Rangie in a while so I will have a proper look later. I don't speak Russian so I may struggle a bit but I will have a look :)
 

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2002-2005 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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Hi folks, newby here just got a Rangie with the 4.4 lump in it. I have read some disturbing things about cam chain guides going out on these cars. Mine appears to be silent but I can't help wondering how much of a prob;em this really is. I have searched extensively and seen loads of BMW threads discussing it although these seem to be mainly in the USofA. My car has done 113000 miles it's an 03, I have no idea if the guides have been done or not. Just wondering if anyone has experienced failure? Thanks in advance.
I have 6 L322s and have replaced two guides in the bunch. All have 100k +.
 

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2010-2012 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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11 Posts
Hi folks, newby here just got a Rangie with the 4.4 lump in it. I have read some disturbing things about cam chain guides going out on these cars. Mine appears to be silent but I can't help wondering how much of a prob;em this really is. I have searched extensively and seen loads of BMW threads discussing it although these seem to be mainly in the USofA. My car has done 113000 miles it's an 03, I have no idea if the guides have been done or not. Just wondering if anyone has experienced failure? Thanks in advance.
I got the Vanos rattle around 180000Kms. So after seeing it was easy to fix, I read up on the other things that go wrong with the M62 motor in the 03 L322. Things like timing failure, membrane failure in the oil recovery module on the back of the manifold/head, rotten oil recovery pipes from this module, oil leaking into the plug voids on the heads. So I bought the bits and printed out the 'how to' info and got the special tools needed. All was true and needed replacing except for the main timing chain which was OK, but maybe slightly loose. I put in a new hydraulic tensioner for the lower timing chain but it was not needed as the old one was perfect. The lower timing chain guides were perfect. But since I bought them from Island 4X4 in the UK, I fitted them too. The vanos seals repair seemed scary, but it was really easy with hot water on the lounge table in a warm room. The compression nut and bolt kit worked well to push down the lip of the vanos onto the new seals. The Jesus bolt on the crankshaft requires a 3/4 inch breaker bar and 6 foot of steel pipe as a handle. So I made a lump or channel to jam the crank pully against the body while this was removed. While doing this I put in a new water pump, quite cheap, and serviced the alternator which also did not need it. But I put in new parts anyway. If I had left the large timing chain in place, I could have left the Jesus bolt in its heavenly position, but at least I could renew the timing cover oil seal with it removed. There is a cast metal water pipe that goes onto the back of the heads with the outlet to the heater. The gaskets turn to mush, so replace them and cover with gasket goo to seal them as stupidly that are slightly soluble. The timing tools I used were BMW but I suspect Range Rover changed this timing a little. Now I have a little less power at low RPM, but at about 2000 rpm the nose lifts and she really fires up with a very pleasing exhaust note. Often have to throttle back quickly as other cars come up so fast. The top 2 timing chains need guide replacements and chain replacements too. Very simple to do. Getting the timing right is a fiddly thing but it is worth redoing it a number of times until you get it dead right. Took me a good week but the car is back to her glory. Don't forget to change the oil recovery module on the rear of the inlet manifold/head area, as these fail in both BMW's and Range Rovers alike and ruin idle and cause stalling because of air leaking into the inlet chambers. Well over 250,000 Km now and still beautifully quiet.. Was going to sell her but she is such a good car, I love driving her now. Might see me out.
 

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2002-2005 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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Wow, a lot of work there, Eric, but you did it all and you did it right....and now the squirrel exercise wheel under the hood is almost good as new. Nice to hear it all worked out well, and what problem areas others should look out for. Good stuff! The ol' bird from Solihull has a new lease on life.
 

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2004 4.4 V8 Vogue in Silver.
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16 Posts
Discussion Starter #30
Wow, that is quite some work you have done there! I have started off with all the little jobs - it's really cold out at the moment with an evil wind blowing so a couple of jobs will have to wait for the right day. I need to do my rear discs and pads - should be fairly straightforward. I then need to do engine, diff and transfer box oil changes. My car has only done 113000 miles and it looks like it has been well looked after in that time. My engine is really smooth and quiet with no nasty start up noises so any precautionary stuff I do can wait until the summer. I don't think I will attempt the vanos fix until I need to - I had a Jag 4.2 that rattled at start up but in the 2 years I owned it the noise never got worse and performance didn't seem to be affected. Mind you, if I have to go in to do the lower chain guide, I might do the lot while I am there. Thanks for your excellent detailed response.
 
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