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Also update the thread as you go. Anything you find & resolve might help others in future.

Then when it's running, remove the suspension bodge & put the EAS back in as it should be. Somebody will probably buy the coils, etc from you.
 

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2002 Range Rover 4.6HSE
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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
Also update the thread as you go. Anything you find & resolve might help others in future.

Then when it's running, remove the suspension bodge & put the EAS back in as it should be. Somebody will probably buy the coils, etc from you.
Ha, no, I'll leave the coils in. My '97 had air, it functioned, but had so many problems and very little benefit. In off road mode, it was stiff as a board. Access mode is of no value to me. It would frequently level itself down to "all the way down" overnight and take forever to come back up. Sometimes one side would be down and one side up. I'm fine with the coils; its how the original Range Rovers were anyway.

I will update the thread. I'm super excited to have a Rover again. My Classic I spent a lot of money on modifying for off-road use; great vehicle.
 

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Ah, I forgot about the warranty aspect of the new engine. I rescind my suggestions and agree with the others: fluid changes and drop it in.
 

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Ha, no, I'll leave the coils in. My '97 had air, it functioned, but had so many problems and very little benefit. In off road mode, it was stiff as a board. Access mode is of no value to me. It would frequently level itself down to "all the way down" overnight and take forever to come back up. Sometimes one side would be down and one side up. I'm fine with the coils; its how the original Range Rovers were anyway.
But if you are putting the EAS back you can refurb the bits first so it won't do that, it'll just work. Being stiff was probably down to someone putting 'uprated' shocks on it when it needs soft ones. Original Range Rovers were on coils but as they got faster and more powerful they got a reputation for being unstable at speed due to the high centre of gravity which caused a few notable roll overs when people braked and swerved to avoid something in the road. The Classic was banned from being sold in some Scandinavian countries as it failed what they called the Elk test where swerving to avoid an Elk in the road caused it to roll over. That's why later Classics had EAS, to make them safer. Biggest problem with EAS is a lack of understanding and maintenance.

In 2001 I did an off road course at the Land Rover factory at Solihull. I did the course in a Discovery as that was what my employers had and they were paying for the course. I was astounded at what a Discovery was capable of, most drivers would chicken out long before they reached the limits of the vehicle. I asked one of the instructors which Land Rover product was best off road expecting to be told the Defender and was told the Range Rover on air suspension. He reckoned that if I thought the Discovery was good, I should see what a P38 was capable of. And that is completely bog standard, no lift, no big wheels, no uprated components, just exactly as they came out of the factory.

and yes, my 434k P38 is still on EAS which just works.
 

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That's a good point. The salvage yard did tell me to get a full refund would require me to remove the engine and ship it back to them on my expense. Alternately, they would give me a partial refund (did not specify the amount) and let me keep the engine.
I have two additional thoughts:
1. When you start taking things apart you can break them, for example, exhaust manifold bolts.
2. Not to discredit your mechanical skills but it is always possible to screw up. Valves bend so easily. Don't ask how I know 😥. Best luck with the engine. Let us know how it goes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
OK, so I just looked the vehicle over a bit more. Pull the dipstick and its a light brown milkshake with the oil level way higher than it should be, by probably 4 inches up the dipstick. So clearly coolant has migrated to the crankcase; presumably blown headgasket and / or shifted liner.

Open the overflow tank and it smells mostly like coolant; maybe a hint of gasoline. This engine will run enough to move the vehicle; it starts hard but I got it up on my trailer and back off from the seller 50 miles away. It is knocking and the oil pressure light is on along with check engine.

My question is, did (or does) engine oil get into the coolant system? Does the radiator and heater core need to be chemically flushed? Or does the cooling system just get pressurized with engine compression but no oil?

On a positive note, it looks as though the AC compressor can simply be set aside without removing the gas and opening the system. The hoses appear long enough, especially once the airbox is out of the way.
 

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Sounds like it has a liner problem, coolant passages are at each end of the heads so it would need to be a blow from one of the end cylinders for coolant to get into the oil. You will get coolant in teh oil rather than the other way round, you might see an oily film in the header tank but that is about all. Definitely sounds like that engine is scrap though. Reverse flushing the radiator and heater matrix with a hosepipe would be a good idea while you are doing it.

AC compressor and power steering pump hoses are long enough to just move them to one side. With the fan off and the radiator out, you have plenty of room to remove the engine. It's worth taking the upper intake manifold and ignition coils off too. If nothing else it gives you easy access to the top two bellhousing bolts. On a RHD car the rear bolt on the RH exhaust manifold is a real pain to get to unless you take out the inner wheelarch liner so I would assume the same on the LH manifold on a LHD car. With both inner wheelarch liners out you will have plenty of access to the manifold bolts and starter motor too. Hopefully your replacement engine is complete with the engine wiring loom, which makes it almost plug and play. Make sure you undo the flex plate bolts (through the holes conveniently provided in the flywheel cover) and leave the torque converter in place on the gearbox rather than coming out with the engine. A lump of wood shoved in the inspection hole on the bottom of the bellhousing will stop it slipping off its splines.
 
