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Discussion Starter #1
I just purchased a 2018 RR TD6 HSE. It has a beautiful ride and I know it will be very capable off road, which is one of the reasons I bought it given my need for over-sand and winter mud/snow travel. I understand that it's a very large, heavy car but the amount of body lean on undulating and curvy mountain roads is more than I anticipated, even when driving in "Dynamic" mode. In fairness, I'm coming from slightly smaller, more "sport" oriented SUVs like our Cayenne S, and my old Touareg, and I did consider the RR Sport, but it wasn't as large as I wanted. Has anyone done any aftermarket modifications of suspension? Perhaps larger sway bars? Any ideas? The dealer mentioned that RR may roll out SVO aftermarket tuning options but that could be a few years from now, if it does happen. Who are some of the trusted vendors for aftermarket suspension tuning for RR's?
 

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There's no need to reinvent the L405. Slow down and drive it how it was meant to be driven. I have driven 3 of the diesels now and have no issues with body roll on winding back roads or mountain passes. The diesels are effortless through corners and show no hesitation on hills.

Treat it like a proper Range Rover and she will not let you down. Treating her like your old Cayenne and expecting the same result will naturally cause disappointment. They are two very different beasts with two very different demographics.
 

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Stay away from '70's and early '80's classics then, no sway bars fitted to those cars. Cornering was like being in a sail boat, lots of fun! It's my understanding that LR only fitted sway bars to keep the Americans happy when they reentered the US market in 87/88.
 

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The main reason I chose V8 for my 2018 RR was to get the active cornering compensation. Seems only on V8 in the US--for either RRS or RR. Another benefit is that the sway bars auto-disengage for off-road wheel articulation (I use it). My 2017 RRS Td6 doesn't have this, and I figured I was missing something.

The body lean in corners is approx. half using the active system (V8 only). That's good enough that you don't notice any issue on tight bends. However, the system doesn't do anything to make small steering adjustments any stiffer (it's not fast enough for that). So due to the extra weight of the V8 engine in the front, my handling for small course corrections is probably not as good as the Td6 RR. I didn't compare that. Overall, the Td6 has a great feel to it on the RRS. I imagine the full size is the same. Enough power; and more importantly, you never feel like you're doing anything excessive (since it's low rpms). You can use all the power starting off. The V8 has more reserve power, but you almost never will use it.

It's great that we have dynamic mode now for all engines. Maybe some kind of tuning tool could be used to make it a even stiffer? That's probably the least intrusive way. Nothing can be done about the spring rate of the air suspension (softer than RRS), but the electronic damping could be a little stiffer without being over-damped.

Anyway, I know we should all just relax and ride. And everything is some compromise. But it would be nice to have a little tighter control if it's possible somehow. Regardless, I love my full size RR, and the view and ride while traveling through mountains and deserts is better than anything else out there. The only way to have a high seating position like we do with reasonable handling is the aluminum construction of the RR.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
The main reason I chose V8 for my 2018 RR was to get the active cornering compensation. Seems only on V8 in the US--for either RRS or RR. Another benefit is that the sway bars auto-disengage for off-road wheel articulation (I use it). My 2017 RRS Td6 doesn't have this, and I figured I was missing something.

The body lean in corners is approx. half using the active system (V8 only). That's good enough that you don't notice any issue on tight bends. However, the system doesn't do anything to make small steering adjustments any stiffer (it's not fast enough for that). So due to the extra weight of the V8 engine in the front, my handling for small course corrections is probably not as good as the Td6 RR. I didn't compare that. Overall, the Td6 has a great feel to it on the RRS. I imagine the full size is the same. Enough power; and more importantly, you never feel like you're doing anything excessive (since it's low rpms). You can use all the power starting off. The V8 has more reserve power, but you almost never will use it.

It's great that we have dynamic mode now for all engines. Maybe some kind of tuning tool could be used to make it a even stiffer? That's probably the least intrusive way. Nothing can be done about the spring rate of the air suspension (softer than RRS), but the electronic damping could be a little stiffer without being over-damped.

Anyway, I know we should all just relax and ride. And everything is some compromise. But it would be nice to have a little tighter control if it's possible somehow. Regardless, I love my full size RR, and the view and ride while traveling through mountains and deserts is better than anything else out there. The only way to have a high seating position like we do with reasonable handling is the aluminum construction of the RR.
Very interesting and helpful! It sounds like we both had a similar thought process when ordering, but slightly different priorities. I too considered going for the V8 just so that I could select the active suspension (I loved the RRS for handling but needed the size of the full RR), but ultimately decided that having the diesel was more important to me. I must say that I love the TD6, as I'm sure you do with your RRS - great low and mid-end torque, plenty of power in everyday driving conditions and amazing range and mileage. On a recent trip back from VT, on the 2+ hr highway portion of the trip, I averaged over 32 mpg -- simply phenomenal for a SUV this large. That's notable that you feel that your new RR has about half the body roll versus a RR without the active suspension. Would be really nice if they roll that out to the rest of the line-up in the US in upcoming years as an option. I'm hesitent to mess with the dampening of the air suspension - even in dynamic mode it gives the car a bit more of a hard edge, without appreciably taming body roll (at least my perception), but it does seem like slightly stiffer/more progressive springs, or better yet, retrofitting with slightly larger sway bars, could reduce body roll without compromising ride quality too much. As you suggested, each comes with it's own compromises no doubt. Unlike you, off-road wheel articulation shouldn't be as important to my needs, so I'm less concerned with how larger sway bars might impact functionality. Summers I have to deal with deep sand on weekends to get to a summer place, which is more about clearance, momentum and a great 4 wheel drive system/locking diffs. That was a big selling point of a RR over other SUV options. I'll continue to poke around on aftermarket spring and sway bar options. I'm also going to dig into what the suspension differences are between your "active suspension" V8 and my TD6. It may be that the OEM spring and/or sway bar specs are a bit different as well.

