RangeRovers.net Forum banner

1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
2006-2009 Range Rover Sport
Joined
·
66 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
On previous cars, I had used places like 1AAuto for small parts with no issues.

My OEM compressor is spitting out a constant C1A13 code these days and I'm too chickensh*t to rebuild the exhaust valve.

I was about to bite the bullet on the Lucky8 compressor for $~360, but then stumbled upon the 1AAuto one for $267.


Has anyone had any experience with this compressor or other aftermarket ones?
 

·
Registered
2006-2009 Range Rover Sport
Joined
·
66 Posts
Discussion Starter #2
went ahead and ordered the 1AAuto one - will report back after I slap it on and put some miles on it
 

·
Registered
2013-2015 Range Rover Sport
Joined
·
159 Posts
went ahead and ordered the 1AAuto one - will report back after I slap it on and put some miles on it
I have used the cheap Aftermarket Hitachi's (not proud to say it) they are severely hit or miss. Usually most of them have the wrong connector and have to be rewired into the old harness off the bad compressor. (easily done) I have also had a couple fail really quickly. So a Roll of the Dice you might get one that works.
 

·
Registered
2006-2009 Range Rover Sport
Joined
·
66 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
I have used the cheap Aftermarket Hitachi's (not proud to say it) they are severely hit or miss. Usually most of them have the wrong connector and have to be rewired into the old harness off the bad compressor. (easily done) I have also had a couple fail really quickly. So a Roll of the Dice you might get one that works.
So far, so good with the 1AAuto one. The fitment was spot on, no louder than the OEM one, didn’t have to modify the harness either. Raised and lowered the rangie a few times with no codes. Sprayed some soapy water on parts of it, no leaks. Will report back periodically.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
So far, so good with the 1AAuto one. The fitment was spot on, no louder than the OEM one, didn’t have to modify the harness either. Raised and lowered the rangie a few times with no codes. Sprayed some soapy water on parts of it, no leaks. Will report back periodically.
Hello - Can I get an update on the aftermarket compressor you installed?
 

·
Registered
2006-2009 Range Rover Sport
Joined
·
66 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Hello - Can I get an update on the aftermarket compressor you installed?
400ish miles - no issues. it runs for about 15-20 seconds upon a cold start-up. i raised and lowered it yesterday just for fun - it seems to go up faster than before.
 

·
Registered
2006-2009 Range Rover Sport
Joined
·
66 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
800 mile update: sadly im getting an intermittent c1a13 code again, sometimes amber, sometimes red/amber (max speed 30mph warning). im leaning towards the culprit not being the compressor, but something with the lines themselves. this is the third compressor ive had on it in the past year.

i read about "flushing the lines" - but couldn't find a good DIY for it. i might just throw in the towel and take it to a LR shop to further diagnose.
 

·
Registered
2006-2009 Range Rover Sport
Joined
·
772 Posts
800 mile update: sadly im getting an intermittent c1a13 code again, sometimes amber, sometimes red/amber (max speed 30mph warning). im leaning towards the culprit not being the compressor, but something with the lines themselves. this is the third compressor ive had on it in the past year.

i read about "flushing the lines" - but couldn't find a good DIY for it. i might just throw in the towel and take it to a LR shop to further diagnose.
Clearing the lines is no big deal - just disconnect at each end and blow compressed air through.

While i suspect you current issues are to do with the cheap aftermarket compressor it of course may not be. I would pull the exhaust valve out of the compressor and ensure there is no crud stopping it from closing. This "crud" could be coming from dirt in the lines left over from you previous compressor failures - it is a white power. So depressurise the system - just crack a pipe near the central valve block between the compressor and air tank and wait until the hiss stops. Note the plumbing on the central valve block and undo the pipes and electrical connectors and take the valve block out and take out the solenoids - and clean everything up with compressed air - carefully. Clear any white powder.

Blow all the pipes out and reassemble - with the compressor out take the exhaust valve out and clean up with compressed air.

Reassemble and run everything making sure there are no leaks.

if the fault comes back then you most like have an issue with the compressor. My exhaust valve was being held open by crud which I dislodged by tapping with a rubber mallet as my valve was corroded in and the housing broke off (now sealed with super glue but works fine) and I could not take out the exhaust valve without drilling it out.

However the fact that the "new" compressor rang for a few months before faulting indicates there is no crud in the system and it would have faulted soon after installation. The fault code indicates the exhaust valve so just replace it.

The above options would seem to cover aspects you have concerns about but firstlook at the exhaust valve.

Garry
 

·
Registered
2006-2009 Range Rover Sport
Joined
·
66 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Clearing the lines is no big deal - just disconnect at each end and blow compressed air through.

While i suspect you current issues are to do with the cheap aftermarket compressor it of course may not be. I would pull the exhaust valve out of the compressor and ensure there is no crud stopping it from closing. This "crud" could be coming from dirt in the lines left over from you previous compressor failures - it is a white power. So depressurise the system - just crack a pipe near the central valve block between the compressor and air tank and wait until the hiss stops. Note the plumbing on the central valve block and undo the pipes and electrical connectors and take the valve block out and take out the solenoids - and clean everything up with compressed air - carefully. Clear any white powder.

