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After my battle with my passenger side axel popping out, I went through a couple weeks without issue, so I thought. I purchased a reman axle and had my Indy install it. I took a peek underneath today to find the outside boot is ripped! Grease is everywhere.

Its ripped right at the hub about 2". I used permatex to temporarily seal it but its going to need to be changed out again.

I already paid $150 to put this axle in. Since I provided my own part he wants to charge $150 more. So my question is, how difficult is this to do in the driveway? I have replaced one a few years ago on a Volvo. Looking at it it seems straight forward. Any advice?
 

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If you get a split boot, if they exist for these, it wouldn't be too bad. I wouldn't want a split boot though. Otherwise you have to pull the hub off the axle and it's a pain.

Sent from my Pixel XL using Tapatalk
 

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Source boot from NAPA - should be around $15. If I recall the clamp is too small and I had to reuse my old one which I picked up for $20 the first time I changed it. Fancy SS one. Do not use zip ties. Do not use zip ties!!!

The job is not too bad. Disconnect the two arms from the inside at the subframe, not at the hub - much easier than playing with joints on the knuckle. Then if I recall you take off one of the sway bar link bolts and the steering tie rod at the knuckle. All pretty easy. The air suspension will pose problems so open the door so it doesn't extend. Support the corner with a jack or stand as it will want to fall down. A jack helps as you can move it, but be careful. If the removal of the axle from the hub is easy this is a very easy repair. Mine was not. Looking back with what I ended up doing - it is still a easy repair but requires some extra steps. If the axle comes in and out without issue ignore the following.

The biggest problem I had was getting the axle out of the hub and back in. I needed to use a axle puller/pusher to get it out - I picked up one from Autozone and also three lug nuts, not lug bolts. I used the three lug nuts as couplers to extend the attachment points as the Autozone puller would not sit correctly otherwise. I suppose you could try just pounding first - but I was working off RAVE. Pound before you take anything off, other than the axle nut. This will give you a hint as to what you will be fighting. Many can just tap it out with a drift and muscle it back in without tools. Mine was so tight on reinstall I had to devise another solution. I could not get axle inserted far enough to get threads through for the axle nut. I needed about 1/2 inch more. Removal was the easy part. I have never had this issue on any other car, my mechanic said the same. You got two options here. 1) Pull the boot back to expose the metal flange so you can hammer on it or 2) tap the axle to take a bolt that you can use to pull the axle far enough into the hub. (On some cars like Volvo - the axle is threaded in the inside to take a bolt to secure it while on other cars like the RR the axle is threaded on the outside to take a big nut to secure it).

What I learned is when I first did the axle for an engine replacement I ruined the boot trying to install it. I think your mechanic may have done this. I pounded on the boot area and missed, causing a slight tear. There just isn't any area to hit with force. I had to replace the boot. My fix was to not clamp the boot until I had the end installed on the knuckle hub fully. I pulled the boot back far enough so that I could pound on the CV metal area. This is apparent once you take off the boot. I wrapped the area with plastic so crud wouldn't fall into the joint as I pounded. Were I to do it now, knowing what I know, I would not add grease until you have the axle fully seated. Grease and clamp the boot at the end. You will not have a huge mess and you will be better able to clean up any crud that falls. So clean the joint up and install the boot, but not the clamps so you can peel it back for pounding. After I had the CV installed far enough that I could get the big axle nut on and pull the CV into place I slid the boot into its proper position. Then I clamped the boot. Here you would grease and then clamp.

On my second engine replacement, did by a mechanic this time for $500, I warned him of the issue. Well he didn't listen and messed up the boot so I fixed it again. As he encountered the same problem he decided to tap the axle end with a 1/4 bolt and used a hammer puller to get it installed. Unknown to him or me at the time he had already ruined the boot. When I got it home and put some miles on it, I saw the grease.

At this point I called him and he told me he tapped it to get it in. So I swapped out boots and tried to install it as he did. Well the 1/4 bolt didn't work for me and they kept snapping. So I went out and found a higher grade one and just managed to get it far enough. I used a metal flat bar across the hub lip with a hole drilled in the metal flat for the pulling bolt to go through, and nuts on the bolt to add strength as I turned it to pull it in. Doing it again I would have tapped for a larger bolt as one cannot find a high grade 1/4. In larger sizes you can find 8.8 or 10.8 grade which is what you want. The axle is beefy enough to handle this and the area is not critical in anyway - although tapping too deep could be a problem.

Lacking tools I would go the route I did first - peel back the boot. Tapping the axle is slick if you have the tools.

So it is not bad, but if you encounter the need for brute force on the axle - circle back with a post and I will give more details.

One final thought - I believe your mechanic did the same thing mine did and s/he ruined the boot during install.
 

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The axle's splined end at the wheel end has to be pressed out from the hub during extraction and pulled back through the hub during installation using the special LR tool below.

https://landrover.service-solutions.com/Detail/587/LRT-60-030-Superceded_to_Part_204-506?c=3

In the absence of this (or a comparable shop tool) the substitution of a big hammer will damage the threads on the end of the axle when being knocked through the hub upon tear down (I guess that may OK if it's already trash and it's going to be tossed) and hammering the back side of the axle in order to encourage the splines to slide back through the hub during installation will almost certainly cause unseen damage, even beyond a clearly visible split CV boot.

Not to mention the special LR tool halves which clamp around the inner CV joint, allowing for the inner splines to be "popped out" of their lair as retained by a large flattened C shaped clip (I know you're aware of this locking piece, from your previous problem).

Ask the shop which installed the axle if you can take a quick look at their axle puller/installation tool. Unless it looks and performs in a very, very similar manner to the official LR tool, it's a pretty good guess that the shaft was damaged during installation.

Without this tool, the splines will slide into the hub until the tip of the shaft is barely flush with the outer hub, at which point it will pretty much resist all further attempts to force it the rest of the way, undamaged. It is indeed a very tight fit.

Rob
 

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I agree with anvilrobb that the special tool would be great to use. I also agree that your shop most likely damaged the boot during reinstall.

I would like anvilrobb to post a picture of how the special tool is set up to reinstall the CV - as RAVE provides no guidance.

The rest of what I described is how I worked around the lack of special tool. One other point, my mechanic used an air hammer, at the outer CV axle dimple to remove it.
 

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kg

I don't have a picture with me but if you click on the link below you'll see a better picture of the installation part from a different vendor.

https://jlrequipment.service-solutions.com/en-GB/Pages/ItemDetail.aspx?SKU=204-506-01

The far right side of the tool (facing away) is actually an internally threaded "cup" and is slim enough to slip inside the female splined portion of the hub (from the wheel side) to grab onto the partially inserted axle's threaded end. As it's turned, the cup screws onto the threaded end of the axle shaft.

Once it's screwed on for several threads, the larger outer hub adaptor is then attached over the wheel studs and retained by a couple or three lug bolts, leaving the installation tool protruding through the center of the adaptor (the large hub looking item on the right side of the picture in the link below).

https://landrover.service-solutions....rt_204-506?c=3

A large nut is then wound onto the installation tool's external threads and as it's tightened against the hub adaptor it "pulls" the shaft further into the female splines until fully seated.

It sounds a lot more complicated than it is. Once you've seen/used the tool you'll realize what a piece of cake the job becomes.

Rob
 

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Makes complete sense. Kind of a crazy way to go about it, but I suppose it works. It also confirms that these axles are extremely tight fitting.
 
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