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Discussion Starter #1
I'm looking to possibly replace a/some solenoid/s in the valve body. I've read a few threads about this, including this one (Transmission is slipping into 4th gear) which gave me reason to think that's what's needed, possibly along with a Sonnax ZipKit. As my signature says, this is in a 2008 HSE with a ZF 6HP26 transmission (or a 6HP26X; I'm not sure about that and can't seem to find an answer, either way, nevertheless I think it's largely irrelevant).

As the title states, I'm wondering which solenoids go to the various gears. While I'd like to replace ALL the solenoids, I'm not sure that's really necessary, first off, but second off that's more expensive, obviously. Is this how the solenoids even work? Maybe I'm mistaken on the operation.

For what it's worth, I'll describe the problem in case I'm missing something - anyone please chime in if you have any ideas/thoughts on this. Initial driving while cold there seems to be little problem. Once the vehicle is driven for a while and things heat up, the shifting from 3rd to 4th gear is very laborious, if not near impossible - while accelerating. If I remove my foot off the gas and stop accelerating, the shift to 4th will occur smoothly with no problem. I want to say that going up hills often induces the problem faster and/or increases the frequency, but I'm not entirely sure about that.
 

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Not to be a downer, but I work on these all the time. And when I get slipping gear issues we will just rebuild them. If it's a solenoid failure then we usually put a whole valve body in it. Just my 0.02
 

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LEGACY VENDOR
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A single solenoid is a third of the price of the complete set, but the set contains seven solenoids ($85 vs $260). If it is just one solenoid that’s failing, the chances are the others aren’t far behind.



Phil
 

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You have to pull the valve body to change them, and there's little balls and things that you can lose and not install correctly which could kill your trans, my recommendation is to take it to a shop that deals with these transmissions, if something goes wrong you will see it will cost you alot more in the long run.
 

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If you’re replacing just the solenoids then you only have to separate the electronic module from the Mechatronic unit. There’s no need to separate the two halves of the valve body assembly







However, each solenoid has its own damper and failed solenoids often go hand-in-hand with worn dampers.



To replace the dampers you do need to split the valve body, which also means that the separator plate has to be replaced





Phil
 

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Ship your rover to ^^^ and have him fix it. Problem solved
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
However, each solenoid has its own damper and failed solenoids often go hand-in-hand with worn dampers.

To replace the dampers you do need to split the valve body, which also means that the separator plate has to be replaced
Thanks for the replies, gents.

Well.. hmm.. so maybe going with full solenoid replacement is best. Ok. Well... what would you recommend, RRPhil, when it comes to doing this sort of work as a non-professional mechanic? I estimate myself to have minimal to novice mechanical experience. I feel comfortable getting the valve body out, no problem - I've swapped the filter there without issue - but separating the valve body could get a little dicey, ya. I have some experience working with electronics and intricate units, but it sounds like it's not necessarily a walk in the park. If I were to somehow fumble and bumble, are pieces going to go flying? Are there "schematics" / instructions on proper assemblage if that were to happen and is reassembly even realistic?

Doing this would require a clean, safe space, well-lighted... what else? Tools look to be pretty standard. I read in that other thread that it would be a good idea to replace the jumper tubes and bridge seal, as well, is that correct?

It would be nice to do this myself and am up to the challenge, while fairly confident, but don't want to irrevocably damage the driveability/vehicle, either, of course.


Not to be a downer, but I work on these all the time. And when I get slipping gear issues we will just rebuild them. If it's a solenoid failure then we usually put a whole valve body in it. Just my 0.02
...
Ship your rover to ^^^ and have him fix it. Problem solved
I appreciate the reply and input. Yeah, I'm a little leery working on it in some respects, but the cost of taking it in really hurts. ;/ Obligatory "few thousand dollars vs. a few hundred.." ...hmm. Lemme see if I can afford to ship it the UK, that's a good idea! ha!

What is it that pushes you to recommend replacing the entire valve body? I can see that being easier, as it's a fairly quick replacement, but let's say if you were doing this yourself for your vehicle and are on a budget, is that what you'd still do? Seems like if you know the solenoids are faulty, then replacing those are pretty easy, as opposed to a whole new valve body which requires new solenoids all together, anyway.