Blow all the pipes out and reassemble - with the compressor out take the exhaust valve out and clean up with compressed air.

Reassemble and run everything making sure there are no leaks.

if the fault comes back then you most like have an issue with the compressor. My exhaust valve was being held open by crud which I dislodged by tapping with a rubber mallet as my valve was corroded in and the housing broke off (now sealed with super glue but works fine) and I could not take out the exhaust valve without drilling it out.

However the fact that the "new" compressor rang for a few months before faulting indicates there is no crud in the system and it would have faulted soon after installation. The fault code indicates the exhaust valve so just replace it.

The above options would seem to cover aspects you have concerns about but firstlook at the exhaust valve.

Garry
Hi Garry - thanks for the suggestions. I was in a pinch as I wanted to take my RRS to an offroad rover rally this past weekend. I stopped by a reputable independent rover shop and they didn't even want to diagnose it further - just saying that they recommend putting in an AMK compressor. I politely declined. Instead, I took the cover off the compressor and gave the valve area a few good whacks with a plastic punch. This cleared the code for literally 2 full days of rough offroading (often raising the suspension). No issues at all - even the 2-hour journey to the event and back - had no suspension faults. From today, the darn code is back. I've contacted 1AAuto as the part is under warranty. We'll see what they say.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
Ok, here’s another great example and reason I went with the AB coil spring conversion kit.....I do not own a plastic punch, and do not want to buy one. My weekend, I loaded the Sport Saturday night with Traeger tailgate grill, tables, chairs, food, cooler (full of good stuff)....7:30am Sunday morning, ignition and take off for 1hr 45min drive to Charlotte (Panthers) — No valve banging, no air leaks, no issues ——— I did have to drive over a curb and grassy area to get to tailgate area...The Sport and coils handled the challenge beautifully, with no belly hang up or trouble.

Come on folks — chill and laugh, I know you want to.
 

·
Registered
2006-2009 Range Rover Sport
Joined
·
66 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Ok, here’s another great example and reason I went with the AB coil spring conversion kit.....I do not own a plastic punch, and do not want to buy one. My weekend, I loaded the Sport Saturday night with Traeger tailgate grill, tables, chairs, food, cooler (full of good stuff)....7:30am Sunday morning, ignition and take off for 1hr 45min drive to Charlotte (Panthers) — No valve banging, no air leaks, no issues ——— I did have to drive over a curb and grassy area to get to tailgate area...The Sport and coils handled the challenge beautifully, with no belly hang up or trouble.

Come on folks — chill and laugh, I know you want to.
Man i hear that - i've been going back and forth with ditching the air suspension for AB 2" coils. i know my OEM 160k shocks are worn out. this coupled with my on/off again air suspension issues are heavily making me think about going coils. did you go with the 2" or normal ride height version?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
I went with the normal ride height - I’m pleasantly surprised the ride quality and handling is excellent. I appreciate there are purist on here that are against dumping the EAS, and yes the raising and lowering feature is fun, but I’m not a DIY guy, and simply don’t want the hassle, or risk of hassle.
 

·
Registered
2006-2009 Range Rover Sport
Joined
·
772 Posts
My weekend, I loaded the Sport Saturday night with Traeger tailgate grill, tables, chairs, food, cooler (full of good stuff)....7:30am Sunday morning, ignition and take off for 1hr 45min drive to Charlotte (Panthers) — No valve banging, no air leaks, no issues ——— I did have to drive over a curb and grassy area to get to tailgate area...The Sport and coils handled the challenge beautifully, with no belly hang up or trouble.
My weekend, I loaded the 91yo mother into the Sport lowered to access height, and went out for dinner - granny in and out no issue at the lowered height. ....7:30am Sunday morning, headed off from Mum's (note correct english is Mum not Mom ;)) for my 500km drive back home - set the suspension at 20mm below onroad height for freeway speeds. Public holiday here on Monday so headed into the mountains for some offroading in the National Park - climbing hills, fording rivers with height changes from onroad to super-extended and then back home — No valve banging, no air leaks, no issues ——— I did have to drive over a curb and grassy area to get into my drive...The Sport and air suspension handled the challenge beautifully, with no belly hang up or trouble. :cool:

Garry
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
My weekend, I loaded the 91yo mother into the Sport lowered to access height, and went out for dinner - granny in and out no issue at the lowered height. ....7:30am Sunday morning, headed off from Mum's (note correct english is Mum not Mom ;)) for my 500km drive back home - set the suspension at 20mm below onroad height for freeway speeds. Public holiday here on Monday so headed into the mountains for some offroading in the National Park - climbing hills, fording rivers with height changes from onroad to super-extended and then back home — No valve banging, no air leaks, no issues ——— I did have to drive over a curb and grassy area to get into my drive...The Sport and air suspension handled the challenge beautifully, with no belly hang up or trouble. :cool:

Garry
Garry - You’re a good man! I really like your spunk and wit....

