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Can anyone tell me what type of anti-freeze should be used in a 1995 4.6 HSE Auto? The workshop manual gives the concentration and all sorts of advise regarding different grades of lubricating oils but no mention as to whether Red or Green anti freeze should be used.
I have recently purchased the above vehicle and this is my first P38 (though I did own a Classic some years ago in the UK). The colour of the existing anti-freeze could be anything from lime juice to mulligatawny (almost impossible to guess) and I doubt if the car has had a service since it was imported from Japan nearly 11 years ago. Like a lot of Land Rovers it drives like a dream with no bad noises and seems to thrive on neglect, however my nerves do not, so I want to give it the best service it has had in years so do need to know what to use in the cooling system. Any advice would be most welcome..
 

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give it a good flush out before putting any coolant in it as they don't like mixing with other brands , as for coolant type I use an inhibitor more than a coolant . coolants are very expensive and unless you really need to use coolant consider an inhibitor (corrosion preventer) as for which coolant its personal choice IMHO.
 

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On pre-99 cars Ethylene Glycol based anti-freeze was recommended, that's the blue or green stuff. On later cars they recommended OAT, red or orange. I doubt there's any real difference other than OAT wasn't available in 1995.
 

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Original Blue or Green IAT (inorganic acid tech) lasts 2 years, the later pink or orange OAT ( organic acid) lasts 5. They do not mix, they coagulate to a core-blocking sludge, so complete flushing is necessary. It takes time for the old-tech ingredient to leave the metal surfaces that it it is passivating, to make way for the new, so drive around on plain water for a couple of flushes(... couldn't find advice on this point) before the change-over? By 'antifreeze', we are actually talking about anti-corrosion here. If you live in a freezing climate, you obviously need glycol, but if not, a 50:50 glycol mix has a higher boiling point, but 30% less heat capacity than plain water. For those tempted, Evans waterless coolant seems to be of no benefit for road cars, considering it's expense, difficulty with keeping it uncontaminated, and poor metal-to-coolant transfer.
Be sure to read up on p38's special flushing procedure.
While researching this after finding corrosion holes in my radiator's tank-mounting flange, it is apparently wise to earth the radiator core; apart from any stray current from the car's electrics, static can apparently be generated in, and travel along, an insulated driveline to the water jacket.
..
 

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Interesting number of replies. As I live in a temperate climate, here in New Zealand, it would make sense to replace with the original Green Anti-freeze. We do get low temperatures, even here in Nelson, in winter, when it is not unknown to get down to -10C, at night, I can just about squeeze the R/Rover into the garage, but it is a tricky job, so it will have to live outside in the car port. Thanks for all the advise.
 

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There are three classes of coolant that are commonly used for passenger vehicles: IAT (original Ethylene Glycol based, blue or green, has been around for a long time), OAT (orange coolant, aka DEX-cool) and the latest and greatest - HOAT. The orange stuff is known in the GM community as "the class action coolant". They thought it was going to be long lasting, but it wasn't. It's more expensive than IAT and lasts about the same, may be only slightly longer. I would not recommend using it.

Some newer cars mandate HOAT. If you see a coolant that is advertised as "compatible with every coolant, regardless of color" it's HOAT. This is, to the best of my knowledge, the best option. As far as I know there are no ill effects from using HOAT. I would still flush the system prior to changing the coolant and change according to the schedule in the the owner's manual.
 

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'95 originally used blue, 50/50 mix...Original Blue or Green IAT (inorganic acid tech) lasts 2 years, the later pink or orange OAT ( organic acid) lasts 5. They do not mix, they coagulate to a core-blocking sludge, so complete flushing is necessary. It takes time for the old-tech ingredient to leave the metal surfaces that it it is passivating, to make way for the new, so drive around on plain water for a couple of flushes? (... couldn't find advice on this point) before the change-over.
If you have blue now, stick with it and save the hassle of change-over to pink. It's cheap...renew it now and every second year...write the date on your overflow bottle with a whiteout pen. If you now have pink, renew it with pink, with a plain-water flush, and know for sure how old it is.
By 'antifreeze', we are mainly talking about anti-corrosion here. If you live in a freezing climate, you obviously need glycol, but if not, a 50:50 glycol mix has a higher boiling and lower freezing point, but 30% less heat capacity than just plain water with a corrosion additive, so more glycol is not better. For those tempted, Evans waterless coolant seems to be of no benefit for road cars, considering it's expense, difficulty with keeping it uncontaminated, and poor metal-to-coolant heat transfer. (Glycol is banned on race tracks.)
NB... Be sure to google the p38's special flushing procedure.
While researching this after finding corrosion holes in my radiator's tank-mounting flange, it is apparently wise to earth the radiator core; apart from any stray current from the car's electrics, static can apparently be generated in, and travel along, a rubber-insulated driveline to the water jacket, causing galvanic corrosion.
..
 
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