RangeRovers.net Forum banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
129 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Ok, so i've finally worked up the confidence to take the Range on a nice little trip, just 300ks or so each way.

I'm going to be passing by a few National Parks that have some 4wd trails, should be fun having a little bash around. But more importantly, i'm going to be passing by Stockton Beach. For those of you not in Australia, or not near Sydney, take a look here (google maps link).
Basically a massive stretch of sand and dunes, with a shipwreck a bit out to sea.

Now, i've never driven on sand (well.. deep sand) before, looking for some tips/advice.
- Airing down the tyres... pretty much have to do this right? Should I start at about 20psi or lower/higher?
- Low Range... Seeing as i'm not going to be going that fast anyway, should i stick the 'box into Low range and leave it there? Or does this suck up too much petrol/engine wear, and only be used to get myself out of soft sand.
- Anti-rust... Read about this on a few other forums. Should I be looking at getting some anti-rust solution sprayed onto the undercarriage? Or do i just get a hose and give the underside a good rinse afterwards. Should I avoid pointing the hose under the engine bay? How worried should I be about sand getting into wierd places?
- Ride height - Im thinking i'd lock it at the highest (manual) setting, or do I leave it at normal to keep the centre of gravity down a bit?

Anything else I should be worried about? Thanks guys
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
553 Posts
Fistly in sand you need momentum to keep you going not grunt.

1. Deflate your tires to 1bar and go down to lowest 0.8bar any lower than that and you risk running the tyre off it seat/bead
2.Keep your car in high range only use low range should you get stuck
3.Anti rust is a good idea if you are going to be constantly driving near the coast and on beaches, however a decent rinse off after you trip should get rid of most of the salt and grime
4. Ride height should not come into much effect unless you are going to be cresting a lot of dunes, if this is the case then have it set to maximum to reduse bottoming out

Remember to gently stop your vehicle when you want to stop no slamming the brakes, also gentle acceleration is advisable should you want to pull off without geting stuck.If you want to play it safe I would sudjest when you stop your vehicle you stop it facing donwards on a slight slope this will assist your take offs should the sand be very soft.

Any other questions ask me, I live in Namibia and we have some of the biggest dunes in the world
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
553 Posts
@ Tango just watched that video now it is insane! pitty the range didnt make it up the dune even though it was flying!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
468 Posts
Keep an eye on the temperature guage.
Keep speed below 80kmh in smooth flat areas
No hard cornering or donuts - you'll risk popping the tyre off the bead
 

·
Premium Member
2002-2005 Range Rover MkIII / L322
Joined
·
3,622 Posts
When I drove on the sand dunes in Silver Lake, MI, we would air down do 12-15psi and all was well. Here in FL, I like to keep it a little higher since there's always some mud around, and more of a chance of losing a bead....so I stay around 17-18 psi.
 

·
Registered
1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
Joined
·
336 Posts
H

My experience in very deep soft sand has been to let the tyres down to at least 15psi and in many situations as low as 10-12psi.

In my 89 and 95 RR's at 10 psi I could drive over any soft dry sand without difficulty. I could even stop on inclines and drive up the incline from a standing start. (low range 3rd).

The advice of stopping on a downward facing slope is good advice. Generally speaking though you can drive through almost any sand at 10-12psi. Be very aware of course that at these low pressures you can pop a bead more easily. Straight line driving at low psi is ok, the bead can easily pop though if you make fast sharp turns in the sand, so slower and wider turns are the way to go at low psi. In some situations you may even need to do a three point turn :) to make sure the bead stays on.

It is unlikely you will get stuck in very soft dry sand at these low pressures. If however you drive though deep ruts in wet sand you can get stuck because the chassis etc bottoms out on the wet sand. At low psi there is a greater chance of popping a bead in these "wet" or damp ruts as the wheel will follow the ruts. You will need momentum to get through such wet/damp ruts.

At 15 psi you should be able to drive almost anywhere and (keeping the above comments in mind) it's no harder than driving on tracks, just sometimes a little slower. The sand is usually a little firmer closer to the waters edge. It is easier to drive on and more economical. Keep out of the saltwater though! If you go too close to the waters edge sand can easily form deep ruts.

If you get stuck in such deep ruts, don't panic, just drive slowly back and forth to help compact the sand under the wheels until you have a long enough "compacted track" to allow you to pick up a little speed and MOMENTUM and you will be on your way again. You may find you have to do this frequently depending on your situation. In such cases it then becomes easier to get away from such sand and drive back in the soft stuff :)

If you seem to be REALLY stuck, don't be afraid to let the tyres down to even lower pressures. It is NOT the width of the tyre that helps you drive in soft sand! The lower pressures increase the LENGTH of the tread pressing down on the sand. Tyres that have higher sidewalls are much better than low profile road tyres.

Even as low as 3-5 psi in EMERGENCY situations (only) can get you out of trouble. I have seen a $100,000 Land Cruiser ruined by being buried underwater because the owner did not want to let his tyres down in case they were damaged!!!!

If you are faced with a situation where the vehicle is stuck at the waters edge and the tide is washing around the tyres, (depending on how deep the tyres are buried) the chances of driving out can be quite limited. It would be MUCH wiser and quicker to use a snatch strap before the tyres get really "sucked" in to the sand.

Make sure you and others have a snatch strap to help recover stuck vehicles, some times it may be the only or quickest way to get moving. Have a GOOD QUALITY air compressor with you. Don't skimp on the price! It's not much fun with a compressor that takes 20 minutes to pump up ONE tyre an then have to wait TEN minutes for it to cool down for the next tyre. Pumping up large tyres from 10-12 psi to even 26psi can take some compressors a long time.

