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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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Discussion Starter #1
I didn't have any braking problems but I decided the rear brake pads on my 2000 DSE were due for renewal.
The old pads were quite thin so I had to clamp the pistons to get them back in the calipers. Checked the brake fluid and it had come up in the reservoir as expected. Fitted the new pads and pumped the brakes to take up the slack in the pistons. So far so good.

I decided to test the ABS system while I was at it, based on comments I had read on this forum:-

Ignition off, I pumped the brakes 30 odd times to exhaust the accumulator - some resistance but I could push the pedal straight down to the floor! Switched on the ignition and the booster pump ran for 30 - 40 secs. Pump sounded good.
Pumped the brakes again and the pedal pressure was there but felt a bit spongy - as expected I think after fitting new pads and before they bed in.
Found the booster pump cuts in for a few seconds after every other pedal press. Press really hard on the pedal and there is a faint high pitched whine or hissing noise - is this a pressure relief valve in the pump or somewhere else in the system?
Strange thing is the brake fluid had dropped causing the low level alarm to come on.
Where has the fluid gone?. No leaks. I have not bled the system. Are these things normal?

Dave
:?
 

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Make sure to check the fluid after the acumulator charges for the first time. It should vary considerably.

N.
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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1,439 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Update.
Found out why the brake fluid level had dropped. Rear brake pipe over the chassis between the rear wheels corroded badly and leaking.

:(
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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Discussion Starter #4
Ok. Final update on my brake problems - caused by a burst pipe over the rear chassis!
All I can say is thank god it went in the drive while I was stamping on the pedal after fitting new pads and not out on the road.
The problem is the visible parts of the brake pipes looked to be in good condition yet the pipe over the chassis can't be checked that easily.

I have now just finished replacing the rear brake pipes with corrosion proof copper/nickle pipes (from Automec in UK) and I have also fitted Goodridge stainless steel braided hoses. Sod of a job but a few observations having just done it :-

It is not necessary to drop the fuel tank. The brake pipe can be threaded through between the chassis and the body. Because the pipe can't be clipped back into position without dropping the tank, I wrapped it in a plastic spiral cable sheath to stop it chaffing over the chassis and used a couple of stainless P clamps to secure it at each end. If you make the pipe 172 cms over the chassis to the LHR you can use a pipe coupler in the space at the front of the RHR wheel arch by the fuel filler pipes. There is just enough space. It makes the job a lot easier. Other pipes are 222 cms x 2 down the length of the chassis and 80 cms x 2 from ports 21 and 22 on the brake booster. There are two existing factory fitted steel couplers on these. I replaced them with brass fittings. All are 10mm thread. Used 3 litres of brake fluid.
Also do not throw away any of the brake brackets when doing brake jobs. They are no longer available from LR.

Dave
/:(
 
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