Many thanks again!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Stay away from '70's and early '80's classics then, no sway bars fitted to those cars. Cornering was like being in a sail boat, lots of fun! It's my understanding that LR only fitted sway bars to keep the Americans happy when they reentered the US market in 87/88.
Ha! As a sailor, I can appreciate the analogy. A bit of "heeling" can be expected in the classics...and appreciated!
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Get a lowering module or the gap suspension tool and lower all 4 corners a bit and that should give you a more dynamic ride
Thanks for the suggestion - is this something that is available aftermarket? Which vendor?
 

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Interesting thread. Having owned similar German suvs I too find the body roll disconcerting at times. At interstate speeds, even the lane correction can cause the vehicle to sway when it kicks in but that’s usually when in normal or comfort mode. I have the gas 6 and wasn’t aware the 8 included different suspension options. If I were to do it over, that would be a consideration. That said, I find the vehicle incomparably smooth and refined so on balance I’m very happy with the ride quality.
 

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Just want to say that I'm not convinced that lowering will improve all of the handling. Lowering the center of gravity is usually a good idea and could help the body roll. But I've noticed that changing to off-road height on the other hand actually makes the suspension feel stiffer--with a quicker and more fun steering response. I know it's counter-intuitive. Something about the extra pressure to pump up the air springs? Or maybe their geometry when inflated more? Same effect on both RRS and full-size, but a little more obvious on the Sport. Of course it's only testable < 31 mph and not practically useful.

But it might mean that lowering could in fact give softer handling--and possibly even more body roll if the air springs are really softer when lower. Maybe someone else knows more details about the air springs. I'm traveling now, so I can't try it again to be sure. You can compare normal vs off-road yourself the next time you drive. Note that above 31 mph, the suspension lowers to an intermediate height without telling you, and it's more difficult to feel the difference.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Do you know what changes RR incorporates into its "Dynamic Response" feature on your new V8? I took a quick look on the RR website but haven't yet found more than a brief description of the feature. I did find a 2015 RR Dynamic Response YouTube video (https://youtu.be/XulkFsUnw64) -- is this basically the same system currently offered by RR? In the video, it is suggested that the system can reduce body roll in an evasive maneuver from 3.2 degrees on a stock vehicle to just 0.6 degrees. In the absence of an active system like this, it would seem like bigger roll bars, perhaps coupled with more progressive springs might be a reasonable aftermarket option. Raising the air suspension to off road probably does firm the suspension and change the geometry but it's likely battling the higher center of gravity at the same time, which could be counterproductive. I once got to sample what happens when the air suspension is too soft...the air suspension in my original VW Touareg V8 (first gen) temporarily failed and I was left bouncing and rolling along on the springs without any dampening. I don't recommend it.
 

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Hadn't seen that video. Wow, that's more impressive than I knew (I thought roll reduced 50%). As you noticed, clear info is hard to come by on the "dynamic response" system. Apparently it's been known by various other names such as ACE (active cornering enhancement) for the earlier versions in the past. I'm surprised that the response is fast enough for "evasive maneuvers". That's wonderful. It is not fast enough from experience to give a very tight on-center feel for normal steering corrections. The dynamic mode helps with that (and overall it really is great), but it would be nice for it to help even more. Here are two articles I found:
http://www.autonews.com/article/20130612/CUTAWAY01/130619957/bwi-helps-smooth-out-ride-in-new-range-rover
http://www.car-engineer.com/range-rover-sport-suspension-designusing-bwi-airspring-active-roll-control-technology/
I think the RRS and RR share the same system (but likely different calibration), and it's only on V8 (standard and no option on Td6 unfortunately!!). Your video also mentions 100 mm extra off-road wheel articulation, which I think is in a RR brochure too (I believe rear wheels only, and I'm not sure if the 100 mm is each wheel or added up together for better sales presentation).

It's a pretty complicated system. I found maintenance info on the version used pre-L405, and it's daunting (a lot of electronics). I doubt there's any way to retrofit this. Yes, I also wish LR would allow ordering "dynamic response" (and the locking rear diff) as an option across all of the engines--especially Td6.
 

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Not sure if the Diesel models are different, I have a 2018 RR V8 and a 2016 RRS V8, both have all the mechanical components needed to adjust the suspension to any driving condition, like height adjustment, Sway Bar disengaging, active suspension, differential lock etc etc, but this is achieved by software tuning. Changing any of this components will certainly void your warranty and open a whole Pandora box of problems, error messages and warning lights everywhere. Even if there are aftermarket parts designed to seamless integrate with you particular vehicle they are usually not available before 3 or more years after the vehicle is released and the aftermarket vendor had time to develop the products.
 
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