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2002-2005 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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Hello knowledgeable RR people. I'm hoping for some insight into the issues I am having and quite frankly are riving me nuts.

I'm an owner of an L322 RR 4.4.V8 Vogue on a 53 plate.

The inactive air susp warning comes on. I've had it cleared and it is fine for weeks and then it comes on again. Repeat and recycle. Bought a reset tool for this purpose.
Yesterday rear suspension dropped after having it in off road mode whilst in the woods. So now high at the front and low at the back

Any ideas what is occurring?

Thanks in advance

Grandad1
 

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JACK'S GRANDAD
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9,244 Posts
Seeing as this is a worldwide forum, what year is 53 plate? Yeah I could look it up, but why should we have to?
 

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It could be a sensor, the get brittle over time. Mine did the same thing, I replaced one, now another one needs to be replaced.


Hello knowledgeable RR people. I'm hoping for some insight into the issues I am having and quite frankly are riving me nuts.

I'm an owner of an L322 RR 4.4.V8 Vogue on a 53 plate.

The inactive air susp warning comes on. I've had it cleared and it is fine for weeks and then it comes on again. Repeat and recycle. Bought a reset tool for this purpose.
Yesterday rear suspension dropped after having it in off road mode whilst in the woods. So now high at the front and low at the back

Any ideas what is occurring?

Thanks in advance

Grandad1
 

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JACK'S GRANDAD
Joined
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9,244 Posts
It could be a sensor, the get brittle over time. Mine did the same thing, I replaced one, now another one needs to be replaced.
It could be a load of things. Until we know the year and what codes it's throwing, its all guesses though
 

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My first guess with info so far is that one of the air struts (usually front though) is forming a leak.
If you can get it to the "off-road" height, then push the button on the door that sends the suspension to the lowest height, then while it's lowering, listen at each corner to hear if air's escaping at some point while it's lowering.
You'll only hear it while the leak area is at a certain point in the fold of the airbag, so you have to be quick and listen closely (until the leak gets worse).
If it's not that, listen for the compressor to run excessively - of course a leak would cause it to run more too, but assuming you find no air bag leak.
 

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I had an issue similar. It would give me the Suspension Fault warning constantly. It would add air to raise but would have issues releasing to lower. I rebuilt the compressor, checked all the valve blocks and still had the same issue. It turned out it was the muffler that was gummed up and not allowing the air to release quick enough for the computer to register movement. Just pulled the muffler off and haven’t had any issues since.
 

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1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
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Do not ignore maintenance of your air pump. Replace the piston and cylinder every 2-3 years. improper, leaky air pressure will lead to poor valve performance.
 

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2002-2005 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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You need to pull the codes. My recent Air Suspension Inact was the SAS. Could be Struts, could be pump, could be height sensor.....Or just start replacing parts....
 

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Folks there is some misinformation above.

You do not throw height sensors at it, height sensors rarely fail on any model of Land Rover, you pull codes and see what is really goingon, you do not listen for air escaping and raise, you lower and use soapy water to look for bubbles from the cracks in bladders and top where the line goes into the collet. Bladders only start to crack and leak at the height most used, that is never wading mode or extended mode that can not be selected, it is usually the rolling point just below normal height and above highway mode.

Biggest mistake is ignoring the maximum speed warning. That is the system telling you that it is damaged and shuts itself down. Do not clear the hard fault and keep driving. Your compressor will overheat working to compensate for the leaks in the bladders while trying to keep the reservoir full.

Grandad, do yourself a favour and do not drive your L322. Order the RSW All Comms so you can actually read the codes you are clearing. Only then can you figure out what item or items are failing.
 

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2002-2005 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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Could be Struts, could be pump, could be height sensor.....Or just start replacing parts....
this was sarcasm....mean't to throw in it could be the radio, seat motor etc etc....point of my post was he needs to pull the codes and see what is actually failing....
 

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Folks there is some misinformation above.

You do not throw height sensors at it, height sensors rarely fail on any model of Land Rover, you pull codes and see what is really goingon, you do not listen for air escaping and raise, you lower and use soapy water to look for bubbles from the cracks in bladders and top where the line goes into the collet. Bladders only start to crack and leak at the height most used, that is never wading mode or extended mode that can not be selected, it is usually the rolling point just below normal height and above highway mode.

Biggest mistake is ignoring the maximum speed warning. That is the system telling you that it is damaged and shuts itself down. Do not clear the hard fault and keep driving. Your compressor will overheat working to compensate for the leaks in the bladders while trying to keep the reservoir full.

Grandad, do yourself a favour and do not drive your L322. Order the RSW All Comms so you can actually read the codes you are clearing. Only then can you figure out what item or items are failing.
You can absolutely listen for air is escaping. That's the whole point, air is escaping the system and causing it to drop. It can be audible! Why wouldn't you take a few seconds to listen, potentially hear a hiss and be in the troubled zone inside a minute. Not to say soapy water can't help, but not all leaks are at the bellows. I agree throwing parts without having pulled codes is foolish but you can narrow down a leak simply by listening for it.
 
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