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2002-2005 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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Discussion Starter #1
This is regarding a 2007 HSE with 190k miles.

I'll start off by saying I have searched and read through every relevant post on this topic this website and google has to offer, so I'll ask a few different questions than what others have asked.

I recently had my fuel pump fail (one day vehicle would crank but not start) and so replaced the fuel pump and filter. While doing that I decided to clean the MAF sensor with MAF sensor cleaner, install new spark plugs, ignition capacitor, PCV valve, and air filter. I reset the adaptive values with my allcoms. The vehicle now starts fine, drives ok but I'm getting some oil smoke on start up occasionally. The vehicle drives ok, but under high load or WOT I'm getting a clicking sound from the front right side (like from the PCV) and large amounts of thick oil smoke out the exhaust. I get the P0171 and P0174 lean codes consistently. I've swapped my old PCV valve back on, same thing. Have gone through a tank of gas and refilled at a different gas station with the same results.

If my new fuel pump was functional but "weak" could this cause the PCV to malfunction at high RPMs/loads? Unfortunately my allcoms can't show me fuel pressure, and the fuel rail doesn't have a valve for a gauge.

Any tips on how best to check fuel pressure, or things I should try to solve the problem? Any help is much appreciated.
 

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It sounds like you found your problem.. the PCV valve

Replace only with a genuine valve, I think Lucky 8 offroad carries them. Atlantic British seems to be overpriced even with their supposed “customer service”. Nothing against them but LK8 has been of equal service and very inexpensive.

Anyway, I bet that’s your problem considering you’re getting oil into the exhaust.


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Discussion Starter #3
Indeed the new PCV I bought was just a $20 part from eBay. I figured a spring and diaphragm has got to be pretty hard to screw up manufacturing. Perhaps I was wrong. And then I suppose my old PCV valve is bad as well. Not that shocking at 190k miles. Will try a new OEM PCV.

Anything else that can cause oil to get burned under heavy load? Perhaps more importantly, anything else that would cause oil to accumulate in the intake plenum during normal driving that then gets sucked in and burned under heavy load/WOT?
 

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2006-2009 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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If you find out what the solution is please post. I have had those two codes forever and haven't been able to get rid of them.
 

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That would either be piston rings or the PCV system. The PCV system is what causes oil buildup in the intake, but that is relatively normal over miles upon miles.


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My Bank 1 post cat lean code that I had a few times last October finally became a Bank 1 lean code P0171, yesterday (took about 6 months). My fuel adaptation balances have been lean in the 1800 RPM levels and up, but not enough to set a code until now. I've got 195K miles on my 4.4L and I replaced my PCV last fall and it really didn't do much, maybe it held off the lean code coming back sooner. About once a month or once every 6 weeks I will get a puff of blue smoke out the tailpipes on the first start of the day. I've smoked my intake, cleaned the original MAF, put a new MAF in, replaced the air filter, nothing has helped so far. Now I only have a single bank that is showing the lean code, not both. I think its my injectors, I've got a new set sitting here on the coffee table infront of me, so I guess I'm going to have to put them in this weekend, if its not raining.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
That's very interesting MARK C, seems we've both got lean issues and excess oil getting into the intake manifold. Glad you've got a starting point by having a bank specific lean code.

I am wondering if running the 4.4 engine lean at higher RPM by either low fuel pressure or sticking injectors could somehow have an effect on the PCV valve function.
 

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Well I managed to download a new ECU calibration file from LR thru my copy of SDD and get it installed yesterday. It wiped out all my short and long term adaptations so starting today I'll see where they are going as it relearns what it needs to. Probably take all week to come up with a new set of adaptions to see it its still running lean or not. Hopefully my mileage will come back up, as this issue has taken a 3 to 3.5 MPG bite out of my mileage (18.5 overall to 15.2) since it started.
 

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Lean codes are either not enough fuel or unmetered air entering the system. You are chasing your tail if you cannot see the Long Term Fuel Trims. I chased this for months on mine and while I cannot explain it replacing the air filter eliminated the faults.
 

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I can see mine (well I could before the software revision erased them), and my bank one side has been pretty consistantly lean for the past 8 months or so. Don't know if the OP can see his. I've replaced the PCV, the MAF, cleaned the throttlebody (both sides), smoke tested my intake and exhaust, replaced my plugs, coils, and the air filter and so far nothing has helped. There is a TSB for an ECU software revision for this issue that is probably 6 years old. When I checked SDD for solutions it suggested the download, and I finally have a copy that will communicate with the LR server so I was able to get the files and update the ECU, and as part of that update it cleared out my adaptations. This is my 11/18/2018 Bank 1 and part of Bank 2 Long Term Fuel Trim and you can see how horribly lean the bank 1 side is, pretty much thru out the whole operating range.

20181118_194815_resized.jpg

Bank 2 is a little better but still lean.

