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Discussion Starter #1
So I changed my brake pads on my 2017 TD6. I had problems with the right rear caliper not wanting to depress. So I ended up takes the whole thing apart and when I did this is drained all the brake fluid out the system. So I rebuilt the caliper and put it back on and filled it up with dot 4 recommended fluid. Then I went and bled all 4 wheels got all the air out then redid them and the front two are perfect they didn’t even need to be bled. But the rear two had air in them again. I finally got the back left bled but the rear right still won’t bleed fully. It works with no bubbles for about 5 seconds then the Bubbles comes but it’s only on the right rear. So after of going thru a bottle of brake fluid on one right rear. I put it all back to together when to go start the car and it’s still feels spongy. I actually drove it and it works but it’s not at the same pedal position it was before. It bites maybe the last 15-20% of the pedal vs before when it bites at the last 50-60% of the pedal. I also made sure when bleeding the fluid didn’t go under minimum and after I was done I refilled it to max. But still spongy feel in brakes. If I press the brake pedal like 3-4 times cars the feel returns. And get hard but wait 3 seconds and push the pedal again and it’s just straight to the floors basically.
What do you all think? It has 30k miles on it. Obviously something is wrong what do you think, I should do?
 

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If there are still bubbles coming out you still have air in the system. Or you're doing something wrong and drawing air in while attempting to bleed. Since you pulled it all apart and let fluid drain out, it is also plausible air made its way to the cylinder which will also need to be bled. Or there is just air trapped deep in the lines. Put a pressure bleeder on it and bleed everything according the the service manual as there is a correct sequence. Did you also fit new rotors? If so did you prep them? Usually it takes a bit of time to break in new rotors,.If poorly prepped the brakes don't work very well until all the contamination burns off.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
If there are still bubbles coming out you still have air in the system. Or you're doing something wrong and drawing air in while attempting to bleed. Since you pulled it all apart and let fluid drain out, it is also plausible air made its way to the cylinder which will also need to be bled. Or there is just air trapped deep in the lines. Put a pressure bleeder on it and bleed everything according the the service manual as there is a correct sequence. Did you also fit new rotors? If so did you prep them? Usually it takes a bit of time to break in new rotors,.If poorly prepped the brakes don't work very well until all the contamination burns off.
No, rotors were acceptable so I just changed the pads and sensors. I read somewhere these cars need to be bled sometimes 2-3 times is that right?
 

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No, rotors were acceptable so I just changed the pads and sensors. I read somewhere these cars need to be bled sometimes 2-3 times is that right?
If you're bleeding the brakes using the pedal pumping method that is pretty time consuming and inefficient. I use a pressure bleeder which essentially pressurizes the system while simultaneously topping off the reservoir. leaves you to just go around the car to bleed everything quick and thoroughly. I'd look at your cylinder though, if most of the fluid drained out, that'd have most likely drawn up some air. Even if you do get the rear caliper to flow without bubbles air in the cylinder will render the whole system spongy. I'd bleed everything and then take it from there.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
If you're bleeding the brakes using the pedal pumping method that is pretty time consuming and inefficient. I use a pressure bleeder which essentially pressurizes the system while simultaneously topping off the reservoir. leaves you to just go around the car to bleed everything quick and thoroughly. I'd look at your cylinder though, if most of the fluid drained out, that'd have most likely drawn up some air. Even if you do get the rear caliper to flow without bubbles air in the cylinder will render the whole system spongy. I'd bleed everything and then take it from there.
How do I bleed master cylinder I bought the service manual but it shows me two bleed screws on a bleed block, that is not on my car under the hood.
 

