RangeRovers.net Forum banner

1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,806 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
My Interstate MTP-93 is in rather poor health. As such, I'm looking at what I should replace it with before I end up with a dead battery.

My options are:
Interstate MTP-93 for about $160
Optima yellow top D31A for a whopping $280
DieHard Marine Battery, Platinum PM-1 for $220

I have always avoided DieHard in the past, but I've seen a lot of complaints with the Optima... and the PM-1 has 1150 cold crank amps (at 0 degrees F) which is pretty impressive... and 205 minutes reserve capacity. Optima is only 900 cca.

I am thinking about trying the DieHard because it appears to be such a beast... it is group 31 so I assume it will fit since I see people are using the optima quite a bit. I also like that it is a sealed AGM type battery which in theory should never leak and take out my air suspension lines!

Anyone have any words of wisdom?
 

·
Registered
2006-2009 Range Rover MkIII / L322
Joined
·
196 Posts
I'm not familiar with any of those batterys ( wrong side of the pond and all) but I would be cautious of marine batterys as theas are deep cycle cells and not realy the right choice for a car.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,806 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
As I understand it, a deep cycle battery is the same, it just is able to survive a large amount of discharge which would normally ruin a regular car battery. If so, it seems like that would mean it is even *BETTER* suited to starting needs. No?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
There are two types commonly used a starting type battery which delivers a lot of current for a short period of time. These don't like being fully discharged. The second is the deep cycle or leisure type battery. These are designed for providing sustained current over a longer period. Commonly used for running ancilleries like fridges and lights or pumps; or for vehicle fitted winches.

There is a middle ground such as the Odyssey mentioned above which combine these properties. They can provide a starting current and deep cycle but are generally more expensive. In the UK optima has lost its crown as the ultimate battery, I'd go for the Odyssey one myself.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
468 Posts
Unless you specifically need deep cycling then go for the Interstate. Optima / Odyssey are overrated. For 90% of the population the standard battery will provide more than enough for everyday useage. I ran a Din92 (roughly the same spec battery) in my BMW for a couple of years and gave it a bit of abuse. Never failed me and still going strong.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
115 Posts
linuxfreakus said:
I might add that the DieHard is made by Odyssey and is the same as an Odyssey PC 2150
If that is true, confirm it and buy it. I have heard nothing but good things about the Odyssey batteries. I have had good luck with Optima's and have two in every truck except the 03. I did run a standard Red top Optima in the 03 for 6 months with out issue, when the original battery died. Although, I had to strap it down, as it did not fit properly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,806 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
The more I read, I too am convinced that the DieHard is the way to go. Optima seems like they were great a few years ago, but newer ones have had alarmingly high defect rates and difficulty in claiming warranty replacement. I think I will be heading over to Sears this afternoon to pick one up. I'll let you know how it goes (I refuse to let them touch my car, I'll be doing the replacement myself).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,806 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
umbertob said:
Die Hard Platinum only are made by Enersys. Cheaper than Odysseys, an even better warranty and virtually the same batteries. Too bad they don't have an exact match for my 2006 RRS OEM battery.
Interesting, looks like that is correct. Perhaps just the fact that the specs are identical is what convinced some people that they are made by Odyssey. Either way it is a monster of a battery.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,806 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Just picked up the battery... about 80 lbs. Wow. It is a monster. Somewhat taller than the old MTP-93, and I needed a longer earth lead in order to connect it, but other than that, it was a simple task and the starter sounds normal again and voltage staying up so far. (Old one needed a jump if left for more than two days).

Only snag was that, much to my horror, at some point the mtp-93 boiled over because there was acid in the battery tray (was not there two days ago) and it had also run down underneath and caused a bit of damage. Amazingly, there are air lines and also coolant lines running *directly* under the holes in the battery tray!! Crazy! I ran and got baking soda to neutralize it and cleaned up the mess. Luckily the air lines and coolant lines do not appear compromised but I am thinking of replacing the coolant hoses anyway since a failure could lead to bad stuff happening. Air lines would probably leave me on bump stops but I'm not as worried about those, I could splice in a new section if needed.

So I guess one or more cells inside the old battery must have gotten shorted. I tested the new battery and the charging voltage looks normal, and I can't detect any AC while the alternator is running, so I assume the alternator is functioning normally.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
183 Posts
Just to add a question in this topic to the more knowledgeable gentlemen (or women) in the forum. Would there be a problem if I use a DIN88 battery which, what I was told, has only 85 ampere hour on an L322 Range Rover? I ask this because I can't seem to find the required 90 to 100ah battery where I am. Having one shipped over would take over a month and my current battery was found to be weak after I had it checked. I am worried that if I don't use the required battery it may damage the alternator or the alternator charge may damage the battery since it is a 150amp unit. Thanks for any inputs! :pray:
 

·
Registered
2006-2009 Range Rover MkIII / L322
Joined
·
6 Posts
Resurrecting this thread, as I recently needed to replace the battery in my 2008 HSE and wanted something with more power and a higher CCA for winter starts in a cold climate.

I ended up going with an Odyssey 31-PC2150T, which is rated at 1150 CCAs, though it is very heavy and not a plug-and-play fit. Definitely doable for the average DIY'er, but you will need a few extra parts to make it work (linked below). After a few months use, it has been flawless; easy starts even after sitting for a couple weeks, no more random error messages in cold weather, and I can put on the heated seats, windshield, and steering wheel, wipers, high beams, etc. all at the same time without any noticeable drop in power.

I bought mine from amazon, and I was a little concerned given the weight, but it arrived in fine condition:
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B002498O2G/

To get it to fit properly, I bought this battery tray, but only needed to use the tie-down strap with the stock battery tray:
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00E3ALEKI

You will also need to replace the stock negative cable with a longer one, since the Odyssey is a little taller than the OEM battery. I used this one, which was a tight fit on the terminals, but ended up working fine:
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07D5PWG7Q

Also, I'd recommend putting down a small non-slip pad in between the stock metal tray and the bottom of the battery, to reduce the chance of rattles and for a little extra insurance to keep things in place. I just cut out a piece of this mat I had lying around the house:
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000OQTV2I

Highly recommended upgrade.
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top