HTH

Enjoy your drive...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
129 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Hi guys, thank you all for the advice!

Ill deflate to 15psi and start at that, if I run into problems i'll go further.

Unfortunately no other cars are going with me (only other '4wd' on the trip is an X6, so that's staying well away from anything other than tarmac), so i'll be staying well away from the waters edge for now. Stockton should be pretty well populated though, so it shouldn't be too hard to find someone to lend a hand if I get stuck (which would be entirely my fault, there is no other explanation for a Rangie getting stuck!)

Is it safe to drive on the road (slowly) at ~15psi? I've done it once with a punctured tyre (very smooth ride!) but i'm guessing its not that great for the tyres. The only air compressor I have at the moment is a cheapy thats about 10 years old. Good for pumping up soccer balls and the like, absolutely useless for anything else.
There should be a petrol station quite close to the beach there, or at least a place with an air pump, so i'm hoping that would do.
 

·
Registered
1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
Joined
·
336 Posts
Hi

mekadodo said:
Hi guys, thank you all for the advice!

Ill deflate to 15psi and start at that, if I run into problems i'll go further.
You should be ok for at least 90% of your driving :)

Unfortunately no other cars are going with me (only other '4wd' on the trip is an X6, so that's staying well away from anything other than tarmac),
Understandably so, it would probably be ok on the firm sand but anything too soft and it would probably find it tough going. Most of the time high range will be fine for most 4WD including the beemer, but you just never know. The Rangie could rescue the beemer quite easily but the X6 could not do the same for the RR.

so i'll be staying well away from the waters edge for now. Stockton should be pretty well populated though, so it shouldn't be too hard to find someone to lend a hand if I get stuck (which would be entirely my fault, there is no other explanation for a Rangie getting stuck!)
That would be correct :) :)

Is it safe to drive on the road (slowly) at ~15psi?
You can but it is not really a good idea if you can avoid it.

I've done it once with a punctured tyre (very smooth ride!) but i'm guessing its not that great for the tyres. The only air compressor I have at the moment is a cheapy thats about 10 years old. Good for pumping up soccer balls and the like, absolutely useless for anything else.
There should be a petrol station quite close to the beach there, or at least a place with an air pump, so i'm hoping that would do.
You really should invest in a good compressor. It's well worth the money, convenience and TIME.

I once surveyed a 4WD trip alone in my 89RR without any other vehicles. I implicitly trust my RR and it did not let me down in the softest sand I had ever been driving on. It was not really a good idea to do this alone and is frowned on by 4WD clubs including the club I was in. In your situation as you say there should be many helping hands IF you ever need them :)

good luck with your trip.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
232 Posts
all the above but,

I would avoid salt water like the plague, yes you can wash it off but any spray will totally ruin any exposed electrical connections. Also extended and unneccesary running at reduced tyre pressures will lead to excessive wear and perishing of the rubber. i.e. get them back up to pressure asap.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
129 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Thanks for all the tips guys. I didn't end up going to Stockton, but there were a few beaches right near where we were staying that had 4wd access. :D

I had a fun time trying to drive back off the beach though, as the entrance/exit was uphill, and had a sharp bend in it, so there was very limited run-up to it. Didn't help that the sand was so loose that the tracks i had made before had just disappeared.

Its a very interesting experience driving on sand, I had to get used to following the ruts, and trying to get out of the deeper ones if i wanted to go a different way `)

Quick pics... I forgot to take off the sun shade /:(


 

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
Hi,

I believe the guys have answered your quries already. I have done plenty of dune bashing in the past few years here in the middle east and lately I took my p38 for real desert challenge and everything went well
see link: http://www.rangerovers.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=37292


what I can advise you is the following depending on the sand & area:
1. psi: 15-18
2. I would recommend the extended mode, you will be driving slow anyway
3. High gear until you get stuck
4. be mindful of the sea water when it dries. the dry salt will be difficult to come off.
5. Ask yourself: do I have the right emergency gear and safety equipment on board?
6. enjoy it `)
 

·
Registered
1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
Joined
·
336 Posts
Hi

FWIW, looking at tyres in the photos the tyre pressure looks too high for soft sand. Passable for the photo location, but that may have been why you had "fun" trying to get off the beach?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,052 Posts
mekadodo said:
- Anti-rust... Read about this on a few other forums. Should I be looking at getting some anti-rust solution sprayed onto the undercarriage? Or do i just get a hose and give the underside a good rinse afterwards. Should I avoid pointing the hose under the engine bay? How worried should I be about sand getting into wierd places?
Take your rear bumper off. 8-0= :shock: :roll:
I did and needed more than 'anti rust'. :lol:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
129 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
Peter Sanders said:
Hi

FWIW, looking at tyres in the photos the tyre pressure looks too high for soft sand. Passable for the photo location, but that may have been why you had "fun" trying to get off the beach?
Quite right, they were probably ~22 psi each. My compressor isn't a big heavy duty thing, and I was being a bit lazy, not wanting to wait to pump them all back up. I was just about to let some more air out of the tyres, but a bit of good pedal-to-the-metal fun had the Rangie slithering off the beach.

Next time I go to the beach i'll have to invest in a heavy duty compressor.

q-rover said:
Take your rear bumper off. 8-0= :shock: :roll:
I did and needed more than 'anti rust'. :lol:
Haha you make me want to go down and take a peek right now. Perhaps next time I have a whole week off :D
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top