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How do I bleed master cylinder I bought the service manual but it shows me two bleed screws on a bleed block, that is not on my car under the hood.
Bleeding the cylinder is a little different than the calipers... you want to either take those two bleed screws and run hoses from that back into the cap and pump away recirculating the fluids while purging the air away. Air also may be trapped in the ABS which is why pressure bleeding is ideal... Usually you start with the wheel furthest away. The pump method is rough when the system is entirely drained.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Bleeding the cylinder is a little different than the calipers... you want to either take those two bleed screws and run hoses from that back into the cap and pump away recirculating the fluids while purging the air away. Air also may be trapped in the ABS which is why pressure bleeding is ideal... Usually you start with the wheel furthest away. The pump method is rough when the system is entirely drained.
Alright, now which two bleed screws for the master cylinder? I couldn’t find it under the hood, there’s no bleed block on my car, Where it says it’s supposed to be in the manual. So I have to take the tank out, or is the bleed block in another location?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
If I get a autel md808p scanner can I get this car working? I need to most likely bleed the abs with the Scanner correct?
 

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Have you tried to bleed with the vehicle on? Are you using a pressurized bleeding tool with canisters or old school?

Disclaimer:
I haven’t had to bleed the brakes on a rover but when I installed my R1 concepts bike brake kit on my Raptor I had to do the final bleed with the truck on to bleed the abs. That did it for me.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Have you tried to bleed with the vehicle on? Are you using a pressurized bleeding tool with canisters or old school?

Disclaimer:
I haven’t had to bleed the brakes on a rover but when I installed my R1 concepts bike brake kit on my Raptor I had to do the final bleed with the truck on to bleed the abs. That did it for me.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Yes it should be done with the vehicle running... there should be two bleed screws, they may be occupied and you'll have to install bleed screws. Also the autel won't do any of the bleeding for you, you've got to do that manually. If you let the system run dry this is most likely your problem though. In the future never let it run dry, if you're going to pull a caliper make sure to cap off the hose so it's not dripping drawing up air. If you're changing fluid a pressure bleeder with new fluid and just go to each wheel and bleed until new fluid begins to flow.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Y
Have you tried to bleed with the vehicle on? Are you using a pressurized bleeding tool with canisters or old school?

Disclaimer:
I haven’t had to bleed the brakes on a rover but when I installed my R1 concepts bike brake kit on my Raptor I had to do the final bleed with the truck on to bleed the abs. That did it for me.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
I did it two times with car off. Got nothing I did it one time with the car on and I do see a tiny improvement. And this time the actual air got out of both rears which I couldn’t get 100%. Just drove it. Gonna jack it up and do the rears again. I saw in the service manual it says if it was drained it need to be bled with a scanner.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Y
I did it two times with car off. Got nothing I did it one time with the car on and I do see a tiny improvement. And this time the actual air got out of both rears which I couldn’t get 100%. Just drove it. Gonna jack it up and do the rears again. I saw in the service manual it says if it was drained it need to be bled with a scanner.
Yes it should be done with the vehicle running... there should be two bleed screws, they may be occupied and you'll have to install bleed screws. Also the autel won't do any of the bleeding for you, you've got to do that manually. If you let the system run dry this is most likely your problem though. In the future never let it run dry, if you're going to pull a caliper make sure to cap off the hose so it's not dripping drawing up air. If you're changing fluid a pressure bleeder with new fluid and just go to each wheel and bleed until new fluid begins to flow.
Also still confused about the master cylinder. I have no idea how to do it. There’s no bleed screws, doesn’t show it in manual either. Can I bleed M/C with scanner?
 

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Also still confused about the master cylinder. I have no idea how to do it. There’s no bleed screws, doesn’t show it in manual either. Can I bleed M/C with scanner?
This is beyond silly now.....


Here you go:
  • Purchase a power bleeder and 4 large bottles of dot 4 brake fluid
  • Get all four wheels up and off
  • Pressurize the system with the power bleeder (20-30 Psi), and press the start/stop button with your foot off the brake
  • Press the brake pedal and listen/feel for a slight buzz - this is the ABS pump cycling. You can repeat this step several times if you feel it is necessary
  • Start with the right rear wheel, and work you way toward the Master back to front
  • Open the bleed screws top to bottom/ far side to near on each caliper
  • Do not advance to the next caliper until there are no longer any air bubbles passing from and bleed screw - this may take a minute
  • Do not let the power bleeder run low on pressure or,low/out of fluid - should this happen start the process over
  • After all calipers run clear with fluid - check/adjust the fluid in the reservoir
  • Test the pedal
  • Drive the vehicle and seat the pads in with repetitive stops of increasing speed and pedal pressure - mind the brake temperature
  • Park the Rover for a a bit, have a soda and clean everything up - allowing the pads/rotors to cool
  • Go for a normal drive and enjoy your new rear pads
 

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Discussion Starter #14
This is beyond silly now.....


