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2008 Range Rover L322 HSE
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212 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
My 2000 4.6 has overheated awhile back. I replaced the top end gaskets and that didn’t fix the issue. It gets hot after a few miles and blows the water/coolant out of the overflow tank.

we sold the 96 and trying to do something with the 2000.. sell for cheap or off to the yard.
not sure if it slipped a liner or what but it starts right up and runs fine but after 5-10 min it heats right up.

i would part it out but don’t have room to do it where I’m at. Was thinking replace the motor but don’t have the room still. I can barely get our 08 in the garage.

i still start it up every few days for a minute or two. And to move it around to keep it from looking abandoned at the house.

just not sure what to do with it.
 

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Premium Member
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1,333 Posts
No, a Range Rover does not have 2 thermostats. It has one double acting one, like most cars.
Good advice though, plenty of things should have been checked before suspecting the headgasket. Like radiator (could be clogged), viscous fan, thermostat...
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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359 Posts
Mine has 2. One in the intake manifold, and one down by the radiator, where the 3 hoses get together.
 

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Well take the one in the inlet manifold out. That is something that has been added by a previous owner who didn't know what he was doing. As for the OP, if it overheats after around 5 minutes of running, it's likely to be the water pump. I had one that would do it after 8 minutes at idle. OBD reader connected showed the temperature climb, hesitate a bit when the stat opened then start climbing again until it started to blow coolant out of the header tank. Water pump impeller had rotted away.
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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111 Posts
If you replaced the head gaskets (top end gaskets) then you have already put a lot of money into it. Just a little more time, money and effort will get the vehicle back on track.


Here is a list of what I would do. This list is in order of ease of getting it done and cost.

Before starting on the list. Is the original water pump on the vehicle? If so I would skip to step 4.

1. Bypass the heater core.
Go to the auto parts store and buy a hose that does a U-turn. It does not have to be a perfect U-turn and can have some bends in it. The hose should be about 5/8 diameter. Get the connections so you can take off the hoses that go to the heater core in the back of the engine bay and connect the U-turn hose.

Start up vehicle. If the Rover still overheats, reconnect everything back.

2. Remove hose that goes from radiator to the thermostat. Drain the radiator. Unhook the hose from the engine that goes to the top of the radiator. Pour in distilled water so the water flows out of the radiator. Did it flow well? If so then your radiator is fine. If not replace it.

Reconnect bottom hose. Fill radiator from the top hose and then reconnect hose Start up vehicle. If the Rover still overheats move to step 3.

3. Replace thermostat

Start up vehicle. If the Rover still overheats move to step 4.

4. Replace water pump

Start up vehicle. If the Rover still overheats move to step 5

5. Replace viscous fan clutch and fan (this is the most expensive part so I put it last)

At this point you have replaced all components of the cooling system. Only thing left would be to flush the engine's cooling channel with the hope there is a blockage.
 

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2008 Range Rover L322 HSE
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212 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Thanks Guys, I did repalce the thermostat a couple months before it started overheating. The main big overheat was due to the loss of coolant from the Throttle body plate warping. it of course happened on a trip out of town and on a windy narrow 2 lane road with no turnouts. Luckily i managed to get it to a rest stop as the red light came on. I let it cool then filled up with water and headed the rest of the way into town ok, I then stopped at the hardware store and bought 2 bolts to plug the throttle body lines and topped of the water and proceeded on the trip, got another few miles and it got hot again. at that point it was left to cool for a bit then off the the hotel where it stayed with my wife and oldest daughter, I took her car and youngest daughter home to get tools and came back in the morning to tow it home.

I will look into replacing the water pump and pull the radiator and see if it looks plugged up, maybe give it a good back flush and go from there.
The car runs great and I love to drive it, it does have some miles on it and a few quirks every now and then.
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover Classic
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1,413 Posts
its an aluminum radiator, you can't see if it is plugged or not and cannot be cleaned. a coolant system flush offers little to no help in removing residual scale, best advise is to replace radiator and possible heater core.
cooling issues are some of the most troublesome to resolve.
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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770 Posts
You can bend the tags up that holds the top and bottoms on the rads,but if it is blocked you need a small but sturdy rod to clear the pipes out, if it’s ever had engine seal of any type I would say buy a new rad, I did the heads on one last year that had had two doses of super steel ? Radiator was sealed shut, never seen anything as blocked as this was.
 

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2008 Range Rover L322 HSE
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212 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Ok I broke down and ordered a water pump, it showed up this morning in the mail. What is the nut size on the fan clutch? I have seen 32mm and 36mm, I just need to go borrow the right size wrench to get it off. Then will change it.

im hoping this fixes it, if so I might keep it for a backup vehicle or use it off and on.
 

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Premium Member
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1,333 Posts
It's a 36. Good luck with the rebuild!
 
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