Range Rovers Forum banner
1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
2006-2009 Range Rover MkIII / L322
Joined
·
60 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Good afternoon all. It may be the end of an era for my Range at this point. Let me explain below.

2006 RR SC Full Size, 78,000 miles (Half of them Highway), changed spark plugs 1 month ago, fuel filter 6 months ago

Today I was driving my Range Rover and all was well with no codes popping up. I drove through a puddle about 4 inches deep and it was almost like a pit but nothing concerning at all that it or a normal car could not handle. I drove back through the same puddle and the car rocked just a little bit (it’s a little hole after all) but like I said nothing out of the ordinary.

Upon driving, my car immediately began to sputter to the point it stalled. I pulled over to the side of the road, turned it on and off and the car turns on, start revs normally and then unless I am pressing the gas above 3,000 RPM it will sputter out and die after trying to idle. 3,000 to 6,000 rpm the car will keep running with me putting my foot down but obviously I cannot hold it down and drive normally so the car is inoperable.

I plugged in my OBDII Scanner and it said immediately that all 8 cylinders were misfiring and that it misfired at start.

I was able to tow it to Firestone (only available mechanical place around here) and I fear they may not know or just say to replace the engine instead of finding the specific problem.

If anyone is able to tell me what to do or help then it would be a god send. Thank you in advance.
 

·
RIP Our Friend
Joined
·
27,833 Posts
You simply got a sensor wet. Someone familiar with the Jag engine will have to advise what sensor or sensors is/are down low. If it were a P38 it would be the crank sensor.
 

·
Registered
2006-2009 Range Rover MkIII / L322
Joined
·
60 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Did it suck up some water??

Sent from my Pixel XL using Tapatalk
Possible. The only thing is the air filter I have (Mina Gallery Air Intake) is right up next to the engine so water would be hard to get in there i’d Imagine. When I inspected it, it was not wet what so ever (the air intake and whole engine compartment) and the water honestly was not deep at all. Maybe 4 inches at most. The only thing I could think of is it somehow got in the exhaust but even then no O2 codes are being thrown and it revs above 3-6,000 like normal and I couldn’t imagine a little water destroying the car from the exhaust. I have been through much deeper water before no problem.
 

·
Registered
2006-2009 Range Rover MkIII / L322
Joined
·
60 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
You simply got a sensor wet. Someone familiar with the Jag engine will have to advise what sensor or sensors is/are down low. If it were a P38 it would be the crank sensor.
Thank you. With this said, should I trust whatever Firestone gives me as a diagnosis or shrug it off if they say I need to replace my engine/anouther part? No one here really works with Range Rover and the stealership I don’t believe would be much help doing the same thing Firestone may. I’m thinking it could be the Upfront (before cat) O2 sensors. Any ideas on what I should do or replace? Is there anyway to test what’s wrong with an OBD2 Scanner? I can provide data if need be.
 

·
Registered
2006-2009 Range Rover MkIII / L322
Joined
·
60 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Firestone and every other shop refuses to look at it. Anyone have any idea what sensor to look for or advice?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
I had a similar problem turned out the fuel pressure sensor went bad causing the fuel pressure to rise even though i wasn't at a high speed, had to replace both pumps and all sensors. if you are driving fast does the problem go away?
 

·
Registered
2006-2009 Range Rover MkIII / L322
Joined
·
60 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
In typical Range Rover fashion I ended up returning to my car and restarting it. As soon as I did, It just fired up like normal. Idk what happened exactly but the car works now with no codes and is running how it should. Thank you all for helping.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,534 Posts
Likely a sensor wet.. put some dielectric grease in the connection, clean with some CRC226 previous to that and make sure no corrosion is present.


Sent from my iPhone 7 Plus using Tapatalk Pro
 

·
RIP Our Friend
Joined
·
27,833 Posts
As said above you simply got a sensor wet and now it has dried out. All lower engine and tranny sensors and harness plugs have gaskets to keep them sealed Start with your crank sensor and see if the gasket has been compromised or the connection is cracked.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top