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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
Yes, I will flush the radiator and heater core with water from my garden hose once the engine is out / rad is out. The new engine does not have a wiring harness, a starter, or any intake manifold so those items will all have to be swapped over. It does have a water pump, which I will check for play and replace if necessary.

I have ordered all the parts I think I will need:

-Engine valley gasket for lower intake manifold
-Both engine valley end pieces
-Upper intake manifold gasket
-Intake manifold heater gasket
-Intake elbow gasket
-Exhaust manifold gaskets
-Manifold to catalytic converter pipe gaskets
-Heater pipe o-ring

-Valve cover and oil sump gaskets since I intend to remove these and perform a basic engine inspection before install
-8x Bosch double platinum spark plugs (wires are already close to new on junk engine)
-Engine air filter
-Engine oil filter

I have made a fan clutch nut tool from a piece of flat steel with 36mm cut out flats and a bar to stop against the nuts. The serpentine belt looks to be in good condition with no cracks. The power steering pump is wet, but I believe it is the fittings / hoses leaking. I'll solve that problem now as well.

Once the intake manifold and engine harness is removed, I'll work on the exhaust. My plan is to simply unbolt the downpipes on each side, leaving the manifold bolted to each side of the engine and remove it once the engine is out. I can take out the fender liner if necessary; on the left hand side it does look like the steering shaft and power brake assembly clutters that area.

I was aware of removing the inspection cover under the bellhousing and removing the torque converter bolts. Are there 4? And yes, shove the torque converter backwards towards the transmission to keep it in situ while the engine comes out.

I'll take some photos once I get underway. Project will start tomorrow evening since it is supposed to be raining hard and I can't do my outdoor work, but it will probably stall out until Wednesday at least of next week. After that I'll be working on it every night after work until its done. My goal for tomorrow is remove the hood, drain coolant, get the radiator / shroud / fan off, and intake manifold off.
 

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Sounds good. Last swap I did took a weekend with two of us but part of that was due to having to work under a tarp as it was pouring with rain all the time. No need to remove the bonnet (hood), there's a clip on each side which allows it to lift all the way up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #30 ·
Good to know on the hood. Another question - are the exhaust manifold bolts generally reusable or should I be ordering more?
 

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Never had to replace any yet and that is on quite a number of different cars. Just reuse the ones you take out.
 
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Discussion Starter · #32 ·
One last question - with the battery removed, does a code still need to be entered into the radio once power is reconnected? Because I don't have it. I know on my 1997 it did; the radio is different on this 2002 but I'm assuming yes.
 

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Yes it will, so without the code you are stuffed. I changed my engine without disconnecting the battery (otherwise how would I be able to lock it?). Carefully disconnect the starter and alternator cables, wrap them in tape or shove a piece of random rubber hose over the ends and tuck them away somewhere.
 
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Discussion Starter · #34 ·
Thanks, I'll leave the battery in. It needs to be charged as it is, and is the wrong size although nearly new. Only 700CCA; I read these should be 900CCA+. At least they have a 150A alternator. When I swap the battery, I'll use a jump pack with the leads connected as I remove them from the old battery until I connect them to the new.
 

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Discussion Starter · #35 ·
The "new" engine will arrive on Monday. Can't wait to have a look. If the bad engine will start up and run again (for the last time), I'll pull it inside the shop later and get to work. Otherwise, I'll tow it in with my Polaris ATV.
 

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Discussion Starter · #36 ·
Got the vehicle to run and in the shop. So far, stripped everything down to the lower intake. Looks like the fuel rails and injectors would have to be removed in order to get a clear shot with a ratchet; maybe they will come out with a universal swivel. The secondary air injection system is a big pain in the rear, just in the way. Terrible location for the ignition coils. Once the lower manifold is out, I’ll have to reinstall the accessory bracket to have the engine hook for pulling the engine out. Then, exhaust down pipes, bell housing bolts, torque converter bolts, starter, motor mounts.

Even the intake pipe to the airbox had coolant in it. The MAF will have to be cleaned at the very least.
 

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Discussion Starter · #37 ·
Vehicle Motor vehicle Automotive design Car Automotive exterior

Vehicle Car Gear shift Motor vehicle Speedometer

Quick update, didn't have much time to work on it. Lower manifold is out. One plug wire corroded into a coil. Because of how hard it is to access these, I'm ordering two new coils and a set of plug wires. "New" engine arrived today. Looks clean enough overall, but I see a slight smudge of grease emanating between one cylinder head and the block. I'm thinking I might as well replace the gaskets while the engine is out.

What about rear main seals? Do these leak on these engines? Below are some pics of my progress:
Tire Wheel Automotive parking light Car Land vehicle

Wheel Tire Automotive parking light Automotive side marker light Vehicle
 

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I was thinking it would be interesting to see what the underside of the valve lifters look like in comparison to what Alan Lindsay found in his engine. Could you post a photo or two? IIRC they should be shiny and smooth. Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #39 ·
Once the replacement engine is on the stand and I remove the valley gasket, I'll take some pics. Might be a couple of days before I can get to it again.
 

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Discussion Starter · #40 ·
By the way, there is an electrical sensor and plug installed right into the bottom of the radiator. What is that for? Coolant temp sensor is still up top in the manifold.
 
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