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Afraid not. I've heard it mentioned before but never seen one. I have a feeling it has something to do with the strange SAI system you got over there.
 

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Discussion Starter · #43 ·
Thanks guys. Those second from the top bell housing bolts are kicking my butt. Probably going to pull the motor mounts and lower engine a bit
 

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Multiple socket extensions and a couple of universal joints is the usual way but I agree, they can be a real pain.
 
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Yes there is a temp sensor on the bottom of the radiator. It measures the coolant temp returning to the engine. It's used to turn on the electric fans. A separate sensor is especially needed for variable speed fans.
 

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One more thing. You should pressure test the coolant system dry. It's much easier to find small leaks listening for the air hissing out, than looking for a drip. Although you need a quiet time to listen for the leaks.
 

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Yes there is a temp sensor on the bottom of the radiator. It measures the coolant temp returning to the engine. It's used to turn on the electric fans. A separate sensor is especially needed for variable speed fans.
Absolute crap. The electric fans are turned on in series (so they run slowly) by the HEVAC as they are there to cool the AC condenser. If the engine gets really hot, the engine ECU will bring them on in parallel so they run at high speed.

It's information like this that finds its way onto YouTube and facebook so leading people away from the real answers so they end up chasing their tail for months.
 

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Discussion Starter · #48 ·
I was suspicious of that answer since you said the UK versions don’t have this sensor, but of course they have the cooling fans.
 

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Regarding accessing the top bolts of the bellhousing, have you removed the central crossmember yet? If you do, the entire engine/transmission assembly drops enough to provide you easy access to the said bolts (If my memory is not so rusty). If you have not yet removed the crossmember, but plan to do so, be sure to remove the exhaust pipe assembly first. If not, the engine/transmission assembly will rest on top of it after removal of the crossmember and bend some exhaust attachment bolts, which you will then have to drill out and replace, which is additional work you can avoid by simply moving away the exhaust pipe first.
 

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Discussion Starter · #50 ·
Exhausts are disconnected at the downpipe to catalytic connection flange on both sides. Are you referring to the cross member that’s back behind the transmission pan?
 

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Easiest way (especially if coils are already off, is to lift engine slightly & remove the engine mounts. Then you can lower the engine to get easier access to bell housing. Leave the cross member in place unless you want to remove gearbox at same time.

Don't forget to make a torque converter holder & fit that first so it doesn't slide forward as you remove the lump !!
 

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Discussion Starter · #52 ·
Thanks, that sounds better. I'm planning on jamming a piece of wood or something in there to hold it. Tonight is the night the engine comes out, unless I can't get the bell housing bolts out. But one way or another, they are coming out. Next week, I have every evening (except Thanksgiving) free to work on reinstalling the new engine, plus I have all day Friday off to work on it. Should be no trouble.
 

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FYI, I found it easiest to jack up the car, and do all the bell housing bolts reachable from underneath, leaving the top two in place. Then lower car & install hoist, ready to remove mounts & do the two remaining bolts.

It's even easier if you remove the heads first, or at least the inlet manifold.
 

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Discussion Starter · #54 ·
Intake is out; heads are staying on (complete replacement engine going in, only changing over the intake manifolds). I like your idea though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #55 ·
Guys, a little advice please. Obviously on the old engine oil and coolant mixed. It appears this car has a separate oil cooler in the radiator stack. That cannot have coolant in the engine oil or it will wreck the replacement engine I’m installing. So what do I use to clean it? Some type of chemical or solvent?

My battery powered light ran out of charge last night. To pull the old engine, all that’s left is the two tricky bell housing bolts and that oil cooler line. Lower motor mount bolts are removed; torque converter bolts are removed (they are very small!) everything is disconnected from the engine.
 

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Very good point, you need to flush it with something. As you are changing the oil in the new engine, you could probably use what you drain out of that. You'll need some sort of pump though.....
 
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Discussion Starter · #57 ·
I'm thinking of removing the cooler and lines, plug off the ends, fill with an engine degreaser, leave overnight, drain the next day, wash out with a hose and water, then use compressed air to dry everything internally.

I'm planning to do an oil change after the first hundred miles or so, which should help get any crud out.

What's the cooler right under the oil cooler...transmission cooler? I haven't studied the lines yet. On a positive note, I think I can get one of the tricky bell housing bolts from underneath with a socket and ratchet and extension.

By the way, should the transmission be supported some how when the engine is pulled? Or is it still solid because of being connected to the transfer case?

Thanks
 

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Transmission should be supported. I used a ratchet strap around the chassis rails & under the gearbox. That way it rises with the car when jacking to reach underneath, and you don't have to keep adjusting the support.
 

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Discussion Starter · #59 ·
Thanks. I'm probably going to go with the floor jack and block of wood method since I'll have two helpers.
 

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Discussion Starter · #60 ·
Any harm in using P-HOAT coolant instead of plain OAT coolant, which seems to be somewhat hard to get?
 
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