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Premium Member
2002-2005 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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Discussion Starter #1
I've read about these gadgets on various sites and in classic car mags, but was wondering whether anyone here has used them on a RR or on any other car. I know the RR eats batteries, although I've never had a problem myself with excessive discharge.

As sulphate build up on the pates is generally what kills batteries in the end, the theory is that this magic box will extend the battery life indefinately - I like this idea. From reading other info, they can even revive failing batteries back to full health as long as they are not completely gone, so if you battery is only holding a charge for a week, this could be your answer rather than a new battery.

The only thought in the back of my mind is would the "pulse" fry everything else in the car!? Is 90 ampers a lot??

http://www.frost.co.uk/item_detail.asp?productID=9575&frostProductName=Battery Activator

Is there anything else we can do to prolong battery life? Is the stock batter under rated for an engine this size with this ammount of of equipment?

Thoughts?
 

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Premium Member
2010-2012 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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4,635 Posts
If you have a look at Microcat, it is obvious that LR made the same mistake as it did with the p38 when it came to batteries. Certain models were fitted with an underspec unit. From what I understand (without checking) the same battery goes in all models now, and that's the huge YGD000270 unit.

I think it's just a case of keeping an eye on the battery though Dan. Very often it is fine one day but not the next. I think the only way to monitor it is to use the electrical sticky information and test it with a multimeter every so often.
 

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1,119 Posts
Rich998a said:
If you have a look at Microcat, it is obvious that LR made the same mistake as it did with the p38 when it came to batteries. Certain models were fitted with an underspec unit. From what I understand (without checking) the same battery goes in all models now, and that's the huge YGD000270 unit.

I think it's just a case of keeping an eye on the battery though Dan. Very often it is fine one day but not the next. I think the only way to monitor it is to use the electrical sticky information and test it with a multimeter every so often.
You did not comment on the use of the "Pulse" gadget?
 

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SUPER MODERATOR
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27,725 Posts
As touchy and tempermental as the electronics in our rigs can be I would be leary about any such product. For ages dealers and shops used to sell little tubes of VX6 additive for your battery. The idea was the same, it kept the sulphites from building up. As with many additives and gadgets they work great for making money. They do little or anything for the consumer.

I'll stick with the maitenance idea that the battery is a wear item like brake pads and motor oil. When time comes for a replacement just stick in the biggest honker you can fit which is usually the battery for diesels.
 

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Premium Member
2010-2012 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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4,635 Posts
Gazellio said:
Rich998a said:
If you have a look at Microcat, it is obvious that LR made the same mistake as it did with the p38 when it came to batteries. Certain models were fitted with an underspec unit. From what I understand (without checking) the same battery goes in all models now, and that's the huge YGD000270 unit.

I think it's just a case of keeping an eye on the battery though Dan. Very often it is fine one day but not the next. I think the only way to monitor it is to use the electrical sticky information and test it with a multimeter every so often.
You did not comment on the use of the "Pulse" gadget?
Oh - Sorry - No comment... :hand:
 

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Premium Member
2002-2005 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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Discussion Starter #6
I thought its claims were more believable than "Wrap this magnet around your fuel pipe to increase your MPG and power" as it kind of makes sense. But I don't think I'm willing to be the guinea pig!
 

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LEGACY VENDOR
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1,108 Posts
The battery pulsing concepts are usually a sound theory. I would certainly never run one of the current pulsing battery restoration chargers on a battery when it is still in the vehicle. The devices typically send high frequency pulses on the battery terminals.

Also, it is a very accepted solution to put tetra-sodium EDTA into each battery cell. The EDTA will cause the lead sulphate to drop out of solution as sediment into the bottom of the battery.

I would investigate current drain gremlins before replacing the battery or trying to refurbish the battery.
 
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