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Discussion Starter #1
(1995 Range Rover P38A)

My name is Jeremy and havent been on this site very long. Ive really been thinking alot lately about lifting, but I really dont want to mess with the suspension yet (I like the air). I have gotten tired of my 265/70-16s, and being as I work at a tire shop, I have access to some good stuff for cheap. We just had a customer switch to 35s on his 4runner, and left 4 285/75-16s with REALLY good tread with us. I would love to be able to put these on my truck. Ive been doing some research on here (very good resource) but it doesnt get me exactly where I want to be.

From what I understand, I can use a Classic body lift kit and slightly modify it, but I wanted to bounce some other ideas off of you guys. I am planning to cut the frame horns, front and rear, and weld them 2" higher to lose my bumper gaps. I assume I will have to weld in a piece in the steering shaft. For the radiator, it appears to be bolted to the frame anyway, so it shouldnt need much modification at all (i dont think it would go up with the core support). I understand the transmission and case run off cables, so that shouldnt be an issue either.

Just wondering what you guys think and if you have any suggestions or ideas. I would really love to hear from someone who has done it, but I understand those people are few and far between. I really appreciate the help.
 

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You'd probably want to look at getting the gearing changed as well. I had that size on my Classic and acceleration was awful and motorway cruising wasn't the best either.
 

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Premium Member
2002-2005 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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I've been considering this for ahwile now too, but I really don't know what to expect. The good thing is that it's relatively easy to unbolt a body and lift it up to see what binds. I was planning on doing a redneck body lift to mine. You take those boat trailer rollers, cut em in half, and there you go. Less than $50 bucks and you've got a way to see if it'll fly or not.

IIRC, there was a guy in Iceland running 35's, and he had a big body lift on.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
it just seems like a good idea...all the things that are issues for other vehicles dont seem to be present here. I was looking at what I would have to do to the radiator, but it doesnt look to be bolted to the core support - it is bolted to the frame, so it will stay inside its shroud and infront of the fan. I dont see any seat/seat belt brackets like many people talk about with a Range Rover Classic. Im just worried about the steering shaft and the bumpers.
 

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Premium Member
2002-2005 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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3,622 Posts
Only one way to find out.

Hell, if you want to do a 1" BL, I've heard of guys using hockey pucks (they can be had for 99 cents each). Only heard of one actually failing.

I say you have a homework assignment for RR.net. Your pics and write up are due on 9/1/09. Get to work. :thumb:
 

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I've never been a fan of body lifts, the only thing they get you is tire-clearance and raise the center of gravity. Just trim the fenders...

Look at the hard-core offroad rigs, suspension mods for ground clearance/flex and trimmed fenders for body clearance. Some guys cut/modify the rocker pannels for better ground clearance there
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Actually, a body lift maintains almost the same center of gravity whereas a suspension lift actually raises it. Also, I am not going to trim the fenders on my Range Rover - it cost me too much to hack the body on it. However, I may consider trimming the plastic rocker covers.

I may see if I can get some aluminum rod machined to fit my application. Does anyone see a problem with this? Speak now or forever hold your peace. :D
 

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I'll chime in. When I took possession of my Rangie, it was castrated by the previous owner. I still have all the components (minus the airbags) installed in the rig. I put in 1 in aluminum spacers under the coils and changed the shocks. I went with the Billistens, if I remember correctly, I ordered two sets of front shocks. Put all the goodies in and ordered some new tires. I went with the Nitto Terra Grapplers 285/65/18's. I had a little rubbing in the beginning and had to remove the front mud-flaps. Ride quality is better over rough terrain, especially neighborhood curbs, than the stock 255/55/18's. The tires fill the wheel-wells and look great. Acceleration is not there, but she will still get up and go. I can cruise on the interstate at 80 MPH comfortably or take her down the trail. My spedo, milage and mpg is off 8%. The tires are relatively quiet for their size and tread pattern. If I had to do it again...I would go with two sets of tires and wheels. Winter / Off-Road set-16 inch black steel NATO style wheels with the oversized Terra Grapplers and Summer / Highway- 18 inch 265/60/18's with a slightly less aggressive AT tire. There is big a difference in vehicle height. My two little boys could easily climb in the back with the stock setup, but not now i have to lift them into their seats. There's my 2 cents worth. Everyone can give me a hard time about not riding on air and all that stuff.

