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Discussion Starter #1
Hi!

I was hoping someone could tell me the best way to verify how I'm getting coolant in the oil?

i purchased a 06 Supercharged for my daughters 16th birthday coming up. I have a donner vehicle but I don't want to swap engines and then find out it was a oil cooler.

i spoke to the dealership and they told me that it is very rare for the head gasket to go on these and for only $500 + tow, they will determine the problem. I was told that the oil cools through the radiator which I did not know. I thought it was just the transmission that cools through the rad as well.

i would prefer to save the $ and do it myself if possible.

So far my plans are
fresh oil change
Top up coolant
compression test

if the compression test fails I assume I found the problem to be the head gasket.

if the compression test passes, what should I look at next?

the vehicle was purchased with milky oil half way up the dipstick, cranks over nice and quiet but won't start. There are no obvious leaks on the outside of rad, engine, and oil coolers. The coolant level is too low to see if there is oil in it.

i would hate to swap engines and find out it was a radiator and the problem is still there.

if I necessary I will tow it to the dealer and pay the $ but I really would rather not.

Thanks for any input in advance!
 

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2002-2005 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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First and foremost I would pull obd2 codes to see what comes up. That will hopefully point out few issues and directions. Next pull all the spark plugs and check them, look into the combustion chamber while spark plugs are out. Drain the coolant and take a nice look. After doing these, I think you will get a better perspective on how to proceed but surely you need to drain that nasty oil out of there and change the oil filter.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
The battery was disconnected so I am not sure if there will be any codes stored but I will check for sure.

The vehicle came from a lady that couldn't tell me anything as her boyfriend was driving at the time. it would be nice to ask him some questions to learn what happened up to that.

i am guessing I'll need a snake camera to view inside the combustion chamber.

Is it possible that the oil and coolant could mix through the radiator or oil coolers? Any known issues with these other areas?

Thanks for the response!
 

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2006-2009 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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Personally for $500 I'd get it to the dealer and let them pinpoint the problem, then decide what to do once you know what you are facing. I've heard of lots of cars having water in the oil but never heard of any with oil in the water.

Good luck.
Norm.
 

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2002-2005 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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RRToadHall I suggested to pull codes to see if the no start had set faults. The OP mentioned no start on top of cooling mixing with oil.
 

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Unless he also has other issues no codes are going to be logged, it is not important at this stage. The primary concern is to find the mechanical failure.
 

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i purchased a 06 Supercharged for my daughters 16th birthday coming up. I have a donner vehicle but I don't want to swap engines and then find out it was a oil cooler.
There is indeed a separate engine oil cooler as well as a separate transmission oil cooler. Both have their individual fluids that run through a matrix cooled by the general antifreeze circulation. The engine oil cooler has a 4 way connector that if damaged may allow oil and coolant to mix. I;ve never heard of the matrix actually failing... they are pretty well built.

As far as compression tests for a head gasket failure it certainly wouldn;t hurt but head gasket failures usually present with over heating. Then again I would have to agree with the dealer that head gasket failures on the 4.2SC are rare. I don;t think any member here has ever posted one.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks for the Info.

Any test for the engine oil cooler?

If the compression tests good, i guess it could still be a head gasket.

I wonder what tests the dealer will run? I know there is a exhaust gas dye test for the cooling system and compression test. Other than that I may have to pay the piper, in this case the dealer.
 

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In order for a head gasket failure to allow coolant into the oil the failure would have to be between an oil gallery and a coolant passage. As neither are under high pressure it's highly unlikely. Exhaust in coolant failures are from the extreme pressure of combustion. However a compression test and plug inspection would give you a good base line for the engine.
 

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2002-2005 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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First don't change any fluids until you do some checking as you may be wasting said fluids.

I would start old school. Pull the plugs and look at them. You are looking to see if one or more are much cleaner than the other. Do the same looking down the hole at each piston top. If you are seeing a clean piston top (and corresponding spark plug) on some but not all that is a good sign you have a blown head gasket.

To eliminate coolant issues others suggest, I would do a pressure test of the cooling system. This may tell you something, but then it may not, but it is pretty easy. If you have a breach the system pressure will not be maintained.



While the plugs are out a compression test would not hurt and will yield more information.

Do you have oil in the coolant or only coolant in the oil?

If you want to continue, try bypassing the 4 way cooler with straight hose, change your fluids (oil and water) and see what you get trying to start the truck. A blown head gasket may throw some misfire codes - correlate this with your visual inspection of piston top and sparkplugs.

Other option is to pull the 4 way cooler from the donor and swap it over.
 

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2010-2012 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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Milky oil suggests some manner of oil and water mix.

First of all, you need to rule out the cooling system being compromised by a failing head gasket or some other internal coolant seal.

For less than $100 you can pick up a cooling system pressure tester and quickly determine whether the cooling system is retaining pressure or leaking someplace. See link below for an example...

https://www.harborfreight.com/radiator-pressure-tester-kit-63862.html

It will be evident if the pressure bleeds down quickly that the cooling system is compromised.

From there, remove the spark plugs and perform a compression test.

Hold the throttle body butterfly open with a clamp and crank the engine at least 5 rotations to allow sufficient air to cycle through the motor.

For a serviceable motor you should record 8 consistent readings, within 5% or so of each other. Some folks may be OK with a 10% range.

If you discover a pair of adjacent cylinders with much lower readings than the other 6, the chances are that the head gasket is leaking in that area.

I very much doubt you'll be able to find a small enough borescope to fit through the spark plug aperture and view the compression chamber with sufficient clarity.

From your original description, it sounds like the problem will be of the mechanical kind. There may be codes which reveal WHY the car may have overheated (if that's what happened - low coolant level etc) but your immediate issue is to determine WHAT you have to work with, right now.

Of course, at some point you'll want to determine WHY the cooling system failed [look at the onboard history/logged fault code(s)] so that you can confidently return your car to regular use, once repaired.

Rob
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Thanks for all the suggestions.

I cleaned out my garage on the weekend so I am going to try and test things out later this week.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Changed the oil

checked the compression and all cylinders are around 15 lbs

i am guessing all the valves are bent hence no compression.

I guess the next step will be swapping the engine.

any suggestions on better to remove it from the top or the bottom?

I have swapped a few engines before but looking at this one scares the cra# out of me.
 

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2006-2009 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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How would all the valves be bent? Bent valves don't usually put oil in the water, or vis versa. What kind of history do you have on it? You did hold the throttle open while cranking the engine over. If the throttle is closed you will get significantly lower compression readings than if it is held open. Supecharger belt is on and the supercharger is spinning during cranking?.

If the valves are bent you can get a boroscope down the sparkplug hole and see the tops of the pistons, they will have some kind of dent in them if the valves hit the pistons
 

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Discussion Starter #16
All belts are there.im guessing the timing chain went and the valves all hit the Pistons and broke into the water jacket.

i didn't know that the compression could be affected by the throttle being opened or closed.

i learnt something new today.
 

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BMW are non interference engines, so many members have reported. IF the timing chains let go you are not going to trash pistons, bend valves etc. If folks claiming these are noninterference are wrong... you may be totally screwed and looking for a new engine.
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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BMW are non interference engines, so many members have reported. IF the timing chains let go you are not going to trash pistons, bend valves etc. If folks claiming these are noninterference are wrong... you may be totally screwed and looking for a new engine.
The BMW M62 IS an interference engine. I have personally checked this on one of my engines.

http://www.rangerovers.net/forum/6-range-rover-mark-iii-l322/147298-03-rr-timing-chain-broke-possible.html#post1045266
 
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