Edit: I just noticed this on eBay: shorturl.at/jnNPW .. any thoughts?
 

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Thanks for the replies, gents.

Well.. hmm.. so maybe going with full solenoid replacement is best. Ok. Well... what would you recommend, RRPhil, when it comes to doing this sort of work as a non-professional mechanic? I estimate myself to have minimal to novice mechanical experience. I feel comfortable getting the valve body out, no problem - I've swapped the filter there without issue - but separating the valve body could get a little dicey, ya. I have some experience working with electronics and intricate units, but it sounds like it's not necessarily a walk in the park. If I were to somehow fumble and bumble, are pieces going to go flying? Are there "schematics" / instructions on proper assemblage if that were to happen and is reassembly even realistic?

Doing this would require a clean, safe space, well-lighted... what else? Tools look to be pretty standard. I read in that other thread that it would be a good idea to replace the jumper tubes and bridge seal, as well, is that correct?

It would be nice to do this myself and am up to the challenge, while fairly confident, but don't want to irrevocably damage the driveability/vehicle, either, of course.




I appreciate the reply and input. Yeah, I'm a little leery working on it in some respects, but the cost of taking it in really hurts. ;/ Obligatory "few thousand dollars vs. a few hundred.." ...hmm. Lemme see if I can afford to ship it the UK, that's a good idea! ha!

What is it that pushes you to recommend replacing the entire valve body? I can see that being easier, as it's a fairly quick replacement, but let's say if you were doing this yourself for your vehicle and are on a budget, is that what you'd still do? Seems like if you know the solenoids are faulty, then replacing those are pretty easy, as opposed to a whole new valve body which requires new solenoids all together, anyway.

Edit: I just noticed this on eBay: shorturl.at/jnNPW .. any thoughts?
Sorry I had the wrong location it's fixed now. I would recommend replacing the whole valve body as it will be easier for home gamers to accomplish. However, you will still need the assistance of a shop, the valve body itself will come with a shifting strategy code that will need to be programmed into the TCM otherwise you WILL burn up your transmission. And I'm not sure if a shop will just flash your TCM and let you be on your way. They will probably want to do the whole job to make sure everything is done right. And honestly, I wouldn't trust a shop that would just flash a TCM after a new valve body is installed. Just seems shady to me.

Oh and after the TCM and Valve body stuff is programmed, then you have to do the transmission adaption drive cycle. Which requires a scan tool again that has OEM capabilities so that when you're done with all that, it can learn how to fine tune and smooth out everything.

Even if you just replace the one solenoid and dampener, you still need to go through all the computer steps or you risk a Chernobyl style transmission.

short version: need expensive scan tool to complete repair, if not completed correctly you risk recreating Chernobyl in your transmission.
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
short version: need expensive scan tool to complete repair, if not completed correctly you risk recreating Chernobyl in your transmission.
I have access to the software and tools needed for scanning and programming. There are Certified Land Rover Techs who are available for that, fortunately.

I'm wondering what your thoughts are on some of the valve bodies being sold on eBay. Looks like some have lifetime warranties. (edit: here are a couple I found - eBay valve body1 - eBay valve body2) When you're replacing them are you replacing with new units or refurbished?

Let's say someone had no other option and had to replace the solenoids, the separator plate, and dampers, at home - what would you recommend?
 

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I recently replaced the solenoids and some rubber tubes and seals that go between the mechatronic unit and the transmission body. I did not take the mechatronic unit apart to change the dampers and hope this doesn’t become a problem in the future. The job is messy but straight forward if you have some basic skills, time and a very clean place to work.

I used RRPhil’s guides from various forum postings and completed the task with not problems having never doesn’t this before.

When I electrically tested the solenoids, it was obvious which ones had failed and they corresponded to the fault codes I was getting. I changed them all, of course. The rubber tubes are also known to result in down shift thumps which has since gone away.

Make sure you have plenty of the correct trans fluid on hand. Mine took 8 litres and I could not use the vehicle while I waited for the final couple of litres.

I have an 07 RRSC and it’s now running better than when I bought it 70k miles ago.

