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Discussion Starter #1
Hi guys,

Is anyone aware if there is a 'Reliable' alternative to M62 engine equipped on the L322?
 

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2002-2005 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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I assume you're speaking of shoehorning something like a Ford 302 small block into the engine bay. Don't know about that. (Thoroughly useless trivia: Here in the U.S., similar old-school engines from competing manufacturers generally weigh about the same, with two exceptions I'm aware of. Chrysler big blocks -- 440 etc. -- are relatively heavy. And Ford small blocks -- 302 etc. -- are relatively light.)

Other than old-age/worn-oil timing chain issues, both the BMW and Jaguar mills in the L322 are well-respected by Rover mechanics. Compared with the previous Rover mills, they're reliable, high-performing engines. They'll happily bite an owner if abused, neglected or simply worn out, and rebuilds at a shop are pricey, but no surprises there.

The Robison Service website (a larger Massachusetts Rover shop) states: "The BMW V8 is an excellent motor...Do 7,500-10,000 mile oil changes and these motors will last forever...Some people still prefer the BMW engine but I think the (2006+) Jaguar V8 is actually the best motor Land Rover ever fitted for the U.S. market."
 

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2002-2005 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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I find the M62TU to be a very reliable engine, as long as you do the necessary maintenance: PCV valve and hoses, timing chain tensioners, Vanos reseal, keep up on the cooling system. I haven't heard of head gaskets failing or Nikasil issues, or rod bearings, unless the owner runs the engine really hot. I suggest keeping up with the maintenance versus changing out the engine.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thank you for your input.
The engine is already busted.
I was wondering the possibility of mounting a 4.2L V8 Supercharged but then I don’t know whether
1) Will it be a straight mount without any modifications
2) Will the newer transmission also mount (6 speed ZF)
3) What about ECU, TCU, BCM etc

I hope a LR specialist will be able to throw some light on this.
 

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I am pretty sure there will be significant work to get everything working even if the mechanical bits go OK. Most modern dashes are ECU dependant, and the ECU is engine dependant. Something to check out. Why not get a 5 or 7 series BMW engine and stick it in there? That is what I would do.
 

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1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
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I find the M62TU to be a very reliable engine, as long as you do the necessary maintenance: PCV valve and hoses, timing chain tensioners, Vanos reseal, keep up on the cooling system. I haven't heard of head gaskets failing or Nikasil issues, or rod bearings, unless the owner runs the engine really hot. I suggest keeping up with the maintenance versus changing out the engine.
the sprocketless u-guide design is garbage and will fail no matter what you do. once that’s done it’s a pretty good engine. also has the uncanny ability to be overheated over and over and over again without cracking a head or warping the block.

the bigger issue is that the transmission isn’t very good
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I’ve identified an engine (with Ancillaries) on eBay clocked about 110000 Miles. I have been trying to find if there is any company which has a full engine rebuild kit with more reliable parts but so far no luck. Can someone confirm if there is a possibility to plonk a supercharger on this engine?
 

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the sprocketless u-guide design is garbage and will fail no matter what you do. once that’s done it’s a pretty good engine. also has the uncanny ability to be overheated over and over and over again without cracking a head or warping the block.

the bigger issue is that the transmission isn’t very good
The guides have a replacement interval, so replace them. I can do the job in about 20 hours in my driveway with no lift, for about $500 in genuine BMW parts, that includes resealing the Vanos as well.

Regarding the heat, spend $100 and run a cooler thermostat. I’m actually working on installing a 75 degree C Febi unit at the moment.

The M62TU is infinitely more reliable than say a twin turbo BMW N63; now that engine is a joke.

The Ford 5.0L V8s in the later L322 and L405 rovers are a real PITA to work on and time. They also use direct injectors that contribute to intake valve carbon fouling. Both the injectors and fuel pumps are overly expensive, unnecessarily difficult to work on and not very DIY friendly.

In my opinion, people dislike the M62TU engines because A. They don’t know how to work on them, or B. They don’t want to do the necessary maintenance and then blame the engine when it breaks. Anything will break due to lack of maintenance. I’m capable, willing, and diligent about doing all required maintenance and have a flawlessly running Rover 2 at 168,000 miles.

You want to get rid of your M62TU? Ship it to me in Maryland. I’d love to restore it to like new condition and then proudly show you how reliable it truly is in the right hands.


Respectfully, in regards to the OP, Samuell’s last question, you’re asking about increasing the reliability of the engine but yet you also ask about running forced induction (FI). Whenever you add FI to any engine, you are literally putting it under increased pressure and stressing it out beyond its naturally aspirated operating parameters. As a consequence, everything wears out faster in the engine. You effectively lose reliability when running forced induction.

It’s a compromise that you have to find the right balance of for you: run FI and get a marginal HP and torque improvement, but at reduced reliability, or keep up with the maintenance and keep the engine stock and run it for many years. You can’t have both. If you’re really committed to going FI, check out VF Engineering. They have bolt on kits for the M62TU’s application in the BMW E39 that could probably be adapted to the Rover.
 

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The guides have a replacement interval, so replace them. I can do the job in about 20 hours in my driveway with no lift, for about $500 in genuine BMW parts, that includes resealing the Vanos as well.

Regarding the heat, spend $100 and run a cooler thermostat. I’m actually working on installing a 75 degree C Febi unit at the moment.

The M62TU is infinitely more reliable than say a twin turbo BMW N63. Now that engine is a joke.

The later Ford 5.0L V8s in the later rovers are a real PITA to work on and time. They also use direct injectors that contribute to intake valve carbon fouling. Both the injectors and fuel pumps are overly expensive, unnecessarily difficult to work on and not very DIY friendly.

In my opinion, people dislike the M62TU engines because A. They don’t know how to work on them, or B. They don’t want to do the necessary maintenance and then blame the engine when it breaks. Anything will break due to lack of maintenance. I’m capable, willing, and diligent about doing all required maintenance and have a flawlessly running Rover 2 at 168,000 miles.

You want to get rid of your M62TU? Ship it to me in Maryland. I’d love to restore it to like new condition and then proudly show you how reliable it truly is in the right hands.


Respectfully, in regards to the OP, Samuell’s last question, you’re asking about increasing the reliability of the engine but yet you also ask about running forced induction (FI). Whenever you add FI to any engine, you are literally putting it under increased pressure and stressing it out beyond its naturally aspirated operating parameters. As a consequence, everything wears out faster in the engine. You effectively lose reliability when running forced induction.

It’s a compromise that you have to find the right balance of for you: run FI and get a marginal HP and torque improvement, but at reduced reliability, or keep up with the maintenance and keep the engine stock and run it for many years. You can’t have both. If you’re really committed to going FI, check out VF Engineering. They have bolt on kits for the M62TU’s application in the BMW E39 that could probably be adapted to the Rover.
I second this. The M62TU engines are actually very reliable if they’re just kept maintained. A buddy of mine always tells me how in Russia the M62TU is a “staple” engine for German car enthusiasts and they they run these high performance engines easily to the 500k mark while beating the crap out of them in the process. All they do is keep the engines maintained well and any issues that arise they fix them immediately.
 
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