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2011 & 2012 Range Rover Sport HSEs
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I can't remember if I learned about Blackstone Labs on here or elsewhere, but I am very pleased with both their service and end result analysis. See the attached .pdf for details, but I was prompted to give them a first try just before completing my 2012's 60k oil//fluids change. I had been doing the changes at every 5,000 miles, but will lengthen that interval based on the very positive lab report. I plan to do this again at around 75k for comparison.
Summary: "This silver Range Rover is in great shape at 60,000 total miles. ...an overall healthy engine. Feel free to try up to 7,500 miles next!"
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2010-2012 Range Rover Sport
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I use Blackstone in my vehicles. With full synthetic, it is safe to go 10k miles up to 15k miles.
 

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2006-2009 Range Rover Sport
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I use Blackstone in my vehicles. With full synthetic, it is safe to go 10k miles up to 15k miles.
I agree with this, and then some. When I was growing up in the '70s, the norm of changing conventional oil was 3,000 miles. Oil technology was different then. Engine tolerances were very different too. There was an implicit attitude or assumption that changing oil more frequently was better. Given the engineering of both the oil and the engines at that time, it was a valid assumption. Not so anymore.

Present-day, high-quality, fully synthetic oils have 2-stage life cycles. The first stage is a detergent cycle that lasts for about 2,000 miles. During that stage, the oil "scrubs" the wearing surfaces in the engine of existing deposits. These built-up deposits actually protect the engine from metal-on-metal friction and wear. During the second stage, additives in the oil rebuild these deposits through heat and pressure. These deposits remain in place until the next oil change and protect the engine from friction-induced wear in the interim.

There is an essential point to the detergent phase, however. Wear in the engine is actually higher during this phase of the cycle. Not hugely or detrimentally so, but it is higher on a per-mile basis until the second phase kicks in, and the bearing surfaces get replated. The take-away is that changing your oil frequently - say every 5,000 miles - is not a best practice. I'm not going to go so far as to say it's detrimental, but in a well-running engine, it is unnecessary, and there is no "value-add."

Doing an oil analysis each time you change your oil, or even ½ way between changes is good practice. Similar to docs checking your blood indicators during a physical, oil analysis can provide an early warning about emerging problems in your engine, like the presence of antifreeze, excess fuel, or accelerating rates of wear. If you know about them, the (problem) source can be addressed before causing a much bigger problem.

I don't do as much driving now, so I change my (own) oil every 12 months. I usually have around 10K+ on the oil. However, when I was driving 30,000+ miles per year, I was running the oil for 20,000 miles between changes. During that time, I did interim samples at 10 and 15K to monitor wear rates and the TBN value. TBN is a measure of lubricity and is available as an optional analysis from Blackstone for $5 (I think) upcharge. TBN is a key indicator of oil health, and I'd recommend including it in your next analysis. Diesel mechanics on long-haul engines use TBN as a primary indicator of when to change the oil. All of the other material measures serve as monitors of emerging problems.

In any case, I never received any concerning comments from Blackstone at the higher (20K) interval, and the TBN values always indicated I could run the oil for at least another 5,000 miles. I never did, though. I figured I had gotten more than enough value out of it at that point.

This same engine now has 200K on it. I still run it 10 to 15K per year and never have to add any make-up oil between changes. As far as I'm concerned, the "character" of this vehicle only improves by the year now, and I'm hoping/planning to get another ten years out of it.
 

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2007 Range Rover Sport SC L320
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I can't remember how many times I have changed my oil at 3k then 5k miles only to have the fluid coming out that still has the yellowish hue of fresh oil.

Intervals are definitely better with today's more efficient engines. We can spend our money on other things.
 

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2006-2009 Range Rover Sport
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841 Posts
My 09 Calls for Casrtol 10W30.
I put in Castrol synthetic and change it once a year. About 12 to 15,000 kms. It still drains slippery and still a bit light brown. Uses zero oil between changes. Now at over 200,000 kms.

BTW, I have never actually heard of an engine failing because of too old oil.. Pretty sure there is a lot of hype going on there.
 

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2006 Range Rover Sport 2016 Mercedes S550 4MATIC
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123 Posts
Well, it actually happened to me. A long time ago, I had a Mazda 626. I never changed the oil for a long time (a few years) after I bought it, second hand, until one day I couldn't start the car. It was towed for repair. The inside of the oil filter was melted. Surprisingly after they changed the oil and filter, they were able to start the car. :LOL:
 

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First time I have heard of that. My brother in law drove a VW beetle and never had the oil changed. Ended up in a shop for something unrelated and the mechanic pointed out this black blob on the dipstick. My brother in law thought that that cars just worked. Also have another friend who has never changed the oil on his 80"s corvette. Never caused any engine problems as far as I know.

PS; not sure that the oil was your problem either. The story kind of doesn't make sense unless the engine seized in which case I doubt that it would start afterward.

No oil is a different problem.
 

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2006 Range Rover Sport 2016 Mercedes S550 4MATIC
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I didn't follow up on what the real cause at that time -- I was not into fixing cars then. But the mechanic did show me the oil filter. Its insider was melt like ashes. It could be that the oil dried up/ ran out of engine oils. But I don't recall I saw any warning lights on the dashboard.
 

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2006 Range Rover Sport 2016 Mercedes S550 4MATIC
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123 Posts
First time I have heard of that. My brother in law drove a VW beetle and never had the oil changed. Ended up in a shop for something unrelated and the mechanic pointed out this black blob on the dipstick. My brother in law thought that that cars just worked. Also have another friend who has never changed the oil on his 80"s corvette. Never caused any engine problems as far as I know.

PS; not sure that the oil was your problem either. The story kind of doesn't make sense unless the engine seized in which case I doubt that it would start afterward.

No oil is a different problem.
I recently changed the oil for the front and rear differentials. It's the first time it's changed after 140k miles. The fluid came out like mud, thick and greyish black, lots of metals on the drain plugs. Still, the car was working. So, to some degree, I agree with you that as long as there is sufficient oil it could still function.

I suppose it's likely the problem of my Mazda 626 was that engine oil was not only bad, but it's also dried up.
 

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2006-2009 Range Rover Sport
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Sludge is the biggest problem / if the oil gets too old (or under other conditions like lots of short trips) the oil will eventually sludge up and if you block a critical oil passage you can starve critical engine part of lubrication that will lead to excess wear and eventually failure. Under ideal conditiOns a modern synth could last more than 20k miles - but the only way to know for sure is used oil analysis and tbn test. So for most of us 10k max is a good rule of thumb. Lots of short trips or very cold weather - maybe less than this ...... some oems are conservative and spec shorter intervals (drives dealer profits and reduces warranty claims perhaps) - others like bmw stretch it a bit to far in my opinion) .....
 
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