I ordered the following parts from the Californian Transmission Supply Company. You will also need to buy the oil pan/filter and oil which CTSC can also supply. Lastly, I also ordered a new filler bolt and some spare oil pan attachment bolts (3 off) since the torx heads were a little worn on a couple of them.

 

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My advice would be to just replace the solenoids as a complete set, and then reset the adaptions (charge pressure & time). Don’t bother separating the two valve body halves. That’s enough money to spend on a speculative fix and I would say you had a 90% chance of fixing the issue with the solenoids alone.

You should certainly replace the bridge seal and the four jump tubes on re-assembly.





If the connector sleeve has never been replaced, and has the original red seals, then I would replace that too, while you’re at it.



Phil
 

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Sorry RR876.

I was composing my reply as you posted yours.

Phil
No problem. I totally agree with your suggestions and pictures you added are super useful.

Thanks to you are your sharing of transmission knowledge, I was able to tackle this task myself very successfully and will soon help others in our club to do the same.

I believe it the dealerships’ common attitude to tell the customer to just buy a new transmission that gives LRs a bad rap. They are no more difficult to service than any other vehicle I have owned.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Yeah, no kidding, everyone here and especially RRPhil have been an enormous help. Truly grateful for all the information and time taken to help people. Wow. The amount of time and money saved, along with (practically) priceless confidence given to who knows how many people is remarkable. Lots and lots of thanks and appreciation. Discussion, team-work, and communication really makes a big difference.

With respect to our discussion here, I thought the bridge seal and jump tubes were inside the valve body, but that's wrong sounds like. Good to know.

I replaced the filter last year, along with the fluid. Of course, I'll need and want to replace the fluid again, but don't think that another filter already would be required. Maybe I'm mistaken, though.

And in due diligence, this solenoid set from CTSC looks to be the correct one, as it fits 6HP26 transmissions and looks to be applicable to the main parts list for this transmission/year/model/etc... To be clear, I haven't made a visual verification on the stamped transmission-plate for the exact main parts number, but from everything I've read this set works and is what is needed, as per the information here.

RR876, it sounds like when you replaced the solenoids you did not reset the adaptions and you've had no issues with that. You just did the work you've talked about here and secured everything in there, replaced the fluids, and started 'er up and everything was hunkey-dorey? WrenchMonger is saying reflashing the TCM and resetting the adaption settings totally and completely necessary. Maybe I'm not making a distinction between what he is saying and other possibilities, though - would be nice to have some clarification there. Anyway, I'd like to take it in for resetting the adaption settings, as RRPhil as advised, but sounds like I will be able to, at least, drive it to the shop/dealership to have that done, as opposed to having it towed, which is what I was thinking would be necessary.
 

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Actually I can’t remember if I reset the adaption values. You can always try driving it and see how it drives. It will eventually adjust to the new hardware. If the shifting is bad, then you can make the decision to take it somewhere to reset the adaption values. Otherwise, it will slowly adjust as necessary.
 

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BTW, if you are going to not replace the filter, which is what I did since I had changed the oil soon beforehand, you may want to replace the oil pan gasket and o ring on the suction tube.

 

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This post shows the seal locations, if it helps : ZF 6HP26 Teardown

As your transmission has a mechanically engaged park lock (i.e. cable operated from the shift lever) rather than an electrical one, you have the ‘M-shift’ Mechatronic rather than the ‘E-shift’. Just make sure, therefore, that you get the solenoid kit with the three blue, three yellow and one black solenoid (ZF part number 1068 298 044).



Phil
 

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Coming from someone who had never worked on a trans before I will say changing out the solenoids is pretty easy. The bridge and tubes are easy as well, just make sure you get the correct parts for everything. I got the wrong tubes and a couple stuck out too far. Honestly, the worst part about it is the smell of the trans fluid and no matter how careful you are it seems like it gets everywhere.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Good to hear, Robbing.

Ordering all the parts and goodies now. Will let you guys/gals know when they're all installed. Looking forward to getting in there and working on it.
 

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Mine will act funky between 3rd and 4th once in a while.
Thanks everyone on the post, it was very informative and I might give mine a go if it gets any worse.
Right now it rarely happens.
 
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