Here you go:
  • Purchase a power bleeder and 4 large bottles of dot 4 brake fluid
  • Get all four wheels up and off
  • Pressurize the system with the power bleeder (20-30 Psi), and press the start/stop button with your foot off the brake
  • Press the brake pedal and listen/feel for a slight buzz - this is the ABS pump cycling. You can repeat this step several times if you feel it is necessary
  • Start with the right rear wheel, and work you way toward the Master back to front
  • Open the bleed screws top to bottom/ far side to near on each caliper
  • Do not advance to the next caliper until there are no longer any air bubbles passing from and bleed screw - this may take a minute
  • Do not let the power bleeder run low on pressure or,low/out of fluid - should this happen start the process over
  • After all calipers run clear with fluid - check/adjust the fluid in the reservoir
  • Test the pedal
  • Drive the vehicle and seat the pads in with repetitive stops of increasing speed and pedal pressure - mind the brake temperature
  • Park the Rover for a a bit, have a soda and clean everything up - allowing the pads/rotors to cool
  • Go for a normal drive and enjoy your new rear pads
I appreciate it. Do all 4 wheels need to be up and off? I usually do it one wheel at a time then put the wheel back on, lower car, go to other side etc. since I don’t have car stands
 

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I appreciate it. Do all 4 wheels need to be up and off? I usually do it one wheel at a time then put the wheel back on, lower car, go to other side etc. since I don’t have car stands
It certainly makes it easier. I would not want to be bleeding brakes with the car on the ground and the wheels on. At this point, you should just limp the car to a professional and let them sort it.
 

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I appreciate it. Do all 4 wheels need to be up and off? I usually do it one wheel at a time then put the wheel back on, lower car, go to other side etc. since I don’t have car stands
As @brad s1 mentioned, it certainly makes it easier. Your should purchase a set of stands for your safety - I never trust a floor jack.
 

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As @brad s1 mentioned, it certainly makes it easier. Your should purchase a set of stands for your safety - I never trust a floor jack.
Also to add to that since you're new... For the love of god! before you go under the car make sure the air suspension is deactivated. You don't want to slide under there with the car resting on a jack or stand and have the suspension decide it is going to self level or compensate. It can knock itself off a jack stand very easily.
 

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by deactivated you mean "locked" via the button on the center console. Don't want to confuse young padawan ;):p
 

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Discussion Starter #19
by deactivated you mean "locked" via the button on the center console. Don't want to confuse young padawan ;):p
Also to add to that since you're new... For the love of god! before you go under the car make sure the air suspension is deactivated. You don't want to slide under there with the car resting on a jack or stand and have the suspension decide it is going to self level or compensate. It can knock itself off a jack stand very easily.
Yes already know this. I just didn’t know how to bleed the abs system I’m good now. I purchased a power bleeder. Should be here in a couple of days and this should be done
 

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by deactivated you mean "locked" via the button on the center console. Don't want to confuse young padawan ;):p
No I mean completely disable whether you leave a door/hood open, or ideally pull the fuse/power etc etc. If you begin jacking on the car with the suspension still active it will compensate possibly knocking itself off the jack. Or... if it is on a stand for a duration it may attempt to self level and knock itself off. Of course it's supposed to sense these things and not try to kill you, but it happens. Most recently I had mine in for inspection, asked the inspector if he had to lift it, to which he said "yes to check the suspension" I explain to him in detail how to do that to which is basically shrugged off. Then I watched him ignore everything I had said, he jacked it directly on the lower control arm and the suspension knocked the car off the jack and almost pancaked his head.
 
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