Today after doing the update, my mileage has increased, from 15.2 (average over about 4 months worth of tank refills) to 16.9 (on a fuel tank basis - I reset CONS-2 every time I fill up) but I've only driven it 55 miles since filling the tank, so it could go either way from there. Maybe Wednesday or thereabouts I'll pull the adaptation values to see what they are. Typically it takes several weeks for all of the fields in the adaptation tables to fill in (the black boxes in the image above are values that have not been set when the data was gathered). I still think I'm looking at new injectors as a possible solution, with 195K miles theres probably enough wear in them and maybe junk in the internal screens to cause a lean issue.
 

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I suspect that your oil consumption has finally destroyed tour catalytic convertor. Typically, oil consumption is almost invisible since the convertor heat burns off what oil enters them. As the substrate decomposes from oil, it becomes less effective at storing O2, which is how the post cat O2 determines catalyst effectiveness. That will set codes for convertor effectiveness. The post cat code for leanness is likely due to oil fouling that O2 sensor. The primary issue appears to be oil related, and that issue will need to be resolved before repairing the O2 issues. Try this: remove the PCV valve and look to see whether it is oil saturated. If it is, you may have engine issues. If it is simply dirty, (I doubt this at this point,) considering the fact that you tried a different valve. If it is saturated, or appears oily, you may have issues with liquid oil entering the valve. Let us know what you find, and we'll pursue options when we know... Ray
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Quick update. After installing a new OEM PCV valve the oil burning has been completely eliminated. No more smoke on start up and no more smoke or clicking under load/WOT. So the brand new aftermarket PCV valve from eBay proved to be different somehow (spring/vacuum pressure perhaps?) and useless.

Unfortunately, both bank's lean codes, P0171 and P0174 persist. I cleared adaptations again after installing the new PCV but they came back after another ~40 miles. I cleared them again hoping to continue to define the adaptive values from more driving, but they still came back after another ~40 miles. Still stumped...

The vehicle was running completely fine 2 weeks ago (before my fuel pump failed). So at this point I think either something is wrong with my new fuel pump or I've screwed up my MAF sensor by cleaning it. Maybe, my new fuel pump is providing too much pressure for my old injectors to handle and they're sticking some? But I doubt that would result in uniform bank 1 and bank 2 codes, without any cylinder specific problems. I don't think the few days of smoky start ups was enough to damage my cats, maybe my O2 sensors should be replaced but I don't see anything out of the ordinary in the upstream or downstream voltage outputs. So, I'm planning to replace my MAF sensor with an OEM part next.
 

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Quick update. After installing a new OEM PCV valve the oil burning has been completely eliminated. No more smoke on start up and no more smoke or clicking under load/WOT. So the brand new aftermarket PCV valve from eBay proved to be different somehow (spring/vacuum pressure perhaps?) and useless.

Unfortunately, both bank's lean codes, P0171 and P0174 persist. I cleared adaptations again after installing the new PCV but they came back after another ~40 miles. I cleared them again hoping to continue to define the adaptive values from more driving, but they still came back after another ~40 miles. Still stumped...

The vehicle was running completely fine 2 weeks ago (before my fuel pump failed). So at this point I think either something is wrong with my new fuel pump or I've screwed up my MAF sensor by cleaning it. Maybe, my new fuel pump is providing too much pressure for my old injectors to handle and they're sticking some? But I doubt that would result in uniform bank 1 and bank 2 codes, without any cylinder specific problems. I don't think the few days of smoky start ups was enough to damage my cats, maybe my O2 sensors should be replaced but I don't see anything out of the ordinary in the upstream or downstream voltage outputs. So, I'm planning to replace my MAF sensor with an OEM part next.
All you need is Pcm update and smoke test
The new calibration solve some problems on my range. Amd check the pcv hose for air leaks.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Well, I replaced my MAF sensor last night with a new OEM one, same codes persist. Completely stumped...still.
 

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Evan, I know it's frustrating. I've chased the codes for a longgggg time with no success. I also had my fuel pump replaced but it wasn't related. My pump completely went out and I already had the codes before that happened. What sucks is my Rover drives fine with the codes but there's always the inspection it can't pass. Did you do a smoke test to see if you have any vacuum leaks?
 

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Discussion Starter #17
A quick update, I've solved the problem. It would appear that air was leaking into the plastic intake boot that runs between the throttle body and the MAF sensor section at the coupling. It seems like the plastic has become hardened over time and and with no o-ring or rubber seal there to help, it did not create a good seal on the lip of either the throttle body opening or the MAF sensor section opening anymore. Even with the hose clamp very tight the hardened plastic simply wasn't flexible enough to make a good seal around the lip, although it certainly appeared to be thoroughly attached. I could feel a point while fitting the intake boot to both openings, where initially it was snug and I could feel friction, but a little beyond that point when the connection should be even further engaged over the lip, the boot became loose again. Pulling the boot BACK a small amount to the point where I could again feel a lot of friction between the lip and the boot, and then tightening the hose clamp at that point seemed to solve the problem.

It's worth noting that my smoke test (though not a professional test by any means) did not indicate a leak at either area. If you've got a high mileage 4.4 AJV8 rover with P0171 and P0174, check your plastic intake boot.
 

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Evan, thanks for the update. When I get my trans issue fixed I'll check out that area. I wonder if you could put something on the outside of it that's smoking and then if there is a leak it would draft that smoke in?
 
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