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When I was milling about the internet trying to find out more on my ABS situation, I found this tid-bit regarding lifter noise/valve issues and the best thing to do to solve the problem before a massive overhaul would be needed. Have you all heard of this? Is it accurate and does it work? From an experienced LR owner/mechanic(?) on fixya.com...

"The Rover V-8 is extremely picky about having the correct anti-freeze solution in it and having regular oil and filter changes every 3K miles or so. The need for the oil changes stems from the hydraulic lifters in the valve train. They clog at the slightest excuse and stick, which results in rapid wear to the camshaft if the problem isn't corrected. Dirty oil is a prime cause of sticky lifters, either through dirt or through the formation of varnish. A Rover V-8 with a ticking valve is headed for a very expensive repair if the problem can't be corrected through chemotherapy. One of the most effective cures is to add a quart of automatic transmisson fluid to the oil and run it until the next oil change. If this doesn't cure the sticking lifter, nothing will except replacement of the lifters, a multi-thousand dollar job."
 

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I've had people tell me they've used Marvel Mystery oil to free up lifters and rings. However, if you have worn parts the gunk you are cleaning out may be what is providing a good seal. These are also the people that swear by those ring sealing products. My nephew used to do a radiator flush with that cleaner stuff on every used car he bought, then would be so surprised when the freeze plugs started leaking and had to be replaced.

If you lifters are rattling because they are dirty, any good detergent oil should clean them up without causing harm. Even then I would only run the detergent oil long enough to clean it a little, then switch back to just plain old oil. More important would be to make sure to use the proper oil weight for the seasonal temperature range you are running. To heavy an oil will have a problem feeding lifters when the engine is cold. To light an oil will not cushion the bearings very well. Oil pressure and bearing gaps are designed for a specific viscosity of oil to maintain proper lubrication.
 

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ATF is simply low weight extremely high detergent oil. Adding ATF to motor oil to clean deposits is an old trick and does wonders. If your rig is high mileage there is no ill effect of running a quart in the engine at all times. It is compatible with all dino oils of any weight and cleans without reducing lubrication like engine flush products. I have done it my self for 30+ years of working on all makes of cars. My grandfather had been doing this from the late 50's at his Cadillac dealership and in his persaonal cars. My LWB and P38 both have always had a quart added 500 miles or so before oil changes. My last Rolls and Maseratti both had a quart in them at all times due to high mileage and lack of service history.
 

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rrtoadhall said:
ATF is simply low weight extremely high detergent oil. Adding ATF to motor oil to clean deposits is an old trick and does wonders. If your rig is high mileage there is no ill effect of running a quart in the engine at all times. It is compatible with all dino oils of any weight and cleans without reducing lubrication like engine flush products. I have done it my self for 30+ years of working on all makes of cars. My grandfather had been doing this from the late 50's at his Cadillac dealership and in his persaonal cars. My LWB and P38 both have always had a quart added 500 miles or so before oil changes. My last Rolls and Maseratti both had a quart in them at all times due to high mileage and lack of service history.
It is not the oil that does the damage, it is the stuff that it may flush out due to too high a detergent levels. The only way out for the gunk is past bearings, which it will destroy. If you get too large a bits floating around they can jam up in engine bores, scratching both pistons and bores. Finally, the oil cooler is before the filter, therefore any gunk will be forced into the cooler, blocking it and restricting flow to the engine. Modern engine oils have more than enough detergent in them to clean motors gradually over time.
 

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Although very likely with flush products, very unlikely with ATF. Although your opinion is popular on the internet and is the rubber stamp answer for not using cleaning products, not all products are the same. ATF cleaning is a very slow process. Where a flush product would be like pressure washing dirt road, ATF is like using a paint brush to wash a dirt road. I'll stick with the 30+ years of experience I have with this process and it's positive results. :thumb:
 

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Adding ATF to engine oil is also a known trick in the aircraft industry. I have even known people to gradually add ATF in very small quantities down intakes when running at high revs to free up gunked up engines. Loads of smoke as it burns but apparently does the trick. Extreme in my view, which is why I've never personally done the same, though I can see the logical science behind this. Adding a small quantity of ATF to engine oil prior to an oil change makes sense to me.

If you are worried about adding ATF or any other engine oil flush before the oil change, why not do a 'quick change', i.e, an oil change with fresh filter, a hundred or so miles driving use, then followed by another oil/ filter change. Normally very good at cleaning sludge out the engine, without using anything you might worry about.
 

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After reading this thread I tried this. Considering the inside of my engine looks like a dirty bong :think: I thought it needed something. I added about two cups and drove it around for a couple hundred miles. I swear it got smoother running. I just changed the oil and now I notice smoother acceleration and idling. It may just be in my head but I think mikey likes it! The ATF in the intakes to free sticky valves and rings is true. I used to wrench at a shop with racing heritages back to the late forties and early fifties and the old man(original owner) used to do stuff like that all the time. Everybody would laugh and say he'd lost his mind but after the smoke cleared he would have turned a 1500$ top end rebuild estimate into 20mins with the air cleaner off and a bottle of ATF. 8-0= ... :clap: Never doubt the old knowledge...never try to understand it...but dont doubt it.
 

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I was thinking of doing the ATF in engine thing as mine is a dark brown colour, but I don't wan't to loosen up dirt particles etc and have them wear out the bores etc?
 
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