charliet
 

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Premium Member
2002-2005 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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3,622 Posts
What exactly does this have to do with a body lift?

charliet said:
I'll chime in. When I took possession of my Rangie, it was castrated by the previous owner. I still have all the components (minus the airbags) installed in the rig. I put in 1 in aluminum spacers under the coils and changed the shocks. I went with the Billistens, if I remember correctly, I ordered two sets of front shocks. Put all the goodies in and ordered some new tires. I went with the Nitto Terra Grapplers 285/65/18's. I had a little rubbing in the beginning and had to remove the front mud-flaps. Ride quality is better over rough terrain, especially neighborhood curbs, than the stock 255/55/18's. The tires fill the wheel-wells and look great. Acceleration is not there, but she will still get up and go. I can cruise on the interstate at 80 MPH comfortably or take her down the trail. My spedo, milage and mpg is off 8%. The tires are relatively quiet for their size and tread pattern. If I had to do it again...I would go with two sets of tires and wheels. Winter / Off-Road set-16 inch black steel NATO style wheels with the oversized Terra Grapplers and Summer / Highway- 18 inch 265/60/18's with a slightly less aggressive AT tire. There is big a difference in vehicle height. My two little boys could easily climb in the back with the stock setup, but not now i have to lift them into their seats. There's my 2 cents worth. Everyone can give me a hard time about not riding on air and all that stuff.

charliet
 

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LEGACY VENDOR
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2,491 Posts
Any pics?
 

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I am having a happy internet moment. I finally got a pic posted!

Kmag...not being an experienced off-road person, mechanic or a long time Rover owner does not make me stupid. I have replaced an ABS Pump and relays, ball joints, shocks and spacers, track rod (short and long), drag link, valve cover gaskets, fuel filter, middle muffler, front axle seals, both front hubs and cv joints, heatercore o-rings and a bunch of minor stuff. Before the Rover, I never worked on ANY car, truck or SUV. I have owned my Rover for 13 months. I read this post and IT sounded like what I had done. There was no need to quote my entire post. You could have posted a reply with a correction not ridicule. This forum is for learning,sharing of ideas, thoughts and information. I mad a mistake. I researched body lift vs. suspension lift. I NOW know what's the difference. Witty banter is one thing...but your post did not sit well with me. I have worked very hard on my Rover and this Forum has enable me (and many others) the opportunity to service our own Rovers.

Ok, I'm finished. No hard feelings, just how I felt at the time.

charliet
 

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Premium Member
2002-2005 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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3,622 Posts
All better now?

I wasn't bashing man... the important thing is that now you and probably others know the difference between a body lift and a budget boost. (lift blocks)

cheers and beers.
 

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Good information to know! Next time I'm in FL you owe me a beer. :shock:


charliet
 

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JACK'S GRANDAD
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having been in the "offroad scene" for quite a few years now, here is my .02 on body lifts.
yes they are cheap, but like most cheap things, are not the correct way of doing it.
a body lift puts more strain on the body where it is supposed to mount to the frame. more distance = more leverage.
damage to the body can, and indeed does, result from fitting body lifts.
they can and often do affect other things that folks who like doing things on the cheap do not know about and address. minor things like fuel filler hoses, vacuum lines, brake lines and "minor" wiring :shock:
i have, against my advise, installed body lifts on rigs. after it is all said and done (correctly), they aren't much off a lift kit.
this is all from experience from someone who wheels quite hard, to say the least :thumb:
a much better approach would be to space the coils with an aluminum spacer and a check the shock travel. in my arena, we call it a budget boost. search for them and see how cost effective they are :clap: a budget boost is far more effective for suspension travel and ride quality, not to mention the "minor" pitfalls i listed above. i see no reaso nwhy they cannot be used on eas as well as coils. minor tweaking with free software would be all thats needed i think.
i sincerely hope no one found my reply offensive or insulting in any way :lol:
just my .02, for what its worth....

martin
 
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