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2000 P38a RR 4.6 HSE
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Just picked up my P38 about a week ago I figured the brakes needed to be replaced based on the pedal feel. I confirmed this by taking one tire off the front and found the brakes to be good, though to myself "old fluid?", then took one tire off the back and found dangerously little pad left on the wheel side but a decent amount on the axel side - not surprising or is it? Photos below... Should I be concerned with the wear pattern. I'd think the caliper piston would wear the inner/axel pad more because it gets pressed first? Am I thinking correctly? Is it weird for the pads to wear this way?

I've never seen brakes come out like this. I've replaced brakes about 8-9 times on my cars. Maybe I just haven't done enough brake jobs? There have been differences in the remaining pads but not this great of a difference. What do you think? Someone only replaced one pad per wheel? Bad Caliper? Nuts and Slides were free flowing and smooth but I removed the boots and re-greased them.

Ordered EBC 6000 Greenstuff - Didn't drive for a couple days waiting for the brakes to show up. Read about the flush procedure here and found a video on youtube etc...

I dove into it today and replaced the rears and did a full flush with 2 liters of DOT 4 - Front LH ran about .33 liters through, Front RH, ran about .5 liters through, Both rears were about .5 liters each. I think the whole system holds about 2 liters. Maybe a bit more.

I could have done more but the red ~ brown brake fluid cleared and bubbles disappeared with those amounts. I'll probably flush it again in 2 weeks just to ensure I got all the old fluid out. I'll use 3 liters next time. 1 liter for the fronts and 1 liter for each rear caliper.

The bleeding is best with two people if you're following Rave in my opinion, I think it would be even easier with a pressure tank - easy bleed system. Next time I will probably use an easy bleed/pressurized system. My helper was my girlfriend and not very happy about having to help :p I told her it builds character:cool: I'll probably be on the couch tonight.

RH axel side: 1 (needs to be replaced)

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RH wheel side: 2 (needs to be replaced)

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LH axel side: 3 (needs to be replaced soon)

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LH wheel side: 4 (Scary low in my opinion!!!!)

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From (1)left to (4)right in photo directly above is the same as 1-4 above.
Is this wear pattern normal? These were Land Rover OEM pads. Should I be concerned?

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From (1)left to (4)right in photo directly above is the same as 1-4 above.


The flush was super easy following the Rave. A bit more involved than I'm accustom to but easy enough.

Given the state of the rears I might replace the fronts even though they all have at least 5/16" ~ 8mm left, what do you think?
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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Looks as if there is some fluid/oil contamination on those pads unless its from your hands when removing. If the discs are ok (£56 for a pair of rears drilled and grooved so replacement is cheap and easy at least in the uk) and pistons move freely again a pair of purchase outright rather than exchange rear callipers recently set me back £60 uk then a pad change, which IMO is a must do now by the state of them, will probably suffice.
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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I would just check to make sure the pistons are free to move full distance. You checked those sliding pins with the boots so you have that covered. I can't think of anything else that would lead to uneven wear. For my 99 I purchased a full set of discs and pads from Rock Auto for about $325.Good feel to the brakes and much better than when I purchased it.
(I see the site shows me in Mexico. Only here for a couple weeks)
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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+1 on the slider pins. They need replacing every couple of years imho. Need to run nice and freely or you will get uneven wear on the pads. I have tried polishing them with emery paper then assembling with coppaslip but just changing them periodically is the best bet. I am currently using silicone grease on them as a trial along with the ABS sensors. Seems to work better.
I also use Mintex pads. They work fine.
 

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If the calipers are gummed up, this can cause the pistons to not retract very far as Gordo suggests. Its been a few years since I did mine but I think Atlantic British has caliper gaskets if you end up needing to rebuild yours. But since you just flushed the fluid, you could wait and see how it wears after running for awhile. Gummy calipers leading to thin pads are usually noisy, since the pad is rubbing on the rotor without any pressure behind it. Brake fluid flush is a commonly over looked piece of maintenance, you might be the first person to do it.
 

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The bleeding is best with two people if you're following Rave in my opinion, I think it would be even easier with a pressure tank - easy bleed system. Next time I will probably use an easy bleed/pressurized system. My helper was my girlfriend and not very happy about having to help :p I told her it builds character:cool: I'll probably be on the couch tonight.
Easy-bleed works for initial fill of the system from empty (I did this after replacing rear steel pipes with new kunifer brake lines), but NOT for bleeding the system. There is no substitute for the two person procedure that actually works properly. This is because pressurising fluid via the reservoir cap is not the same as the pedal presses, plus pump on-off sequences.
 

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2000 P38a RR 4.6 HSE
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Discussion Starter #8
Easy-bleed works for initial fill of the system from empty (I did this after replacing rear steel pipes with new kunifer brake lines), but NOT for bleeding the system. There is no substitute for the two person procedure that actually works properly. This is because pressurising fluid via the reservoir cap is not the same as the pedal presses, plus pump on-off sequences.
Thanks for the heads up pwood I'll have to call a buddy to help in a few weeks.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I would just check to make sure the pistons are free to move full distance. You checked those sliding pins with the boots so you have that covered. I can't think of anything else that would lead to uneven wear. For my 99 I purchased a full set of discs and pads from Rock Auto for about $325.Good feel to the brakes and much better than when I purchased it.
(I see the site shows me in Mexico. Only here for a couple weeks)
I'll take the drivers rear tire off and check the piston more throughly in a few days, I inspected it when I replaced the pads but I didn't run it through the full range of motion, the gasket appeared in good shape and the piston pressed back into the caliper easily enough. The breaks feel great and much better after the fluid change. The fluid that came out was red/brown and had a slightly sweet smell. I don't know if you have ever smelled burning brake fluid but it had that smell.

Thanks for the input from all of you. I'll probably run the brakes for a few hundred miles and check the wear if the gasket inspection turns up nothing. I haven't noticed any noise since I replaced the pads but it could be the gummy gasket. I'll let you know what I find this weekend.
 

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2000 P38a RR 4.6 HSE
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Discussion Starter #10
Looks as if there is some fluid/oil contamination on those pads unless its from your hands when removing. If the discs are ok (£56 for a pair of rears drilled and grooved so replacement is cheap and easy at least in the uk) and pistons move freely again a pair of purchase outright rather than exchange rear callipers recently set me back £60 uk then a pad change, which IMO is a must do now by the state of them, will probably suffice.
I had grease and oil on my hands when I was arranging them for the photos.
 

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Depending on what pads you buy, they might have Inner & Outer markings. It can make a different to wear and/or squealing.

In general the pad wear will always be slightly different on floating calipers, but should only be 2-3mm. Yours were excessively worn and should have been changed long ago.
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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Look out for your brake hoses. There are a set to replace in the rear (qty 4 iirc, two for frame to axle, and two for the calipers) and often contribute to "strange" rear brake wear issues. Never done a dissection, but I'm guessing the inner hose liner fails and restricts flow in a rather random way. (restricting flow sometimes to and sometimes from the calipers). Just keep this in mind if your hoses are old. It was a long and frustrating troubleshoot for me the first time this happened. Once I learned what symptoms to look for, I found it to be a common issue on both my P38's. One indicator is when bleeding the rears on the pump, the flow should be "good". If weak or irregular, then suspect your hoses.
 
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