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1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
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Discussion Starter #1
Hey Everyone - had a question, see if maybe anyone has seen this before or can help me get to where I should look.

1995 LWB, when on highway or above 30mph, car pulls to left when braking. The truck has new pads/discs all around, still tons of life on it. It has upgraded Stainless steel brake lines so no hose issues... truck even has a relatively new brake pipe from front to rear (driver side) that was replaced not too long ago.

I replaced both the front right and rear ABS sensors this past summer, no lights on the dash.

The truck has been pulling to the left since before the sensor replacement.

I pulled the rear wheels off last weekend when changing out the axle shafts, and I took off the FR wheel this am, and there isn't any signs of abnormality All wheels lock up when attempting the "stand on brake and try to move wheel while off ground" test

I have not noticed the accumulator running abnormally or pump running abnormally. Could I just be in need of a bleed or flush?
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover Classic
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binding caliper comes to mind, replace or overhaul, you mention new SS lines thus "no hose issues". did you replace the hoses as well or just the lines? if the hoses were not replaced I would suggest replacing them.

even if it has low mileage the truck is 23 years old, if fluids have not been serviced regularly, your brake fluid is wreaking havoc to its components from inside out. due to its hygroscopic nature brake fluid gathers moisture thus rots due to rust components from inside out.
fresh brake fluid and replace / overhaul components as need arises, for the time being LF caliper.
 

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1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
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Discussion Starter #3
fluid was done when I overhauled all the brakes. Let me check my records and see when the hoses were done. I am pretty sure back when I was paying a guy to maintain this truck lol I paid for it to be done. fluid is not too old. Because about a year or so ago, I had to replace the front to rear brake pipe due to rust, and the thing emptying out on the street... =/

so you think Left Front? Its pulling to the Left, wouldn't that imply that the Right Front would be weak braking?
 

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1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
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Probably a silly question, but have you checked the RIGHT hub to see if oil is leaking onto the brake disk? Oil that side would tend to make braking less efficient so the vehicle will pull to the left
 

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1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
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Discussion Starter #5
thanks! thats a great thing to check.... I did not specifically look for oil or pull the disk/ hub, but.... when I pulled the wheel on that side today I cleaned the disk and parts pretty well with brake cleaner... did not see any oily residue... and when I went for a test drive I was able to replicate the pull on my street! ha
 

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1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
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My 95 pulls to the left when braking sometimes, but I know I need to rebuild the calipers on both sides. Only thing I haven’t done yet, but it’s too cold to work on it. Both front hubs have been rebuilt, brake lines replaced, just need to deal with those calipers...maybe this spring...


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1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
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Discussion Starter #7
My 95 pulls to the left when braking sometimes, but I know I need to rebuild the calipers on both sides. Only thing I haven’t done yet, but it’s too cold to work on it. Both front hubs have been rebuilt, brake lines replaced, just need to deal with those calipers...maybe this spring...


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thinking ill prob just do the same thing....
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover Classic
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fluid was done when I overhauled all the brakes. Let me check my records and see when the hoses were done. I am pretty sure back when I was paying a guy to maintain this truck lol I paid for it to be done. fluid is not too old. Because about a year or so ago, I had to replace the front to rear brake pipe due to rust, and the thing emptying out on the street... =/

so you think Left Front? Its pulling to the Left, wouldn't that imply that the Right Front would be weak braking?
well if you look at hydraulics, the system receives the pressure applied thru the brake pedal, all corners apply at an equalized pressure. the pedal released pressure, calipers move to rest.

once pressure is released, if a hose is blocked said hose will not release or if a caliper piston has failed and binded, it will not release pressure thus remain applied and consequentially "dragging" the wheel.
this drag is interpreted by the turning axis of the steering thus the steering pulls to the binding side.

to defend your theory, if there was no pressure being delivered to the right side then the normal griping of the breaking action will cause "brake steer" to the left.

in my experience, land rover calipers do not loan themselves to being overhauled, probably 80 percent of the ones I have attempted to overhaul, have failed shortly there after. I don't even install rebuilt units anymore, always new specially at todays low costs.
 

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1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
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Discussion Starter #9
Heres a few more wrinkles to add. Performed a "normal drive heat gun test" drove the truck around town normal driving... came back home... both front discs were around 200-220 def F, and the rears were 150-180deg F. That would imply that I do not have a stuck caliper. Stuck caliper would be like 400 deg F.

I then performed the bleed procedure as per the manual. After completion the abs pump ran for only 37 seconds, meaning its still in good shape. Still experiencing the brake steer to left.
 

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the front calipers have 4 pistons, could be just one of the pistons is binding. maybe one of the two hoses has a blockage on the left side.
another option would be low tire pressure or unequal tire pressure, thus upon breaking the weight transfer and momentum makes the front end wobbly.
worn suspension bushings will make axles sway thus giving the impression of brake steer, specially but not limited to radius arm bushings front or rear axle.
a small play on the steering box, steering ball joints or an improper steering damper can amplify during the braking weight transfer.

I had a bilstein damper on my classic, made my steering wheel feel heavy and no matter how I aligned the front end, there was a drift to the right.
I figured the issue by happenstance. when upgrading the steering bar, I removed the damper and it begun to stretch on the bench
I retrofited to factory damper to solve concern.

loose wheel bearings, loose swivel bearings (aka wheel bearing pre load and swivel pin preload).

any one or a combo will cause your concern but first, set your 4 tires on jack stands, set your trans and t case on neutral to eliminate gear drag, have an assistant stand on the brake pedal and release immediately.
then you turn the wheel by hand and judge the initial or continuos torque needed to turn each wheel. not fully scientific or foolproof
but a guidance.
a bit more scientific if you removed the the wheels, front axle drive caps and rear axles and use a fish scale hooked onto one of the wheel studs to start wheel rotation, the fish scale will measure the exact force needed to begin rotation and take note. repeat above brake test. compare notes...

visually check the pad wear patterns on each caliper, check for excessive brake dust on each wheel (tell tale of short hard breaking or component failure) and while at it compare rotor wear, cracking, heat spots and color.
on a binding caliper your rotors will be light brown rust due to overheat while a normal operating caliper, the rotor will be scaly rusty and normal dark coloring.
of course on a binding caliper the pads will be unevenly worn and thinner compared to the opposite normal non binding side.

worse case scenario, back to the local land rover specialty repair shop.
 

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1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
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Discussion Starter #11
95clwb thanks!! Very helpful....

After the bleed, all is well visually on the brakes. I have new suspension bushings, a new dampener (relocated to front) and new steering rods HD terrafirma. I doubt i have issues with water in the swivel balls because I am not currently throwing any lights for ABS (have found that's usually when that happens). None the less, i took my truck to a specialist whom i trust to have him check / and for shts and giggles re-align it.

We looked at it together (second pair of eyes REALLY help) and when jiggling the wheel found that my drop arm (pitman) has slop in the tie rod! This could be the culprit. I will check back in after alignment to confirm or deny!
 
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