My mom (Note: Correct North Carolina Southern English is mom, not mum - Not sure if it was big news down your way, so brace yourself—We kicked the “English”, and I assume you mean the Queens English - The British, out of these here parts a number of years back, committed high treason, took over the area and are a run’in it ourselves, doin just fine) too is 91, be very thankful you can still get her out and about - up until about a year ago my mom could still get out, but no longer is that something we can enjoy, so please make the most of it!! BUT - when she was still able to get out, she demanded to be driven in her 2012 Cadillac CTS Luxury - I could pull up in my E Class MB, my oldest son in his new C Class MB, my niece in her new Mazda SUV.....Nope! “Here, take my keys, we are taking my car, it needs to be driven”, she’d say with a firm tone....You don’t argue or challenge your mom, at least not my mom - she’s still of sound mind and could change her will—ha ha.

You are one of the purists I referenced, and I totally respect you position and especially your passion for the brand — but for me, and my current Sport, having the coil spring conversion makes me as happy as a pig in the mud - and if I get stuck in said mud, the Sport will still get me out.

Y’all got pigs where you are? You ever seen ‘em rootin around in the mud? They’re happy! That’s me!

Cheers my friend...and cheers to all our “mums!” Yes I said mums, that’s for Garry and the others on this site that speak proper English.
 

·
Registered
2006-2009 Range Rover Sport
Joined
·
66 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
alright - ill give it one more try with more effort - 1AAuto got back to me thinking that the issue is with the airlines or valve block being crudded up. ill take the compressor out (this literally takes me 15 minutes now that i've done it so many times). ill take out the exhaust valve bolt to inspect and clean that out (with it being new, i hope that it doesn't shear off). i'll pull the center valve block and inspect for white powder, clean out the lines that go from the compressor to that valve block. will report back after all that is done.
 

·
Registered
2006-2009 Range Rover Sport
Joined
·
66 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
alright - finally had some time to tinker on the rangie this weekend. replaced some sway bar bushings/endlinks. while i had it on a lift, i took out the compressor and center valve block. cracked open both and they were immaculate - no signs of white dust. i did notice that the 17mm bolt holding down the exhaust valve was just hand tight. i blew compressed air through all the airlines i could access around the compressor and valve block, didn't see anything. i drove it around 30 miles before getting an amber suspension light for about 30 seconds before it disappeared. i've never seen the amber light reset itself before while driving.
 

·
Registered
2006-2009 Range Rover Sport
Joined
·
772 Posts
alright - finally had some time to tinker on the rangie this weekend. replaced some sway bar bushings/endlinks. while i had it on a lift, i took out the compressor and center valve block. cracked open both and they were immaculate - no signs of white dust. i did notice that the 17mm bolt holding down the exhaust valve was just hand tight. i blew compressed air through all the airlines i could access around the compressor and valve block, didn't see anything. i drove it around 30 miles before getting an amber suspension light for about 30 seconds before it disappeared. i've never seen the amber light reset itself before while driving.
What code do you have now? Still getting the c1a13 code (pressure does not decrease while venting)? If so this still indicates an issue with the central valve block or the compressor exhaust valve. (it could also indicate that either the front or rear valve blocks can be sticking but if your car does go down as it should then unlikely). The fact that the fault light came on and then went off indicates the "venting" system started working so if there is no crud then the relevant valves could be sticky or their solenoids intermittent.

I would clear all codes, then drive the car and if the fault comes back then read the codes immediately as these will be relevant and take it from there. As indicated the solenoid that vents in the central block might be sticky and/or the solenoid that operates the exhaust valve in the may be sticky (or simply the solenoids themselves may have issues) - the reading of fresh codes might help.

Google Land Rover c1a13 code or whatever code you have and you will see lots of solutions and issues that may help you.

Good luck.

Garry
 

·
Registered
2006-2009 Range Rover Sport
Joined
·
66 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
update: i was having a pretty constant C1A13 code again since "rebuilding" my new 1AAuto Compressor. my RRS would also go into extended mode more often than not upon start up, but even with the C1A13, it would level out after driving it. i went back and forth with going coils. I have a 2-week overland trip planned in Colorado and Utah this Spring with some kitted Toyotas and was dreading thinking about suspension failure on the trails, far away from home. But then the trails I've been doing as of late have required more ground clearance than what the 2" coils offer.

Ended up getting and installing the Lucky8 Heavy Duty compressor on my RRS last week. The unit is made by Dunlop.


1AAuto actually ended up refunding my compressor 100% and let me keep it, awesome customer service there.

So far, so good with the new Dunlop compressor. No more extended mode randomly, and the truck actually goes into access mode now - didn't think a new compressor would alleviate those issues. driven about 2-3 hours, 200 miles so far. but i did see the right rear of the RRS lowers after only 2 hours of parking - looks like new rear struts are in order :cautious:
 
  • Like
Reactions: garrycol
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top